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Ex-officer for MCBA may lose law license

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Members and officers of the Marion County Bar Association say the organization has put behind it the theft and subsequent repayment of more than $10,000 by its former treasurer.
 

atkins Atkins

Trezanay Atkins admitted in a hearing before the Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission that she misappropriated money during her tenure as treasurer of the Indianapolis-based bar whose mission is the professional development of minority attorneys. The commission asserts that from October 2011 through December 2012, Atkins converted to her personal use 53 bar association checks she wrote ranging from $15 to $500, totaling $10,373.

“I was in personal financial distress,” Atkins testified at a hearing this year when asked why one check was written for an unusually specific amount – $456.12. “I didn’t have any money to take care of even my kids … and so the reason why it is for an odd number is because those were bills that I needed to pay in my house,” she stated.

In March 2013, Atkins self-reported the misappropriations to then-MCBA President TaKeena Thompson, who said the organization moved swiftly, removing Atkins from the treasurer position. Thompson, an associate at Cohen & Malad LLP, said that within a week of the disclosure, members were notified of the situation, and Atkins promptly returned the money. Atkins said she received a loan to repay most of the money.

“We told (members) that we apologized … we didn’t try to hide it,” Thompson said, noting the association also quickly changed its banking procedures, requiring multiple signatures on checks, for instance. She said of members, “I think they were confident in our board and that we would do everything that we could to make sure this never happened again.”

The association filed a grievance against Atkins that served as the basis of the disciplinary complaint against her, and the MCBA board voted to refer the case to the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office, though no charges had been filed as of May 31.

Atkins, who was admitted to practice in 2009, told Indiana Lawyer she is resigned to the likelihood that she may temporarily lose her law license. She admitted in her disciplinary action that she committed acts amounting to Class A misdemeanor conversion. The month she became treasurer, she sent board members an email that the organization was “hemorrhaging financially,” the record shows.

Atkins told IL the MCBA’s records were in disarray when she became treasurer. Marion Superior Judge Helen Marchal, the hearing officer in Atkins’ case, found that an aggravating factor was that the MCBA was a vulnerable victim.

Marchal submitted a report to the Supreme Court in May finding Atkins violated Rules of Professional Conduct 8.4(b) and 8.4(c). Marchal recommended a one-year suspension without automatic reinstatement. The Disciplinary Commission previously urged a two-year suspension.

Along with a violation for misappropriating funds, Atkins also tried to conceal the thefts. For instance, she made notations in memo lines of checks that the money was for false purposes, and she also provided summaries to the board with incorrect balances.

In November 2012, she reported to the board that the association had a balance of just over $19,900, when the actual balance was less than $9,700, according to the disciplinary record. The ledger didn’t include the checks she’d written for herself.

Members and officers of the association said they were disheartened by the misappropriations that came as the organization had become more active than it had been for several years. It hosted a successful retirement celebration for Court of Appeals Senior Judge Carr Darden and instituted regular “coffee chats” enabling members to meet informally with local judges.


bentley-cassandra.jpg Bentley

Cassandra Bentley, president of the Marion County Bar Association, said the facts in Atkins’ complaint speak for themselves: “It’s been resolved and we are moving on.

“From our end of things, we turned it over to the prosecutor’s office, and whatever they decided to do with it, that’s what they decided to do with it,” said Bentley, a law clerk for Judge Tanya Walton Pratt of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.

“It was an unfortunate situation and we handled it appropriately,” Bentley said. She doesn’t believe the MCBA has been damaged because of the situation.

“We’re still a functioning and valuable part of the legal community,” she said. The group plans to conduct a membership drive in September and is working on other initiatives.


McMillian McMillian

MCBA past president, life member and Barnes & Thornburg LLP partner Jimmie McMillian Jr. said he wouldn’t comment on Atkins, but agreed the organization had moved on.

“It takes a lot to do it and to do it right and do it well,” he said of leading an organization that relies entirely on volunteers. But he said its mission remains vital.

“I think it’s important to have a network for lawyers, particularly lawyers of color, to get plugged in and get connected in groups they feel comfortable and welcome in,” McMillian said. It’s also important for groups like MCBA to share in the successes of members who have a commonality of purpose, he added.

