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Attorney dies following sudden illness

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An attorney whose family has practiced law in Northwest Indiana since 1916 died Feb. 12 after a brief illness.

Patrick Galvin, 69, spent more than 40 years as an attorney at the firm Galvin Galvin and Leeney, which became Krieg DeVault in Schererville.

Galvin grew up in Northwest Indiana and was raised by his father after his mother died when Galvin was 6. Cal Bellamy, a partner at Krieg DeVault, said up until Galvin's death, there was almost 100 years of law practiced by the Galvin family in the region. Galvin's father, uncle, and older brother all practiced together at the firm. Galvin graduated from Georgetown University Law Center with his J.D. in 1964 and his LL.M. in taxation in 1965.

"The one thing that was outstanding about Pat was the fact he was able to blend a highly intelligent and knowledgeable law practice with the involvement in the community," said Bellamy, who has know Galvin for 30 years. "He served many charities in leadership positions and always without any motive other than promoting the charity."

Galvin was an active leader with the Carmelite Home for Boys, Tradewinds Rehabilitation Center, Catholic Charities, Northwest Indiana Symphony, and was a founding member and board member of the James W. and Betty Dye Scholarship Foundation, which provides scholarships to high school students to attend college.

Galvin, whose practice focused on estate work, real estate, and banking, was a former president of the Hammond Bar Association, which merged with the Lake County Bar Association, and a member of the Lake County, Indiana State, and American bar associations.

Bellamy said Galvin had gone to visit his daughter in New York last week when he became ill. He returned to his home in Chicago and went to the hospital where an infection that couldn't be controlled was discovered.

"He was a great guy, enjoyed life, and everybody enjoyed being around him," Bellamy said.

Calvin is survived by his wife, daughter, grandson, nieces, and grandnieces and nephews. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Feb. 18 at St. Joseph Church, 5310 S. Hohman Ave., Hammond, with a reception to follow immediately at the Performing Arts Center, 1040 Ridge Road, Munster. All are encouraged to attend; in lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Catholic Charities Diocese of Gary.

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  4. Law school is social control the goal to produce a social product. As such it began after the Revolution and has nearly ruined us to this day: "“Scarcely any political question arises in the United States which is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question. Hence all parties are obliged to borrow, in their daily controversies, the ideas, and even the language, peculiar to judicial proceedings. As most public men [i.e., politicians] are, or have been, legal practitioners, they introduce the customs and technicalities of their profession into the management of public affairs. The jury extends this habitude to all classes. The language of the law thus becomes, in some measure, a vulgar tongue; the spirit of the law, which is produced in the schools and courts of justice, gradually penetrates beyond their walls into the bosom of society, where it descends to the lowest classes, so that at last the whole people contract the habits and the tastes of the judicial magistrate.” ? Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

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