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Judge orders law firms to repay city $453,282

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A Merrillville attorney and three law firms must repay East Chicago a total $453,282 in legal fees they collected for defending former city officials in the Sidewalk Six scandal.

Lake Superior Judge John Pera on Wednesday issued a 10-page order in the case City of East Chicago and George Pabey v. Edwardo Maldonado, et al., No. 45D10-0503-PL-32, ruling that former city controller Edwardo Maldonado illegally paid four law firms that amount in 2004 for defending him and former city councilmen Frank Kollintzas and Joe De La Cruz against federal public corruption charges.

The judge ordered Merrillville practitioner Kevin Milner to repay $47,250; Valparaiso law firm Tsoutsouris & Bertig to repay $51,444; and Chicago law firms Cotsirilos Tighe & Streicker, and Mayer Brown Rowe & Maw to repay $63,923 and $290,665 respectively.

The foundation of this case filed five years ago dates back to 1999, when city officials illegally spent $25.5 million in public funds to repave sidewalks, curbs, and make other improvements in exchange for re-election votes favoring former East Chicago Mayor Robert Pastrick and his allies. That led to the federal criminal convictions of Maldonado, Kollintzas, and De La Cruz in 2004 for misappropriating public money, as well as a civil racketeering suit that resulted in a $108 million judgment against Pastrick and two supporters.

Following the verdict, Maldonado pleaded guilty in federal court that making the payments was a crime and he was ordered to pay $453,282 in restitution; but that money hasn’t been collected as he remains incarcerated until 2014. Kollintzas disappeared prior to his sentencing in 2005 and is believed to be in Greece, while De La Cruz has only recently been released from prison.

On this case, Judge Pera noted that the issue before him was: “Given the clear illegality of the payments, is it appropriate to require those receiving them to give the money back to the City? The city is silent as to any duty of attorneys retained by accused officials to return fees that the city may have paid, and is further silent as to any recourse the City might have against attorneys in such event.”

The judge noted that the Indiana General Assembly hasn’t specifically spoken on this issue, but that he can turn to common law for guidance. He relied on the current draft of the Restatement (Third) of Restitution, as well as caselaw dating back more than a century from inside and outside Indiana.

But Judge Pera wrote that the lawyers who accepted the money from Maldonado “almost before the ink was dry on a U.S. District Court jury verdict” should have realized a city ordinance forbid the payments once the officials were convicted of wrongdoing.

“Their suspicion should have been excited, by appearance and circumstances, that Maldonado was committing a breach of his fiduciary duty as agent for the City,” Judge Pera wrote. “Despite this knowledge, they accepted the payments when they should have refused them. Having notice of the circumstances in which the payments were made, the Attorney Defendants cannot claim protection as innocent third-party creditors.”
 

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  1. Indianapolis employers harassment among minorities AFRICAN Americans needs to be discussed the metro Indianapolis area is horrible when it comes to harassing African American employees especially in the local healthcare facilities. Racially profiling in the workplace is an major issue. Please make it better because I'm many civil rights leaders would come here and justify that Indiana is a state the WORKS only applies to Caucasian Americans especially in Hamilton county. Indiana targets African Americans in the workplace so when governor pence is trying to convince people to vote for him this would be awesome publicity for the Presidency Elections.

  2. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  3. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  4. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  5. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

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