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Opinions Sept. 30, 2013

September 30, 2013
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Opinions, Sept. 30, 2013

Indiana Court of Appeals
Jeffrey Archer v. State of Indiana

49A05-1209-CR-448
Criminal. Affirms Class A felony conviction of child molestation, rejecting arguments that the trial court’s statement about the victim’s competency was an impermissible vouching statement and that the court improperly allowed vouching statements by multiple witnesses. The court’s denial of Archer’s request to present evidence of the victim’s post-allegation demeanor also was proper, as were jury instructions and the effectiveness of Archer’s trial counsel.

Paul J. Livers II, v. State of Indiana
06A01-1303-CR-119
Criminal. Affirms convictions for battery causing bodily injury, a Class A misdemeanor, and interference with reporting a crime, a Class C misdemeanor. Livers claims his counsel was ineffective because the attorney failed to file a motion for a jury trial in a timely manner. The COA finds the trial court record does not indicate that Livers wanted a jury trial prior to his trial counsel’s belated requested. Also rejects Livers’ argument that the testimony of the victim was incredibly dubious.

Joseph M. Guinn v. Applied Composites Engineering, Inc.
49A02-1303-CC-239
Civil. Reverses grant of summary judgment in favor of Applied Composites Engineering Inc., and remands to the trial court for consideration of Joseph Guinn’s claim of tortious interference with a contract due to ACE’s enforcement of a non-compete clause that resulted in his termination from a subsequent employer. Summary judgment was improper because a genuine issue of material fact exists as to whether ACE’s conduct was justified, fair or reasonable under the circumstances.

Amy Palmer v. Margaret Sales and Unique Insurance Company
45A03-1302-SC-31
Small claims. Reverses denial of motion for change of judge and motion for jury trial and remands with instructions to grant change of judge, implement procedures for the selection of a new judge and transfer the case to the plenary docket, the majority holding that the question of timeliness of a change of judge request should be guided by the dissenting opinion in McClure v. Cooper, 893 N.E.2d 337 (Ind. Ct. App. 2008). Judge Mark Bailey, who wrote the McClure opinion, dissented in part, finding that the court shouldn’t reach McClure, which he acknowledged may have been wrongly decided, and that because Palmer acknowledged liability, proceedings on remand should be limited to the matter of damages.

William A. Asher v. Stephanie J. Coomler
49A04-1302-DR-71
Domestic relation. Reverses trial court modification of child support, holding that a magistrate was not within the class of judicial officers specified in Trial Rules for selection of a special judge and therefore could not have presided after appointment of a special judge. Remands to the trial court with instructions to permit the parties to select a successor special judge.

David M. Green v. State of Indiana
45A03-1210-PC-418
Post-conviction. Affirms denial of petition for post-conviction relief from his sentence of two consecutive 45-year sentences for his conviction of two counts of murder, concluding that a defense attorney’s failure to object to an anonymous jury was not ineffective assistance of counsel.

Tom Trisler d/b/a Canal House Antiques v. Clayton L. Carter
35A02-1302-SC-192
Small claim. Reverses the trial court’s order that Trisler reimburse Carter the purchase price for a chest of drawers. Rules when Carter bought the piece of furniture at the antiques store, he did not expect the business would remedy any defect. Consequently he has no legitimate reason to revoke his acceptance of the chest of drawers.

Gary Oswalt v. State of Indiana
35A02-1208-CR-684
Criminal. Affirms conviction and aggregate sentence of 84 years for two counts of child molesting as Class A felonies, child solicitation as a Class D felony, and five counts of possession of child pornography as Class D felonies. Rules Oswalt did not exhaust his peremptory challenges and therefore waived review of the trial court’s denial of his request to strike Juror No. 28 for cause. Finds the five charges for possession of child pornography fell within the statutory limitations period. Concludes that the evidence was sufficient to sustain Oswalt’s convictions for five counts of possession of child pornography and that Oswalt failed to demonstrate he was denied a fair trial due to the charges of possession of child pornography. Upholds the sentence as appropriate considering the nature of the offense and the character of Oswalt.

In the Matter of the Termination of the Parent-Child Relationship of K.C., R.C., and B.C., Minor Children and R.C., Father v. Indiana Department of Child Services (NFP)
72A01-1301-JT-35
Juvenile. Affirms involuntary termination of R.C.’s (father) parental rights to K.C., R.C. and B.C.

Joseph A. Taylor v. Dr. William H. Wolfe, in his Individual Capacity as an Employee of Corizon and Medical Director at the Pendleton Correctional Facility, Corizon, Inc., and Pharma Corr, (NFP)
48A05-1212-PL-638
Civil Plenary. Affirms dismissal of Taylor’s complaint against Wolfe, Corizon Inc. and Pharma Corr for lack of subject matter jurisdiction.

In the Matter of; H.B., G.M., P.M., and A.C. (Minors), C.M. (Mother) v. The Indiana Department of Child Services and Lake County Court Appointed Special Advocate (NFP)
45A03-1302-JT-62
Juvenile. Affirms order terminating C.M.’s (mother) parental rights to her minor children, H.B., G.M., P.M. and A.C.

Gerald W. Staton v. Dawn M. Dobyns-Gross, Indiana Family Social Services Administration, Tippecanoe County, Indiana and Tippecanoe County Prosecutor (NFP)
79A02-1305-CT-412
Civil Tort. Affirms denial of Staton’s motion to correct error and the dismissal of Staton’s complaint.

Mark Burkett v. State of Indiana (NFP)
09A04-1305-CR-262
Criminal. Affirms 20-year sentence for criminal confinement, a Class B felony.

Brandon Stewart v. State of Indiana (NFP)
45A03-1301-CR-6
Criminal. Affirms conviction for two counts child molesting, both Class A felonies, one count sexual misconduct with a minor, a Class B felony, one count child molesting, a Class C felony, and one count sexual misconduct with a minor, a Class C felony. Also affirms aggregate sentence of 46 years.
 
The Indiana Supreme Court and the Indiana Tax Court issued no opinions by IL deadline. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals issued no Indiana opinions by IL deadline.
 

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  1. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  2. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  3. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  4. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  5. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

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