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SCOTUS won't take Indiana bar exam case

October 11, 2011

The Supreme Court of the United States has declined to take several Indiana cases, including a federal suit against the state’s Board of Law Examiners filed by a man who wants to take the bar exam without going to law school.

An order list released this morning includes cases that the Supreme Court considered at its conference on Friday, and nine cases from Indiana are included.

The court declined to take Clarence Carter v. Chief Justice and Justices of the Indiana Supreme Court, et al., No. 11-5684, which comes from the Southern District of Indiana. U.S. Judge Tanya Walton Pratt earlier this year dismissed the lawsuit, which claimed that the state justices and BLE violated Clarence Carter’s constitutional rights to due process and equal protection to sit for the bar exam in Indiana. Administrative Rule 13 requires that person attend law school to sit for the bar exam, and Carter alleged that requirement arbitrarily excluded him from the chance to qualify to practice in this state.

The SCOTUS also denied: Anthony E. Moore v. U.S., No. 11-6244; Ty Brock v. U.S., No. 11-6308; Patrick Thelen v. William A. Sherrod, No. 11-6334; Anthony L. Fletcher v. U.S., No. 10-10562; Richard Wallace v. United States, No. 11-251; Antonio Kendrick v. Marcus Hardy, No. 11-5621; and Roger Yeadon, Jr. v. Harley G. Lappin, Director, Federal Bureau of Prisons, et al., No. 11-6024.

The justices are expected to consider at least three more Indiana cases.
 

Marcus Hardy v. Irving Cross, No. 11-74, has not been denied by SCOTUS, as the story originally stated. This story has been corrected.

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