IndyBar: Straight Talk Straight from the Top

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Members of the current IndyBar Board of Directors discuss their roles, responsibilities and also offer advice to those considering serving on the board in 2015. Today’s edition features Magistrate Jason Reyome of Marion Superior Court and Thomas Barnard of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, who both serve as At-Large board members.

Here’s what they had to say about their position on the board and what others considering nomination should expect.

“Wallflowers need not apply”

Magistrate Jason Reyome, Marion Superior Court

Board position: At-Large Member

Board member: 5 years

IndyBar member: 17 years

What does an At-Large member do?

reyome-jason-iba.jpg Reyome

I attend monthly board meetings, meetings of the members and I also try to attend as many section events as I can. As Board Liaison to the Criminal Justice Section and the ADR Section, I offer a direct line of communication to the board for the sections I serve. Generally, I work to further the IndyBar mission: to serve our members, promote justice and enhance the legal profession.

Describe the board in a few words: Extremely organized, efficient and effective.

What piece of advice would you give to those considering joining the board?

I would share a modified version of the advice I was given when first asked to serve: Wallflowers need not apply. The current board members are active and engaged. Service on the board can be a lot of work, but it is well worth it. IndyBar staff and our executive director are fantastic. Let them help you. If you have questions, ask. If you have ideas, develop and share them.

Why should someone want to be on the board?

The applicants selected will have the opportunity to collaborate and develop lifelong friendships with some of the most interesting and talented people in the Indianapolis legal community.

“Go for it!”
Thomas Barnard, Partner at Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP

Board position: At-Large Member

Board member: Two years

IndyBar member: 34 years

What does an At-Large member do?

barnard-thomas-iba.jpg Barnard

Prepare for, attend and participate in monthly board meetings, as well as respond to interim issues involving board consideration (such as potential amicus briefs and legislative proposals).

What will you miss most about being on the board?

Witnessing and being a part of the collective intelligence and wisdom of the IndyBar staff and board members. All of us, as members of IndyBar and the Indiana Bar in general, should be proud of the diligence, sincerity and creative tenacity of this board. Without exception, I have departed each board meeting feeling enriched, having heard some of Indiana’s most respected judges, attorneys and executive staff share ideas and insights. I have been particularly impressed with the leadership and inclusiveness of the board, where difficult issues facing the legal profession, bar organizations and the general public are addressed with the benefit of experience, intelligence and compassion. Every board member’s viewpoint is respected and valued, and this culture encourages


 productive discussion. In addition, board members are constantly invited to think outside the box and consider cutting edge technologies, embrace new perspectives on service delivery and strive for new and increasing value for IndyBar members.

What piece of advice would you give to those considering joining the board?

Go for it! The board contains a unique combination of history, innovation and stability. You will value your time on the board, and the board will value your time.

Why should someone want to be on the board?

Where else can you witness a nationally renowned executive staff assist some of our state’s leading judges and attorneys discuss and take positions on some of the most pressing issues affecting our beloved profession? If you want to make a positive difference in your own practice while also enriching the lives of fellow attorneys, there is no better place to start.

Any other info you’d like to share about Board of Directors?

I am very fortunate to have fostered and deepened friendships through my board experience.•


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  1. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  2. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  3. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  4. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.

  5. rensselaer imdiana is doing same thing to children from the judge to attorney and dfs staff they need to be investigated as well