MichaelJ.Hebenstreit

Recent Articles

Hebenstreit: Thanks

January 4, 2012
Three hundred sixty five days sounds like a long time, but 2011 has flown by very quickly. This is my last column in Indiana Lawyer.
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Hebenstreit: FIGHT ON!

December 21, 2011
Less than 24 hours ago, I knew exactly what my topic for this column was going to be.
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Hebenstreit: Making a Difference in a Child's Life

December 7, 2011
IndyBar President Michael Hebenstreit writes about volunteering to be a child advocate or guardian ad litem.
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Hebenstreit: Judicial Elections Just Around the Corner

November 23, 2011
IBA President Michael Hebenstreit recognizes that the elections are over and everyone wants to get back to normal life again … but the process is beginning again.
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Hebenstreit: Too Many Clients?

November 9, 2011
Do you have too many clients? If so, you can probably skip this article; but, if not please read on.
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Hebenstreit: FLYING SOLO????!!!!!

October 26, 2011
In the current legal market, there are many lawyers, both new and more experienced, who find that they have to "go it on their own."
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Hebenstreit: With a Need so Great, What Will We Do?

October 12, 2011
We all know what pro bono legal service means and probably know or believe that it is a good idea. But have you ever thought about how it actually works?
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Hebenstreit: Lawyers and the Election Process

September 28, 2011
In 2010, 61.2% of Hoosiers were registered to vote which placed us in 43rd place in the United States. We were even worse in voter turnout. Only 39.4% of Indiana residents actually voted in the 2010 elections which placed us in 48th position. The national average was 45.4%—a full six points higher than Indiana was able to muster.
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Hebenstreit: Collaborating to Provide Services for All

September 14, 2011
Service has always been important, but in today’s frenetic world, receiving good and prompt service is critical.
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IBA Editorial: Court Funding in Critical Condition Nationwide

August 31, 2011
One of the corner stones of our American system of jurisprudence is free and open access to the trial courts and judicial system. The ability of businesses to solve their disputes in an orderly fashion and the predictability of outcomes encourages business to be conducted in our country.
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  1. Bill Satterlee is, indeed, a true jazz aficionado. Part of my legal career was spent as an associate attorney with Hoeppner, Wagner & Evans in Valparaiso. Bill was instrumental (no pun intended) in introducing me to jazz music, thereby fostering my love for this genre. We would, occasionally, travel to Chicago on weekends and sit in on some outstanding jazz sessions at Andy's on Hubbard Street. Had it not been for Bill's love of jazz music, I never would have had the good fortune of hearing it played live at Andy's. And, most likely, I might never have begun listening to it as much as I do. Thanks, Bill.

  2. The child support award is many times what the custodial parent earns, and exceeds the actual costs of providing for the children's needs. My fiance and I have agreed that if we divorce, that the children will be provided for using a shared checking account like this one(http://www.mediate.com/articles/if_they_can_do_parenting_plans.cfm) to avoid the hidden alimony in Indiana's child support guidelines.

  3. Fiat justitia ruat caelum is a Latin legal phrase, meaning "Let justice be done though the heavens fall." The maxim signifies the belief that justice must be realized regardless of consequences.

  4. Indiana up holds this behavior. the state police know they got it made.

  5. Additional Points: -Civility in the profession: Treating others with respect will not only move others to respect you, it will show a shared respect for the legal system we are all sworn to protect. When attorneys engage in unnecessary personal attacks, they lose the respect and favor of judges, jurors, the person being attacked, and others witnessing or reading the communication. It's not always easy to put anger aside, but if you don't, you will lose respect, credibility, cases, clients & jobs or job opportunities. -Read Rule 22 of the Admission & Discipline Rules. Capture that spirit and apply those principles in your daily work. -Strive to represent clients in a manner that communicates the importance you place on the legal matter you're privileged to handle for them. -There are good lawyers of all ages, but no one is perfect. Older lawyers can learn valuable skills from younger lawyers who tend to be more adept with new technologies that can improve work quality and speed. Older lawyers have already tackled more legal issues and worked through more of the problems encountered when representing clients on various types of legal matters. If there's mutual respect and a willingness to learn from each other, it will help make both attorneys better lawyers. -Erosion of the public trust in lawyers wears down public confidence in the rule of law. Always keep your duty to the profession in mind. -You can learn so much by asking questions & actively listening to instructions and advice from more experienced attorneys, regardless of how many years or decades you've each practiced law. Don't miss out on that chance.

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