ILNews

Spring Break?

March 31, 2010
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Many of you reading this will have just come back from a much-needed and muchdeserved "getaway" during the busy season of "Spring Break." This season comes with crowded airports, shoeless and beltless security lines, packed planes, and beaches busting with sunbathers. It has all the fun of children off, BlackBerries off, and time off from the office. For those of you who braved travel during this period, you have come back either really refreshed or needing a real vacation. For those of you who opted to stay behind, you deserve a break. As the trees bud and the nights stay lighter longer, now is a good time to refresh yourself in the practice of law and give yourself a "break" that doesn't come with sun or sand.

A good lawyer is a happy lawyer. Sounds corny, but it's true. Long hours, heavy workloads, increased pressures from emails and other instant-reply expectations, not to mention the current economic climate, these all play a factor in attorney burnout. There are tips out there to help de-stress your day, streamline your work, ease your mind, increase focus, and give you something concrete to combat lawyer lethargy. From other bar associations grappling with this issue, to professional firms and motivational sites, the Internet has a plethora of information on this subject. As I prepared to write this article, I "surfed" for information on increasing attorney satisfaction and found some quick and easy tips that are worth sharing.

Controlling certain workplace factors can help to minimize the risk of burnout. In an article published in the Minnesota Bench and Bar, six key controllable factors were identified to help curb attorney dissatisfaction, including: workload/demands; control over work; rewards; community/culture; fairness; and firm values. These probably come as no surprise to many, but addressing these in a meaningful way is likely on a long list of things to do in your spare time. The article has concrete suggestions, such as focusing on rewards and positive feedback (send public praise as routinely as you do reports of hours worked), something easy to do and "psychologically powerful"; creating a team environment and unity of purpose (is everyone "rowing in the same direction?"); and establishing and communicating core values to eliminate internal conflicts with competing interests such as billable hours and pro bono service.

Practical, technical advice included creating email filters to sort urgent matters from those that can wait. If you are like most and have fallen prey to the never-ending email in-box, filters can help. They allow you to break down and sort unmanageable amounts of unread messages into smaller folders categorized by project, priority and context. A few wellspent minutes with your computer tool bar can be a quick solution to email madness. Another time-management tip is to avoid checking personal emails in the morning. Rather, focus your morning and quite possibly your most productive time on the more challenging or difficult matters you don't want to tackle. Getting those out of the way first creates a sense of satisfaction that carries through the day.

Motivational sites had catchier titles such as: "Get Smart!," highlighting the need to create your own self-fulfillment by examining, prioritizing, and re-visiting your personal and professional goals; and "Make Slack!," emphasizing the importance of fostering creative thinking by putting some slack and down time into your schedule. I have often read that a mid-day break is essential to a sharp mind and maintaining focus.

As would be expected, one of my favorite "burnout cures" was as simple as they come: change your mindset and make work fun. While many things are beyond our control, our perception of work is not one of them. We often worry about taking too long socializing in the hallway, sharing a funny story when the work is piled high, or "wasting" time on light-hearted matters that don't require the seriousness that our profession demands. Perception is reality. A positive outlook and some good old-fashioned humor goes a long way toward increasing satisfaction in our practice.

Whether just back from a quick trip or desperately needing one, now is a good time to take a break from your daily routine to make one positive change for you and those around you. The effects of this will last longer than a tan, and you don't even need to take your shoes and belt off.
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  1. Im very happy for you, getting ready to go down that dirt road myself, and im praying for the same outcome, because it IS sometimes in the childs best interest to have visitation with grandparents. Thanks for sharing, needed to hear some positive posts for once.

  2. Been there 4 months with 1 paycheck what can i do

  3. our hoa has not communicated any thing that takes place in their "executive meetings" not executive session. They make decisions in these meetings, do not have an agenda, do not notify association memebers and do not keep general meetings minutes. They do not communicate info of any kind to the member, except annual meeting, nobody attends or votes because they think the board is self serving. They keep a deposit fee from club house rental for inspection after someone uses it, there is no inspection I know becausee I rented it, they did not disclose to members that board memebers would be keeping this money, I know it is only 10 dollars but still it is not their money, they hire from within the board for paid positions, no advertising and no request for bids from anyone else, I atteended last annual meeting, went into executive session to elect officers in that session the president brought up the motion to give the secretary a raise of course they all agreed they hired her in, then the minutes stated that a diffeerent board member motioned to give this raise. This board is very clickish and has done things anyway they pleased for over 5 years, what recourse to members have to make changes in the boards conduct

  4. Where may I find an attorney working Pro Bono? Many issues with divorce, my Disability, distribution of IRA's, property, money's and pressured into agreement by my attorney. Leaving me far less than 5% of all after 15 years of marriage. No money to appeal, disabled living on disability income. Attorney's decision brought forward to judge, no evidence ever to finalize divorce. Just 2 weeks ago. Please help.

  5. For the record no one could answer the equal protection / substantive due process challenge I issued in the first post below. The lawless and accountable only to power bureaucrats never did either. All who interface with the Indiana law examiners or JLAP be warned.

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