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IBA: Indiana Court Official to Lead National Court Organizations

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Lilia G. Judson, executive director of the Indiana Supreme Court Division of State Court Administration, has been elected vice-chair of the Board of Directors of the National Center for State Courts (NCSC). She also has been named president of the Conference of State Court Administrators (COSCA), a national organization that represents the top chief executives of the courts of the 50 states and the U.S. territories, and of which NCSC serves as executive staff. Both positions are one-year terms.

“For more than 30 years, Lilly Judson has worked tirelessly to improve the justice system,” said Mary C. McQueen, NCSC president. “Her commitment to the rule of law and the basic principles of justice and her fervent belief in equal access to justice for everyone has served as an example to her peers across the country, as evidenced by the trust placed in her to lead NCSC and COSCA.”

As the manager of Indiana’s judicial system for 13 years, Judson has overseen programs designed to promote the more efficient administration of justice and increase access to justice for the residents of Indiana. Her office has administrative responsibility over the state’s trial courts, collects data on court volume and workload, and distributes state funding for court operations and programs. Judson also manages the staff of the Indiana Public Defender Commission and Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications, among others, and oversees the $100 million court-system budget. Some of the many accomplishments of her tenure as executive director include the launch of a statewide case management system, the implementation of technology training for judges, and the establishment of a court interpreter program.•

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  1. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  2. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  3. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  4. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  5. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

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