MichaelJ.Hebenstreit

Recent Articles

Hebenstreit: Thanks

January 4, 2012
Three hundred sixty five days sounds like a long time, but 2011 has flown by very quickly. This is my last column in Indiana Lawyer.
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Hebenstreit: FIGHT ON!

December 21, 2011
Less than 24 hours ago, I knew exactly what my topic for this column was going to be.
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Hebenstreit: Making a Difference in a Child's Life

December 7, 2011
IndyBar President Michael Hebenstreit writes about volunteering to be a child advocate or guardian ad litem.
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Hebenstreit: Judicial Elections Just Around the Corner

November 23, 2011
IBA President Michael Hebenstreit recognizes that the elections are over and everyone wants to get back to normal life again … but the process is beginning again.
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Hebenstreit: Too Many Clients?

November 9, 2011
Do you have too many clients? If so, you can probably skip this article; but, if not please read on.
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Hebenstreit: FLYING SOLO????!!!!!

October 26, 2011
In the current legal market, there are many lawyers, both new and more experienced, who find that they have to "go it on their own."
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Hebenstreit: With a Need so Great, What Will We Do?

October 12, 2011
We all know what pro bono legal service means and probably know or believe that it is a good idea. But have you ever thought about how it actually works?
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Hebenstreit: Lawyers and the Election Process

September 28, 2011
In 2010, 61.2% of Hoosiers were registered to vote which placed us in 43rd place in the United States. We were even worse in voter turnout. Only 39.4% of Indiana residents actually voted in the 2010 elections which placed us in 48th position. The national average was 45.4%—a full six points higher than Indiana was able to muster.
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Hebenstreit: Collaborating to Provide Services for All

September 14, 2011
Service has always been important, but in today’s frenetic world, receiving good and prompt service is critical.
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IBA Editorial: Court Funding in Critical Condition Nationwide

August 31, 2011
One of the corner stones of our American system of jurisprudence is free and open access to the trial courts and judicial system. The ability of businesses to solve their disputes in an orderly fashion and the predictability of outcomes encourages business to be conducted in our country.
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  1. This is easily remedied, and in a fashion that every church sacrificing incense for its 501c3 status and/or graveling for government grants should have no problem with ..... just add this statue, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capitoline_she-wolf_Musei_Capitolini_MC1181.jpg entitled, "Jesus and Cousin John learn to suckle sustenance from the beloved Nanny State." Heckfire, the ACLU might even help move the statue in place then. And the art will certainly reflect our modern life, given the clergy's full-bellied willingness to accede to every whim of the new caesars. If any balk, just threaten to take away their government milk … they will quiet down straightaway, I assure you. Few, if any of them, are willing to cross the ruling elite as did the real J&J

  2. Tina has left the building.

  3. Is JLAP and its bevy of social "scientists" the cure to every ailment of the modern practitioner? I see no allegations as to substance abuse, but I sure see a judge who has seemingly let power go to her head and who lacks any appreciation for the rule of law. Seems that she needs help in her legal philosophy and judicial restraint, not some group encounter session to affirm she is OK, we are OK. Can’t we lawyers just engage in peer professionalism and even peer pressure anymore? Need we social workers to tell us it is wrong to violate due process? And if we conduct ourselves with the basic respect for the law shown by most social workers .... it that good enough in Indiana? If not, then how is JLAP to help this 2003 law school grad get what her law school evidently failed to teach her? (In addition .... rhetorical question … I have a theory that the LAP model serves as a conduit for governmental grace when the same strict application of the law visited upon the poor and the powerless just will not do. See in the records of this paper ... can the argument be made that many who save their licenses, reputations, salaries by calling upon that font of grace are receiving special treatment? Who tracks the application of said grace to assure that EP and DP standards are fully realized? Does the higher one climbs inside the Beltway bring greater showers of grace? Should such grace be the providence of the government, or the churches and NGO's? Why, we would not want to be found mixing the remnants of our abandoned faith with the highest loyalty to the secularist state, now would we?)

  4. Is JLAP and its bevy of social "scientists" the cure to every ailment of the modern practitioner? I see no allegations as to substance abuse, but I sure see a judge who has seemingly let power go to her head and who lacks any appreciation for the rule of law. Seems that she needs help in her legal philosophy and judicial restraint, not some group encounter session to affirm she is OK, we are OK. Cannot we lawyers not engage in peer professionalism and even pressure anymore? Need we social workers to tell us it is wrong to violate due process? And if we conduct ourselves with the basis respect for the law shown by most social workers .... it that good enough in Indiana?

  5. Judge Baker nails it: "Russell was in a place he did not have a right to be, to take an action he did not have a right to take. Russell neglected to leave that property even after engaging in a heated argument with and being struck with a broom handle by the property owner." AS is noted below ... sad to think that the next shoe to drop will be the thief suing the car owner. That is justice?

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