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Adding UPL to Indiana RICO statute

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An Indiana Supreme Court case involving an estate planning “trust mill” has led to a policy discussion about whether certain types of unauthorized practice of law should rise above a misdemeanor crime and involve a racketeering component.

The Indiana General Assembly will likely be asked to consider a proposal during its next session, following an interim Probate Code Study Commission recommendation for changes to state statute about how the state targets those individuals or businesses that illegally practice law. Specifically, lawmakers could address whether a pattern of UPL should be added to the list of three dozen crimes covered by the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations statute.

foley-ralph-mug.jpg Foley

“This is a phenomenon we’ve tried to address in the past,” said Rep. Ralph Foley, R-Martinsville, an attorney who practices probate law and chairs the study committee. “The problem is that these are charlatans trying to deceive people. They aren’t lawyers and are nothing but a bad way to separate people from their money.”

The case against Indianapolis-based United Financial Systems Corp. initiated this policy discussion. The Indiana Supreme Court determined United Financial was illegally practicing law when preparing and selling estate planning documents and services to people. The Indiana State Bar Association filed a “trust mill” suit three years ago, and in April 2010 the justices determined United Financial should have known what it was doing was UPL and ordered the disgorgement of fees the company received from its UPL. All of the Indiana estate plan customers going back to 1995 were to be notified of the decision, but the company refused to pay those refunds immediately, and the justices in December 2010 ordered United Financial to notify those customers and return the fees as previously ordered.

An exact monetary figure of refunds or claims isn’t outlined in the order or in court filings. But in the court’s ruling, it provided context for the potential amount: from October 2006 through May 2009, the company’s Indiana business included 1,306 estate plans grossing more than $2.7 million. Nationally, 18.8 percent of United Financial’s total income was reported to have come from estate planning services in this state.

The Indiana Supreme Court in June said it wouldn’t reconsider its 2010 ruling, and now former Monroe Circuit Judge Viola Taliaferro is acting as commissioner and deciding what resolution is best for the case.

Earlier in the year, she determined that United Financial had failed without good cause to pay refunds to 346 customers, and she’s now determining whether contempt sanctions should be imposed. At a hearing in late October, the commissioner heard evidence about the company’s information on past customers, tax returns and financial documentation, and both sides have submitted proposed findings for Taliaferro to consider. The proposals call for repaying the restitution amount over the course of seven years, according to attorneys in the case.

Separate from the restitution action before Taliaferro, two lawsuits against United Financial are pending in Marion and Fulton counties as a result of the Supreme Court’s decision about the company’s prior activity.

The lawsuits and judicial action sparked legislative discussion about strengthening state criminal and probate code to address what some consider racketeering.

At the probate commission meeting Oct. 12, members voted 11-2 in support of recommending law changes to the General Assembly.

The changes would add UPL, currently a Class B misdemeanor outlined in Indiana Code 33-43-2, to the list of crimes covered under the RICO statute in IC 35-45-6. By definition, a pattern of racketeering activity occurs when a business or person engages in two or more incidents that had the same or similar intent, result, method of commission or was otherwise interrelated by distinguishing characteristics to other incidents. The current statute lists 36 crimes or activities including murder, arson, theft, child solicitation, promoting professional gambling and money laundering.

Proposed legislation would take effect July 1, 2012. It would allow for enhanced penalties under the racketeering statute, such as giving prosecutors the discretion to make UPL a Class C felony.

Vincennes attorney Jeff Kolb, who chaired the ISBA’s UPL section during the initial United Financial investigation, said he agrees this UPL activity fits into the racketeering definition and that a law change would strengthen the ability to collect restitution or even obtain attorneys fees from the prosecution of these actions.

Foley said that he and former Rep. Trent Van Haaften, D-Mount Vernon, had previously tried unsuccessfully to add UPL to the list of racketeering activities and that now is the time to move forward.

