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ACLU of Indiana's dinner to honor organization’s founder

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The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana’s annual dinner this year will honor Irving L. Fink, an attorney who helped found the organization and Indiana Legal Services.

The Oct. 16 dinner begins at 7 p.m. in the Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis Student Center, 4th Floor, 420 University Blvd., with a public reception beginning an hour earlier. The keynote speaker is Claire Buffie, an Indiana native who is the current reigning Miss New York. She graduated from Ball State University and is an advocate for equal rights.

That same day is the annual Student Conference at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis’ Inlow Hall. The conference theme is “The Life of Jane Addams,” a pioneering social worker, outspoken women’s suffragist, anti-war protestor, founding member of the ACLU and NAACP, and the first woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize. There will also be workshops to raise awareness of rights and to promote freedom. The conference kicks off at 8 a.m. and ends at 4:30 p.m.

Registration for the Student Conference is $25 for everyone and includes parking; $75 for students who want to attend both the conference and dinner, and $100 for those without a student ID. Registration is available online on the ACLU of Indiana’s website. Registration and payment must be received by Oct. 6.

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  1. Major social engineering imposed by judicial order well in advance of democratic change, has been the story of the whole post ww2 period. Contraception, desegregation, abortion, gay marriage: all rammed down the throats of Americans who didn't vote to change existing laws on any such thing, by the unelected lifetime tenure Supreme court heirarchs. Maybe people came to accept those things once imposed upon them, but, that's accommodation not acceptance; and surely not democracy. So let's quit lying to the kids telling them this is a democracy. Some sort of oligarchy, but no democracy that's for sure, and it never was. A bourgeois republic from day one.

  2. JD Massur, yes, brings to mind a similar stand at a Texas Mission in 1836. Or Vladivostok in 1918. As you seemingly gloat, to the victors go the spoils ... let the looting begin, right?

  3. I always wondered why high fence deer hunting was frowned upon? I guess you need to keep the population steady. If you don't, no one can enjoy hunting! Thanks for the post! Fence

  4. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  5. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

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