DaveStafford

Dave Stafford joined the staff of the Indiana Lawyer as a reporter in May 2012. A print journalist for more than 25 years, he has won numerous awards as a reporter and editor for newspapers in Indiana, including the Anderson Herald Bulletin, where he was named Journalist of the Year in 2010. He most recently was a copy editor for the Daily Journal of Johnson County in Franklin.

Stafford and his wife, Denise, returned to their home state of Indiana in 2009, after career opportunities provided agreeable changes of scenery. Stafford worked almost 10 years at The Daytona Beach News-Journal in Florida, serving in such positions as copy editor, page designer and city editor. After a move to more temperate climates, he worked for five years as a copy editor at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Richmond, Va.

Stafford studied journalism at IUPUI. He also is an experienced freelance creative writer; film, music and book critic; and advertising copywriter.

Recent Articles

IU McKinney professor, lawyer in undecided congressional primary race

May 4, 2016
A law professor and medical doctor is in an undecided race against a 50-year lawyer for the Democratic nomination for Indiana’s Eighth Congressional District as votes continue to be tallied Wednesday from southwestern Indiana.
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Funding, use of ADR in family law cases varies in courts around state

May 4, 2016
Rensselaer lawyer Samantha Joslyn has handled family law cases filed at the Jasper County courthouse and in several surrounding counties in northwest Indiana. She said whether those cases will be mediated depends in large part on the court where the case is filed.
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Justices weigh duty of care for house party hosts

May 4, 2016
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven David posed a graphic hypothetical to an attorney defending a liability suit against a homeowner who hosted a party where a guest died after a fight. David’s scenario encapsulated the justices’ apparent concern over a trial court’s grant of summary judgment in the homeowner’s favor.
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COA reverses, remands unemployment eligibility ruling

April 29, 2016

Whether a worker voluntarily left employment must be determined by the review board of the Department of Workforce Development, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday, remanding the board’s finding that the worker was eligible for unemployment benefits.

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Burglary of deceased’s home still Class B felony, COA holds

April 28, 2016
A man who burglarized a house in Huntington after the occupant had recently died was rightly denied his petition for post-conviction relief based on his argument that the house was no longer a dwelling, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Thursday.
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Justices reinstate termination order COA reversed

April 26, 2016
The Indiana Supreme Court Tuesday affirmed a trial court order terminating parental rights to twin girls who were removed from the home in 2011 at age 8. A divided Court of Appeals previously reversed the trial court, finding insufficient evidence to merit termination.
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COA affirms denial of rescission of lifetime license ban

April 26, 2016
A man failed to persuade the Indiana Court of Appeals to restore his driving privileges after a trial court rejected his petition for rescission of a lifetime suspension.
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COA: Jury replay of 911 call within court’s discretion

April 26, 2016
A trial court was within its discretion to allow a jury to rehear a recording of a 911 call during deliberations, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday in affirming a man’s convictions of intimidation and theft.
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DNA result shielded from rape trial jury

April 20, 2016
A man convicted of rape wasn’t permitted at his trial to introduce DNA evidence collected from the victim when she sought medical attention. The DNA was from another man who also was at the party attended by several other people who testified the crime took place.
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Bloomington startup cultivates patents for novel way to garden

April 20, 2016
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on March 29 issued a design patent for the Garden Tower 2, and other patents are pending for an invention that allows up to 50 plants to grow in a compact space that would fit on the most modest apartment patio.
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  1. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  2. If the end result is to simply record the spoke word, then perhaps some day digital recording may eventually be the status quo. However, it is a shallow view to believe the professional court reporter's function is to simply report the spoken word and nothing else. There are many aspects to being a professional court reporter, and many aspects involved in producing a professional and accurate transcript. A properly trained professional steno court reporter has achieved a skill set in a field where the average dropout rate in court reporting schools across the nation is 80% due to the difficulty of mastering the necessary skills. To name just a few "extras" that a court reporter with proper training brings into a courtroom or a deposition suite; an understanding of legal procedure, technology specific to the legal profession, and an understanding of what is being said by the attorneys and litigants (which makes a huge difference in the quality of the transcript). As to contracting, or anti-contracting the argument is simple. The court reporter as governed by our ethical standards is to be the independent, unbiased individual in a deposition or courtroom setting. When one has entered into a contract with any party, insurance carrier, etc., then that reporter is no longer unbiased. I have been a court reporter for over 30 years and I echo Mr. Richardson's remarks that I too am here to serve.

  3. A competitive bid process is ethical and appropriate especially when dealing with government agencies and large corporations, but an ethical line is crossed when court reporters in Pittsburgh start charging exorbitant fees on opposing counsel. This fee shifting isn't just financially biased, it undermines the entire justice system, giving advantages to those that can afford litigation the most. It makes no sense.

  4. "a ttention to detail is an asset for all lawyers." Well played, Indiana Lawyer. Well played.

  5. I have a appeals hearing for the renewal of my LPN licenses and I need an attorney, the ones I have spoke to so far want the money up front and I cant afford that. I was wondering if you could help me find one that takes payments or even a pro bono one. I live in Indiana just north of Indianapolis.

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