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Man who sped through construction zone loses appeal

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A man who a state trooper stopped for following too closely through an Interstate 70 construction zone lost his appeal arguing that admission of evidence violated the Fourth Amendment and was fundamental error.

After Kevin Mamon was stopped, Indiana State Police trooper Matthew Wilson said he appeared intoxicated and produced an ID card when asked for his license. As the trooper was verifying that Mamon had a suspended license, Mamon exited his Jeep and began walking along the side of the road, according to the record.

Wilson repeatedly ordered Mamon back in his vehicle, and after he ultimately complied, he sped away, driving up to 80 mph through the work zone, “running people off the road,” and forcing the trooper to end pursuit because of the danger. Mamon was arrested by other troopers.

Mamon appealed his conviction of Class D felony resisting law enforcement, Class A misdemeanor criminal recklessness and Class B misdemeanor reckless driving and enhancement for being a habitual offender. He had failed to preserve an objection to admission of evidence, so he asked the panel to find fundamental error.

The panel declined, relying on Brown v. State, 929 N.E.2d 204, 207 (Ind. 2010).

“(W)here there is ‘no claim of fabrication of evidence or willful malfeasance on the part of the investigating officers and no contention that the evidence is not what it appears to be,’ the claimed error in admission is not fundamental,” Senior Judge Randall Shepard wrote in Kevin J. Mamon v. State of Indiana, 30A01-1301-CR-47.

“In the current case, as in Brown, there is no claim of evidence fabrication or willful malfeasance on the part of law enforcement. To the contrary, Mamon argues Wilson merely misunderstood the law governing tailgating. Mamon does not dispute the truth of Wilson’s testimony and related exhibits. Like the Supreme Court in Brown, we see no grounds for reversal.”

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  1. Is it possible to amend an order for child support due to false paternity?

  2. He did not have an "unlicensed handgun" in his pocket. Firearms are not licensed in Indiana. He apparently possessed a handgun without a license to carry, but it's not the handgun that is licensed (or registered).

  3. Once again, Indiana's legislature proves how friendly it is to monopolies. This latest bill by Hershman demonstrates the lengths Indiana's representatives are willing to go to put big business's (especially utilities') interests above those of everyday working people. Maassal argues that if the technology (solar) is so good, it will be able to compete on its own. Too bad he doesn't feel the same way about the industries he represents. Instead, he wants to cut the small credit consumers get for using solar in order to "add a 'level of certainty'" to his industry. I haven't heard of or seen such a blatant money-grab by an industry since the days when our federal, state, and local governments were run by the railroad. Senator Hershman's constituents should remember this bill the next time he runs for office, and they should penalize him accordingly.

  4. From his recent appearance on WRTV to this story here, Frank is everywhere. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy, although he should stop using Eric Schnauffer for his 7th Circuit briefs. They're not THAT hard.

  5. They learn our language prior to coming here. My grandparents who came over on the boat, had to learn English and become familiarize with Americas customs and culture. They are in our land now, speak ENGLISH!!

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