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Leadership in Law 2013: Hon. Lloyd Mark Bailey

Judge, Indiana Court of Appeals, Indianapolis Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

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mark-bailey02-15col.jpg (IL Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Indiana Court of Appeals Judge L. Mark Bailey has come a long way from his college days when he worked as a courier in a law firm to get exposure to the legal system. His career path has taken him from a small firm and a solo practice to serving as an administrative law judge, state trial judge, and now a jurist on the Court of Appeals. Mark, along with Judges John Baker and Edward Najam, initiated the “Appeals on Wheels” project that brings appellate arguments into community settings. While serving on the bench, he has earned his master’s in business administration from Indiana Wesleyan University. He continues to seek out learning opportunities – in 2009, the judge earned a designation as an Advanced Science & Technology Adjudication Resource Center Science and Technology Fellow. Mark’s ability to blend legal, social and public policy analysis is admired by his colleagues.

What civic cause is the most important to you?
Meaningful access to justice.

If you could take a sabbatical from the law for a year to work your fantasy job, what job would you choose?
I would return to the family farm.

In life or law, what bugs you?
A sense by some people that life is just a dress rehearsal which allows them to traipse through it without any sense of personal meaning or purpose.

If you could meet and spend a day with one lawyer from history, who would it be and why?
Thurgood Marshall. I can’t think of a better person to provide unique insight, understanding and perspective on the role of law in our society.

What class in law school did you find the most difficult?
Every class presented its own unique challenges. The goal for me was to master the unique terminology for each subject and to understand its boundaries, history and purpose in our society.

What do you find scary?
Missing a deadline.

If you could go back in time, “when” would you go to and what would you do?
Follow Stephen Decatur to battle in the Barbary Wars on the open seas of North Africa.

What advice would you give your 25-year-old self?
Read Stephen R. Covey’s book, “7 Habits of Highly Effective People” and “prepare to begin!”

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?
Fully understand the reasons for each person’s perspective.

If you could pick a theme song to describe your life, what would it be?
“Bright Side of the Road,” by Van Morrison. From my perspective, the song reflects a great life with my wife of 29 years and counting.

Would a world without 24/7 technology be a good or bad thing?
It is what it is. Just because it’s there doesn’t mean it has to be engaged 24/7.

Numerous TV shows center around lawyers and their practices. Are any of them close to realistic?
“The Good Wife.” It depicts real issues involving lawyers, their clients and their practices. The resolution of those issues is not so realistic. Most legal issues unfold over a period of time, not in an hour from beginning to end including commercial breaks. Additionally, wouldn’t it be nice if we could truly write the script for each client’s case.
 

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  1. IF the Right to Vote is indeed a Right, then it is a RIGHT. That is the same for ALL eligible and properly registered voters. And this is, being able to cast one's vote - until the minute before the polls close in one's assigned precinct. NOT days before by absentee ballot, and NOT 9 miles from one's house (where it might be a burden to get to in time). I personally wait until the last minute to get in line. Because you never know what happens. THAT is my right, and that is Mr. Valenti's. If it is truly so horrible to let him on school grounds (exactly how many children are harmed by those required to register, on school grounds, on election day - seriously!), then move the polling place to a different location. For ALL voters in that precinct. Problem solved.

  2. "associates are becoming more mercenary. The path to partnership has become longer and more difficult so they are chasing short-term gains like high compensation." GOOD FOR THEM! HELL THERE OUGHT TO BE A UNION!

  3. Let's be honest. A glut of lawyers out there, because law schools have overproduced them. Law schools dont care, and big law loves it. So the firms can afford to underpay them. Typical capitalist situation. Wages have grown slowly for entry level lawyers the past 25 years it seems. Just like the rest of our economy. Might as well become a welder. Oh and the big money is mostly reserved for those who can log huge hours and will cut corners to get things handled. More capitalist joy. So the answer coming from the experts is to "capitalize" more competition from nonlawyers, and robots. ie "expert systems." One even hears talk of "offshoring" some legal work. thus undercutting the workers even more. And they wonder why people have been pulling for Bernie and Trump. Hello fools, it's not just the "working class" it's the overly educated suffering too.

  4. And with a whimpering hissy fit the charade came to an end ... http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2016/07/27/all-charges-dropped-against-all-remaining-officers-in-freddie-gray-case/ WHISTLEBLOWERS are needed more than ever in a time such as this ... when politics trump justice and emotions trump reason. Blue Lives Matter.

  5. "pedigree"? I never knew that in order to become a successful or, for that matter, a talented attorney, one needs to have come from good stock. What should raise eyebrows even more than the starting associates' pay at this firm (and ones like it) is the belief systems they subscribe to re who is and isn't "fit" to practice law with them. Incredible the arrogance that exists throughout the practice of law in this country, especially at firms like this one.

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