McMillian was mentored by MCBA members, and he’s had the opportunity to mentor others in the organization that he indicated has nearly 200 members.

“We have the same diversity challenges in the legal community we have for years,” he said, though corporate America, courts and government see diversity in the profession as a goal. “We are better served by a diverse bar. It better represents the community we serve.”

An influential member who spoke on condition of anonymity said the organization is likely to focus on its basic mission of helping students study for the bar exam and assisting young lawyers advance in the local legal community, likely deferring any initiatives until late summer.

Atkins spoke to IL after Marchal’s report was transmitted to the Supreme Court. She said she sensed tension between younger and older MCBA members, a view some members contacted for this story shared but others did not.

Thompson, now immediate past-president, said the MCBA made strides to improve communication with members and offer more activities. She said some members had not paid dues in the past because they didn’t receive invoices, and those were the kind of issues the leadership addressed.

“We were trying to get all of our processes in order, and not everything was up to par,” Thompson said of the board under her direction. “I definitely think it was an accomplishment for the board to have as much activity as we had. We had an increase in membership and active members, and I think the board did a good job.”

In Thompson’s estimation, that includes dealing with the fallout from Atkins’ misappropriation.

“Do I think those things are being overshadowed? I don’t think so,” she said.

Atkins said she’s shutting down her law practice and isn’t accepting new clients. She hopes to keep her license active after her discipline case is concluded, but she doesn’t intend to practice. Instead, she’s turning her attention to a new enterprise, Ignis Strategic Communications, a public relations company whose Twitter page reads, “between you and the media stands Ignis. We handle crisis | reputation | strategy | press.”•

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  1. What is the one thing the Hoosier legal status quo hates more than a whistleblower? A lawyer whistleblower taking on the system man to man. That must never be rewarded, must always, always, always be punished, lest the whole rotten tree be felled.

  2. I want to post this to keep this tread alive and hope more of David's former clients might come forward. In my case, this coward of a man represented me from June 2014 for a couple of months before I fired him. I knew something was wrong when he blatantly lied about what he had advised me in my contentious and unfortunate divorce trial. His impact on the proceedings cast a very long shadow and continues to impact me after a lengthy 19 month divorce. I would join a class action suit.

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  4. Dear Fan, let me help you correct the title to your post. "ACLU is [Left] most of the time" will render it accurate. Just google it if you doubt that I am, err, "right" about this: "By the mid-1930s, Roger Nash Baldwin had carved out a well-established reputation as America’s foremost civil libertarian. He was, at the same time, one of the nation’s leading figures in left-of-center circles. Founder and long time director of the American Civil Liberties Union, Baldwin was a firm Popular Fronter who believed that forces on the left side of the political spectrum should unite to ward off the threat posed by right-wing aggressors and to advance progressive causes. Baldwin’s expansive civil liberties perspective, coupled with his determined belief in the need for sweeping socioeconomic change, sometimes resulted in contradictory and controversial pronouncements. That made him something of a lightning rod for those who painted the ACLU with a red brush." http://www.harvardsquarelibrary.org/biographies/roger-baldwin-2/ "[George Soros underwrites the ACLU' which It supports open borders, has rushed to the defense of suspected terrorists and their abettors, and appointed former New Left terrorist Bernardine Dohrn to its Advisory Board." http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/viewSubCategory.asp?id=1237 "The creation of non-profit law firms ushered in an era of progressive public interest firms modeled after already established like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People ("NAACP") and the American Civil Liberties Union ("ACLU") to advance progressive causes from the environmental protection to consumer advocacy." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cause_lawyering

  5. Mr. Foltz: Your comment that the ACLU is "one of the most wicked and evil organizations in existence today" clearly shows you have no real understanding of what the ACLU does for Americans. The fact that the state is paying out so much in legal fees to the ACLU is clear evidence the ACLU is doing something right, defending all of us from laws that are unconstitutional. The ACLU is the single largest advocacy group for the US Constitution. Every single citizen of the United States owes some level of debt to the ACLU for defending our rights.

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