MichaelJ.Hebenstreit

Recent Articles

Hebenstreit: Thanks

January 4, 2012
Three hundred sixty five days sounds like a long time, but 2011 has flown by very quickly. This is my last column in Indiana Lawyer.
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Hebenstreit: FIGHT ON!

December 21, 2011
Less than 24 hours ago, I knew exactly what my topic for this column was going to be.
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Hebenstreit: Making a Difference in a Child's Life

December 7, 2011
IndyBar President Michael Hebenstreit writes about volunteering to be a child advocate or guardian ad litem.
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Hebenstreit: Judicial Elections Just Around the Corner

November 23, 2011
IBA President Michael Hebenstreit recognizes that the elections are over and everyone wants to get back to normal life again … but the process is beginning again.
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Hebenstreit: Too Many Clients?

November 9, 2011
Do you have too many clients? If so, you can probably skip this article; but, if not please read on.
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Hebenstreit: FLYING SOLO????!!!!!

October 26, 2011
In the current legal market, there are many lawyers, both new and more experienced, who find that they have to "go it on their own."
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Hebenstreit: With a Need so Great, What Will We Do?

October 12, 2011
We all know what pro bono legal service means and probably know or believe that it is a good idea. But have you ever thought about how it actually works?
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Hebenstreit: Lawyers and the Election Process

September 28, 2011
In 2010, 61.2% of Hoosiers were registered to vote which placed us in 43rd place in the United States. We were even worse in voter turnout. Only 39.4% of Indiana residents actually voted in the 2010 elections which placed us in 48th position. The national average was 45.4%—a full six points higher than Indiana was able to muster.
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Hebenstreit: Collaborating to Provide Services for All

September 14, 2011
Service has always been important, but in today’s frenetic world, receiving good and prompt service is critical.
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IBA Editorial: Court Funding in Critical Condition Nationwide

August 31, 2011
One of the corner stones of our American system of jurisprudence is free and open access to the trial courts and judicial system. The ability of businesses to solve their disputes in an orderly fashion and the predictability of outcomes encourages business to be conducted in our country.
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  1. I need an experienced attorney to handle a breach of contract matter. Kindly respond for more details. Graham Young

  2. I thought the slurs were the least grave aspects of her misconduct, since they had nothing to do with her being on the bench. Why then do I suspect they were the focus? I find this a troubling trend. At least she was allowed to keep her law license.

  3. Section 6 of Article I of the Indiana Constitution is pretty clear and unequivocal: "Section 6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury for the benefit of any religious or theological institution."

  4. Video pen? Nice work, "JW"! Let this be a lesson and a caution to all disgruntled ex-spouses (or soon-to-be ex-spouses) . . . you may think that altercation is going to get you some satisfaction . . . it will not.

  5. First comment on this thread is a fitting final comment on this thread, as that the MCBA never answered Duncan's fine question, and now even Eric Holder agrees that the MCBA was in material error as to the facts: "I don't get it" from Duncan December 1, 2014 5:10 PM "The Grand Jury met for 25 days and heard 70 hours of testimony according to this article and they made a decision that no crime occurred. On what basis does the MCBA conclude that their decision was "unjust"? What special knowledge or evidence does the MCBA have that the Grand Jury hearing this matter was unaware of? The system that we as lawyers are sworn to uphold made a decision that there was insufficient proof that officer committed a crime. How can any of us say we know better what was right than the jury that actually heard all of the the evidence in this case."

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