“They’ve developed a scheme and are taking advantage of people and stealing from them,” Foley said about those engaging in UPL similar to the United Financial activity. “Pure and simple, I think it’s a scheme that is racketeering.”

blakey-robert-mug.jpg Blakey

Not everyone on the probate panel agrees. Sen. Susan Glick, R-LaGrange, a former county prosecutor, said she didn’t believe UPL fit with the other listed crimes such as arson and child solicitation. Two non-attorney committee members – Tom Hardin and David Pendergast – voted against the proposal.

“I just wonder if there’s a need here, and if we’re not using a sledge hammer to hit at this when a misdemeanor should be used,” Hardin said.

University of Notre Dame law professor G. Robert Blakey, who helped craft the federal RICO Act in 1970, and is considered one of the nation’s foremost experts on RICO law, said he thinks the kind of UPL activity at issue in this discussion should be covered by the state racketeering statute.

The predicate may not be the same as other offenses, such as murder or drug trafficking, but Blakey says RICO was designed to target illegal businesses operating as an enterprise.

“Organized crime is not limited to the mob, and white-collar crime equals RICO,” he said. “This sounds like white-collar crime to me and it (the proposed statute revisions) makes a lot of sense to me.”•

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  1. MCBA .... time for a new release about your entire membership (or is it just the alter ego) being "saddened and disappointed" in the failure to lynch a police officer protecting himself in the line of duty. But this time against Eric Holder and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: "WASHINGTON — Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/us/justice-department-ferguson-civil-rights-darren-wilson.html?ref=us&_r=0

  2. Dr wail asfour lives 3 hours from the hospital,where if he gets an emergency at least he needs three hours,while even if he is on call he should be in a location where it gives him max 10 minutes to be beside the patient,they get paid double on their on call days ,where look how they handle it,so if the death of the patient occurs on weekend and these doctors still repeat same pattern such issue should be raised,they should be closer to the patient.on other hand if all the death occured on the absence of the Dr and the nurses handle it,the nurses should get trained how to function appearntly they not that good,if the Dr lives 3 hours far from the hospital on his call days he should sleep in the hospital

  3. It's a capital offense...one for you Latin scholars..

  4. I would like to suggest that you train those who search and help others, to be a Confidential Intermediary. Original Birth Certificates should not be handed out "willie nillie". There are many Birth Parents that have never told any of their families about, much less their Husband and Children about a baby born prior to their Mother's marriage. You can't go directly to her house, knock on her door and say I am the baby that you had years ago. This is what an Intermediary does as well as the search. They are appointed by by the Court after going through training and being Certified. If you would like, I can make a copy of my Certificate to give you an idea. you will need to attend classes and be certified then sworn in to follow the laws. I still am active and working on 5 cases at this time. Considering the fact that I am listed as a Senior Citizen, that's not at all bad. Being Certified is a protection for you as well as the Birth Mother. I have worked with many adoptees as well as the Birth Parents. They will also need understanding, guidance, and emotional help to deal with their own lost child and the love and fear that they have had locked up for all these years. If I could talk with those involved with the legal end, as well as those who do the searches and the Birth Mothers that lost their child, we JUST might find an answer that helps all of those involved. I hope that this will help you and others in the future. If you need to talk, I am listed with the Adoption Agencies here in Michigan. They can give you my phone number. My email address is as follows jatoz8@yahoo.com. Make sure that you use the word ADOPTION as the subject. Thank you for reading my message. Jeanette Abronowitz.

  5. The promise of "Not to Tell" is the biggest lie ever given to a Birth Mother. THERE WERE NEVER ANY PROMISES GIVEN TO ANY OF US. One of the lies used to entice us to give up our Babies. There were many tactics used to try to convince us that it was best for Mother and Baby to cut the cord at birth. They have no idea of the pain and heartache that was caused by their attitude. The only thing that mattered was how great and wonderful they appeared to the prospective parents and their community. I completed my search, but that didn't stop the pain, heartbreak and the tears of the last 62 Years. I keep track and do know that he is alive, well educated and a musician. That little knowledge in itself is a Godsend to me. I pray that other Mothers also know that much and more to help heal their pain and open wounds. open wounds.

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