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2 attorneys to argue for same-sex marriage before 7th Circuit

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In a rare move, two attorneys will share the podium and argue before the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals that Indiana’s law defining marriage as only between one man and one woman is unconstitutional.

The federal appellate court in Chicago will hear arguments in Indiana’s and Wisconsin’s same-sex marriage cases Aug. 26. The court added the day to its calendar especially for the marriage lawsuits.

The parties in the Indiana case will start the court session at 9:30 a.m. (CDT).

Three cases from Indiana – Baskin, et al. v. Bogan, et al., brought by Lambda Legal; Fujii, et al. v. Commissioner, et al., brought by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana; and Lee, at al. v. Abbott, et al., brought by a group of attorneys led by William Groth – were consolidated and will be presented in one argument.

Since three cases are challenging Indiana’s law, Ken Falk, legal director of the ACLU of Indiana, said splitting the arguments between different attorneys made sense. He has shared arguments in other cases but Falk admitted the practice is “relatively rare.”

Falk and Camilla Taylor, marriage project director for Lambda Legal, will argue on behalf of the Indiana same-sex couples. Taylor will be at the podium for eight minutes and Falk for 12 minutes.

Prior to their appearance at the 7th Circuit, the same-sex couples’ attorneys will be mooting the case in a videoconference.

Indiana Solicitor General Thomas Fisher, who has defended the state’s marriage law since the lawsuits were filed in March, will deliver the argument for the state.
 

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  1. The Conour embarrassment is an example of why it would be a good idea to NOT name public buildings or to erect monuments to "worthy" people until AFTER they have been dead three years, at least. And we also need to stop naming federal buildings and roads after a worthless politician whose only achievement was getting elected multiple times (like a certain Congressman after whom we renamed the largest post office in the state). Also, why have we renamed BOTH the Center Township government center AND the new bus terminal/bum hangout after Julia Carson?

  2. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  3. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

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