ILNews

Conference to address poverty, globalization

IL Staff
January 1, 2008
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How the law and legal associations can lessen the impacts of poverty both at home and abroad will be the focus of a Law, Poverty and Economic Inequality Conference April 3 and 4 at Valparaiso University School of Law.

Visiting professor Penelope Andrews organized the conference in response to the various ways globalization has affected poverty through job loss, diminishing labor rights, lower earnings, and an increase in private companies taking over the former responsibilities of governments.

The event will consist of approximately 60 legal scholars, judges, lawyers, and non-profit advocates from the United States, Australia, Canada, Liberia, the United Kingdom and other countries who are experts in the area of poverty on a national and global scale.

The conference will consider poverty in the United States and around the world, while providing an opportunity for those with an interest in these issues to network with each other, including members of the public and law students.

Discussion topics will include courts and access to justice, legal strategies for eliminating poverty, indigenous communities and poverty, globalization and human rights, and poverty and aging.

Featured participants are Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker, a Valparaiso alumnus; Judge Dennis Davis of Cape Town High Court, South Africa; Chief Magistrate Ian Gray of Victoria, Australia; Henry Freedman, executive director of the National Center for Law and Economic Justice; Donna Greschner, a professor of law at the University of La Verne and former head of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission; Jallah Barbu, a research fellow at the Center for Constitutional Democracy in Plural Societies at Indiana University School of Law - Bloomington; and Siobhan Mullally, a professor of law at University College in Ireland who has consulted with a number of United Nations agencies and international non-governmental organizations in East Timor, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.

The evening of April 3, those attending the conference will gather at St. Timothy Community Church in Gary for a banquet at which local community activists and Valparaiso law graduates from Gary will be guests.

The conference will be held at the school, 656 S. Greenwich St. in Valparaiso, and has been approved for CLE credit. The deadline to register for those who need university-arranged hotel accommodations is March 15. For those who do not need hotel accommodations, the deadline is March 27.

For more information about the conference, including a complete listing of sessions and speakers, visit the conference's Web site, or call the School of Law at (219) 465-7829 for registration forms and information.
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  1. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  2. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  3. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  4. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

  5. Can I get this form on line,if not where can I obtain one. I am eligible.

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