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IndyBar: Interrogatories - Eric Schmadeke

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By Tyler D. Helmond, Voyles Zahn & Paul

Eric Schmadeke
Densborn Blachly LLP

He is a graduate of Indiana University and the IU McKinney School of Law. He was a Marion County Deputy Prosecutor before joining Densborn Blachly LLP. He is a 2013 Indiana Lawyer “Up and Coming Lawyer.” He is Eric Schmadeke, and he has been served with interrogatories.

Q:You recently transitioned from prosecuting criminal cases to civil litigation in private practice. What has been the hardest part about that?
A:Without a doubt – sitting down and typing.  Trials and contested hearings were once the routine; now it feels like I am going out for ice cream every time I get to argue on my feet. The rule jockeying which seems to plague civil litigation can become a little arduous at times too.  I really believe good outcomes would happen more often for our clients if we all focused on the merits a little more and rules ending in something like (m)(38)(P)(xxi) a little less.   

Q:…and the easiest part?
A:Transitioning from a job where I was surrounded by incredibly talented, hard-working and honest lawyers who would rather be hit by a bus than let down their victims, to a job where I am surrounded by incredibly talented, hard-working and honest lawyers who would rather be hit by a bus than let down their clients.

Q:Your office is now on the north side instead of downtown. What are your feelings about that?
A:Densborn Blachly LLP built a first-class modern law office as appealing and fun to work in as any other I have ever seen, and it is quite nice to walk into a place like that every day.  It also happens to be on the north side where I have grown up and currently reside, along with a lot of our clients too. 

On the other hand, I do miss the energy of downtown.  There was always just a touch of excitement that came with the uncertainty of what you might see that day, good or bad.  Am I going to be accosted by a vagabond whose breath smells like after-shave or see a couple silently and tearfully embrace on the sidewalk after learning their adoption has just been finalized?  Or both?  You never knew.  That is what I miss. 

Q:Describe your technology setup.
A:Smart phone, laptop, and docking station with dual monitors.  Big fan of the dual monitors.  Densborn Blachly LLP also makes use of cutting-edge practice management technologies that utilize the cloud.  The firm decided to make a commitment to staying ahead of the tech curve.  So far, that bet has paid off big time for us and our clients. 

Q:If you could bring one historically notable dead person back to life, who would it be and why?
A:Mark Twain.  He said of Jane Austen, “Every time I read ‘Pride and Prejudice,’ I want to dig her up and hit her over the skull with her own shin-bone.”  If that is how he reviewed a novel about manners, I am dying to know what he would have to say regarding the 113th United States Congress, or TMZ.com.  It would also be fun to ask him why he kept reading ‘Pride and Prejudice.’

Q:Who is the most challenging judge you have practiced before?
A:Tough one.  It would be easier to name judges who would describe my practice before them as “most challenging.”   By the way, did you choose an adjective that means both inspiring and impudent on purpose?  If so, well played – but I am not biting. 

Q:You have tried more than 75 juries in a relatively short career, and rumor has it, you are pretty hard to beat.  What’s the secret?
A:First, there is no secret.  I am merely the common denominator.  It is truly the work of the investigators, paralegals, expert witnesses, administrative staff and co-counsel who have supported, taught and tolerated me over the years who won these cases.  Second, I would like to ask my grandmother to stop spreading rumors.

However, imagining for the moment that there is a “secret” recipe to win juries, I suspect it would read something like:

Six parts – good facts;
Five parts – preparation;
Four parts – co-counsel and support staff (only the finest quality);
Three parts – jury selection;
Two parts – persuasive story-telling and the cogent use of analogies to make relevant facts relatable;
One part – Providence, and –
A dash of pluck.

Q:What is your favorite Indiana craft beer?
A:Sun King: Cream Ale on the golf course or Indians Lager at the ballpark.•

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  • Hero
    My daughter called Mr Schmadeke a super hero in a tie after he successfully prosecuted a very evil man. We wish him great success in his private practice.

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  1. Im very happy for you, getting ready to go down that dirt road myself, and im praying for the same outcome, because it IS sometimes in the childs best interest to have visitation with grandparents. Thanks for sharing, needed to hear some positive posts for once.

  2. Been there 4 months with 1 paycheck what can i do

  3. our hoa has not communicated any thing that takes place in their "executive meetings" not executive session. They make decisions in these meetings, do not have an agenda, do not notify association memebers and do not keep general meetings minutes. They do not communicate info of any kind to the member, except annual meeting, nobody attends or votes because they think the board is self serving. They keep a deposit fee from club house rental for inspection after someone uses it, there is no inspection I know becausee I rented it, they did not disclose to members that board memebers would be keeping this money, I know it is only 10 dollars but still it is not their money, they hire from within the board for paid positions, no advertising and no request for bids from anyone else, I atteended last annual meeting, went into executive session to elect officers in that session the president brought up the motion to give the secretary a raise of course they all agreed they hired her in, then the minutes stated that a diffeerent board member motioned to give this raise. This board is very clickish and has done things anyway they pleased for over 5 years, what recourse to members have to make changes in the boards conduct

  4. Where may I find an attorney working Pro Bono? Many issues with divorce, my Disability, distribution of IRA's, property, money's and pressured into agreement by my attorney. Leaving me far less than 5% of all after 15 years of marriage. No money to appeal, disabled living on disability income. Attorney's decision brought forward to judge, no evidence ever to finalize divorce. Just 2 weeks ago. Please help.

  5. For the record no one could answer the equal protection / substantive due process challenge I issued in the first post below. The lawless and accountable only to power bureaucrats never did either. All who interface with the Indiana law examiners or JLAP be warned.

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