ILNews

Man faces federal charge in courthouse plot

Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

The Pike County man arrested after police discovered his plan to blow up the county courthouse now faces federal charges.

Kerry A. Thomas, of Oakland City, is charged in the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, with possession of a destructive device. During a Nov. 1 search of his home, police found a PVC pipe containing a blasting cap, a cast booster, a degraded cast booster, and detonation cord. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives determined those materials constitute a destructive device as defined under federal law.

Under state law, Thomas is charged with Class A felony unlawful possession of a destructive device or explosive to kill, injure, or to destroy property; and Class C felony unlawful possession of a destructive device.

The U.S. Attorney Office also announced Thomas faces a charge of possession of unregistered machine guns. The complaint alleges that on March 16, 2009, Thomas illegally had three machine guns that weren't registered to him in the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record.

Police searched Thomas' home to find evidence relating to the murder of Patrick E. King when they found the bomb-making materials. Allegedly Thomas told at least two people he planned to set a bomb off in the Pike Circuit Court courtroom to kill himself and others if he was found guilty at his trial Nov. 4.

Thomas was on trial for criminal confinement, intimidation, pointing a firearm, and battery stemming from an incident in March, according to the Pike County Clerk's Office.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. The Conour embarrassment is an example of why it would be a good idea to NOT name public buildings or to erect monuments to "worthy" people until AFTER they have been dead three years, at least. And we also need to stop naming federal buildings and roads after a worthless politician whose only achievement was getting elected multiple times (like a certain Congressman after whom we renamed the largest post office in the state). Also, why have we renamed BOTH the Center Township government center AND the new bus terminal/bum hangout after Julia Carson?

  2. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  3. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  4. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  5. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

ADVERTISEMENT