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Abrams: Celebrating Law Day

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jeff abrams ibaMay 1 is officially recognized as Law Day. The day is spent reflecting on the role of law in the pursuit of happiness in our everyday lives and recognizing the importance of law for our community.

The first president to declare May 1 to be Law Day was President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The same day was recognized around the world as a day to remember the laborers fighting for better wages and working conditions. Law Day has not risen to a government holiday, but it is routinely recognized around the United States. The Indianapolis Bar Association Paralegal Committee typically will conduct a career fair enlightening students on the services rendered by lawyers and paralegals and the benefits of having a career in our world.

Another event recently held on Law Day was a Naturalization Ceremony at Shortridge High School for Law and Public Policy where individuals were welcomed as new citizens of the United States and the State of Indiana. I have attended this ceremony, and it is an extremely moving event. There are very few people in attendance who do not shed a tear of happiness as a new citizen, as the proud parent of a new citizen, as the close friend of a new citizen or just as a bystander who is touched by the emotional impact for these people who have taken the time to study and learn about the history of the United States and the State of Indiana. The Indianapolis Bar Association is privileged to be able to say a few words to the new citizens. Our thanks to Kelly Scanlan who recently presented the remarks below to our new citizens on behalf of the Indianapolis Bar Association:

“As a representative of the Indianapolis Bar Association, it is my pleasure to extend my Association’s sincere best wishes and congratulations on this joyous occasion, and to welcome you as new citizens of the United States and the State of Indiana. The Indianapolis Bar Association is an organization of local attorneys that was formed over 100 years ago for several important reasons. The most significant reasons included to advance the profession of law, to uphold and defend the Constitution, to develop and maintain both integrity and impartiality in the administration of justice, and to apply the knowledge and experience of its members to the promotion of the public good. The members of the IndyBar have sworn to defend our Constitution, just as you have here this morning. This is a common thread and duty we all share.

To honor this occasion, the IndyBar is providing each of you with a book containing the constitutions of the United States and the State of Indiana. The rights and freedoms that we enjoy as United States citizens are precious and unparalleled. Our hope is that this gift will remind you of the blessings of liberty and justice that we enjoy every day in our lives as Americans. The first page of this book describes some of the legal services we may be able to assist you with in the future, should the need arise.

Congratulations, and on behalf of the Indianapolis Bar Association, I welcome you as citizens of this wonderful country.”

So remember Law Day as a day with significant meaning in our lives. It is also a day where non-lawyers have an incredible reason to remember the day at their naturalization ceremony. If you should ever have an hour to spare, I strongly encourage you to attend one of these ceremonies and if you do not shed a tear with these people, I will buy you lunch, but be careful, as I may cry in it.•

Law Day – May 1 of every year.

Includes a naturalization ceremony where everyone sheds a tear.

A day for all lawyers to be proud of what we do.

Promoting justice and helping people without needing a thank you.

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  1. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  2. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  3. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  4. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  5. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

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