DaveStafford

Dave Stafford joined the staff of the Indiana Lawyer as a reporter in May 2012. A print journalist for more than 25 years, he has won numerous awards as a reporter and editor for newspapers in Indiana, including the Anderson Herald Bulletin, where he was named Journalist of the Year in 2010. He most recently was a copy editor for the Daily Journal of Johnson County in Franklin.

Stafford and his wife, Denise, returned to their home state of Indiana in 2009, after career opportunities provided agreeable changes of scenery. Stafford worked almost 10 years at The Daytona Beach News-Journal in Florida, serving in such positions as copy editor, page designer and city editor. After a move to more temperate climates, he worked for five years as a copy editor at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Richmond, Va.

Stafford studied journalism at IUPUI. He also is an experienced freelance creative writer; film, music and book critic; and advertising copywriter.

Recent Articles

AG’s office: Same-sex marriage fight cost state about $7,000

October 24, 2014
Responding to requests from Indiana Democrats, the Office of Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller on Friday afternoon released records arguing the state’s defense of statutes banning same-sex marriage cost the state about $7,000.
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Democrats push to be on Marion County judge ballot

October 23, 2014
Marion County Superior judge elections ruled unconstitutional this month should not proceed Nov. 4 as the current ballot is drawn, according to court pleadings from candidates who were left out of the general election.
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Zoeller details casino millions funneled to E. Chicago pols

October 22, 2014
A former Indiana Democratic Party chairman and a longtime Lake County political activist enriched themselves with millions of dollars in casino revenue, Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller announced Wednesday, closing the book on long-running litigation that resulted in a $154,042 settlement payment to the city of East Chicago.
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Lawyer’s book retraces Indy’s infamous Sylvia Likens murder case

October 22, 2014
Almost 50 years later, Forrest Bowman Jr. is talking about the murder case involving Indianapolis teen Sylvia Likens, something he’s not done much of in the past. His just-released book, “Sylvia: The Likens Trial,” presents a thorough, inside, day-by-day recollection of a trial that captivated and horrified the state in 1966.
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Lawmakers in no rush to fix Marion County’s judicial selection process

October 22, 2014
Marion County’s unique power-sharing judicial-election system won’t be fixed anytime soon, even though a federal judge has ruled the four-decade-old system is unconstitutional.
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Pharmacist’s snooping is a prescription for trouble

October 22, 2014
Walgreen’s appeal of $1.8M judgment in favor of customer raises patient privacy issues.
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Public-private partnerships’ popularity peaking

October 22, 2014
In an era of tight lending for construction, public-private partnerships are a solution to get desired projects funded and under way. Attorneys who represent parties in such deals say nuanced negotiations hold the key for deals with a shared vision but sometimes competing interests.
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Judge must face federal lawsuit over drug court detentions

October 21, 2014
Clark Circuit Judge Jerome Jacobi must face a federal lawsuit from drug court participants who allege they were improperly detained or unlawfully arrested as participants in the problem-solving court he oversaw.
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Split COA reverses denial of post-conviction relief

October 21, 2014
A defense attorney’s failure to raise the consecutive sentencing limitation prejudiced his client, the majority of a Court of Appeals panel ruled, reversing denial of post-conviction relief for a man convicted of multiple burglaries. The court remanded for resentencing to trim six years off a 28-year prison term.
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Indiana justices to hear school bus fees appeal

October 20, 2014
The Indiana Supreme Court will decide whether a public school district may charge parents a fee to transport children to and from school.
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  1. Such things are no more elections than those in the late, unlamented Soviet Union.

  2. It appears the police and prosecutors are allowed to change the rules halfway through the game to suit themselves. I am surprised that the congress has not yet eliminated the right to a trial in cases involving any type of forensic evidence. That would suit their foolish law and order police state views. I say we eliminate the statute of limitations for crimes committed by members of congress and other government employees. Of course they would never do that. They are all corrupt cowards!!!

  3. Poor Judge Brown probably thought that by slavishly serving the godz of the age her violations of 18th century concepts like due process and the rule of law would be overlooked. Mayhaps she was merely a Judge ahead of her time?

  4. in a lawyer discipline case Judge Brown, now removed, was presiding over a hearing about a lawyer accused of the supposedly heinous ethical violation of saying the words "Illegal immigrant." (IN re Barker) http://www.in.gov/judiciary/files/order-discipline-2013-55S00-1008-DI-429.pdf .... I wonder if when we compare the egregious violations of due process by Judge Brown, to her chiding of another lawyer for politically incorrectness, if there are any conclusions to be drawn about what kind of person, what kind of judge, what kind of apparatchik, is busy implementing the agenda of political correctness and making off-limits legit advocacy about an adverse party in a suit whose illegal alien status is relevant? I am just asking the question, the reader can make own conclsuion. Oh wait-- did I use the wrong adjective-- let me rephrase that, um undocumented alien?

  5. of course the bigger questions of whether or not the people want to pay for ANY bussing is off limits, due to the Supreme Court protecting the people from DEMOCRACY. Several decades hence from desegregation and bussing plans and we STILL need to be taking all this taxpayer money to combat mostly-imagined "discrimination" in the most obviously failed social program of the postwar period.

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