ILNews

7th Circuit split in prisoner media-ban issue

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals was split in its en banc decision today to uphold the Federal Bureau of Prisons' authority to deny face-to-face interviews between inmates and the media. The majority, which affirmed the grant of summary judgment in favor of the defendants, believed the rule was legitimate to protect security interests; the dissent worried the ruling violated prisoners' First Amendment rights.

In David Paul Hammer v. John D. Ashcroft, et al., No. 06-1750, David Paul Hammer filed suit against then-Attorney General John Ashcroft and other public officials who drafted a policy that banned inmates of the Special Confinement Unit in Terre Haute from speaking to the media in person. The ban was put into effect after public outrage about a CBS broadcast in 2000 of an interview with Timothy McVeigh, who was sentenced to death for killing 168 people by bombing the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. Prior to that ban in 2000, Hammer had spoken face-to-face with media.

Ashcroft announced the change in policy saying he wanted to restrict a mass murderer's access to the public as "an American who cares about our culture," and he was concerned about irresponsible glamorization of a culture of violence.

Last year, a 7th Circuit panel originally reversed the ruling by then-District Judge John Tinder, which was vacated by granting the rehearing en banc.

Judges Richard Posner, Michael Kanne, Terence Evans, Diane Sykes, and Chief Judge Frank Easterbrook, who wrote for the majority, believed the policy was constitutional based in Saxbe v. Washington Post Co., 417 U.S. 843 (1974), and Pell v. Procunier 417 U.S. 817 (1974). Those rulings establish the BOP could enforce a system-wide rule against personal or video interviews between prisoners and reporters. The rule at issue, THA 1480.05A, is reasonably related to legitimate security interests, wrote Chief Judge Easterbrook. Prisons don't want inmates to become famous and celebrities through the interviews, which could raise tensions within prison.

The majority also found the blanket ban of face-to-face media interviews of prisoners on death row is neutral, and it doesn't see why Ashcroft and others should have to testify as to what they were thinking when they instituted the rule. The majority also believed Hammer could communicate with the media in an uncensored format about prisoners and conditions through writing.

Judges Ilana Rover, William Bauer, and Diane Wood dissented, worrying the majority's holding goes too far and will allow the government to suppress speech they find offensive, which is not a legitimate penological interest, wrote Judge Rovner in her dissent in which Judge Bauer joined. Judge Wood wrote her own dissent but agreed with the points made by Judge Rovner.

There is a question of fact that was overlooked by the District Court: Is the jailhouse-celebrity concern a legitimate one or is it "simply a convenient way to justify a policy designed to control speech content of a particular subset of prisoners," questioned Judge Rovner.

"It is unclear why speaking in-person with a journalist would give an unknown death-row inmate more influence over other prisoners than would, for example, allowing Martha Stewart or George Ryan to give face-to-face interviews during their incarceration, which they would have been or are free to do under the Bureau's policies," she wrote.

The dissenting judges also wrote that Hammer was denied the opportunity to create a full record at the summary-judgment stage because the government moved for summary judgment before the close of discovery and objected to Hammer's requests for discovery.

Judges Joel Flaum, Ann Claire Williams, and Tinder didn't participate in the consideration or decision of the appeal.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Today, I want to use this opportunity to tell everyone about Dr agbuza of agbuzaodera(at)gmail. com, on how he help me reunited with my husband after 2 months of divorce.My husband divorce me because he saw another woman in his office and he said to me that he is no longer in love with me anymore and decide to divorce me.I seek help from the Net and i saw good talk about Dr agbuza and i contact him and explain my problem to him and he cast a spell for me which i use to get my husband back within 2 days.am totally happy because there is no reparations and side-effect. If you need his help Email him at agbuzaodera(at)gmail. com

  2. The practitioners and judges who hail E-filing as the Saviour of the West need to contain their respective excitements. E-filing is federal court requires the practitioner to cram his motion practice into pigeonholes created by IT people. Compound motions or those seeking alternative relief are effectively barred, unless the practitioner wants to receive a tart note from some functionary admonishing about the "problem". E-filing is just another method by which courts and judges transfer their burden to practitioners, who are the really the only powerless components of the system. Of COURSE it is easier for the court to require all of its imput to conform to certain formats, but this imposition does NOT improve the quality of the practice of law and does NOT improve the ability of the practitioner to advocate for his client or to fashion pleadings that exactly conform to his client's best interests. And we should be very wary of the disingenuous pablum about the costs. The courts will find a way to stick it to the practitioner. Lake County is a VERY good example of this rapaciousness. Any one who does not believe this is invited to review the various special fees that system imposes upon practitioners- as practitioners- and upon each case ON TOP of the court costs normal in every case manually filed. Jurisprudence according to Aldous Huxley.

  3. Any attorneys who practice in federal court should be able to say the same as I can ... efiling is great. I have been doing it in fed court since it started way back. Pacer has its drawbacks, but the ability to hit an e-docket and pull up anything and everything onscreen is a huge plus for a litigator, eps the sole practitioner, who lacks a filing clerk and the paralegal support of large firms. Were I an Indiana attorney I would welcome this great step forward.

  4. Can we get full disclosure on lobbyist's payments to legislatures such as Mr Buck? AS long as there are idiots that are disrespectful of neighbors and intent on shooting fireworks every night, some kind of regulations are needed.

  5. I am the mother of the child in this case. My silence on the matter was due to the fact that I filed, both in Illinois and Indiana, child support cases. I even filed supporting documentation with the Indiana family law court. Not sure whether this information was provided to the court of appeals or not. Wish the case was done before moving to Indiana, because no matter what, there is NO WAY the state of Illinois would have allowed an appeal on a child support case!

ADVERTISEMENT