DaveStafford

Dave Stafford joined the staff of the Indiana Lawyer as a reporter in May 2012. A print journalist for more than 25 years, he has won numerous awards as a reporter and editor for newspapers in Indiana, including the Anderson Herald Bulletin, where he was named Journalist of the Year in 2010. He most recently was a copy editor for the Daily Journal of Johnson County in Franklin.

Stafford and his wife, Denise, returned to their home state of Indiana in 2009, after career opportunities provided agreeable changes of scenery. Stafford worked almost 10 years at The Daytona Beach News-Journal in Florida, serving in such positions as copy editor, page designer and city editor. After a move to more temperate climates, he worked for five years as a copy editor at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Richmond, Va.

Stafford studied journalism at IUPUI. He also is an experienced freelance creative writer; film, music and book critic; and advertising copywriter.

Recent Articles

COA admonishes prosecutor’s misconduct, doesn’t reverse conviction

July 22, 2016
A prosecutor’s suggestion to the jury during an attempted rape trial that a defense attorney influenced a witness was misconduct, but not sufficient to warrant reversal of the defendant’s conviction, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday. But the court also called out the prosecutor and warned him.
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Reversal: HHGregg prevails in appeal over managers’ bonuses

July 22, 2016
HHGregg senior managers are not entitled to share in $40 million in life insurance proceeds from the 2012 death of executive chairman of the board Jerry Throgmartin, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday, reversing a trial court ruling in the managers’ favor.
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Wal-Mart shoplifter’s resisting conviction affirmed

July 22, 2016
A man who fled from police and later was arrested after he and another man had been spotted allegedly shoplifting from a Lafayette Wal-Mart store was properly convicted of Class A misdemeanor resisting law enforcement, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday.
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Gary bar loses by default, owes fight promoter $6,000

July 19, 2016
A Gary bar that allowed patrons to watch an Ultimate Fighting Championship broadcast must pay more than $6,000 in damages for failing to pay for a license to air the broadcast, a federal judge ruled.
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What’s in a name? Litigation, if it’s Square Donuts

July 18, 2016
A federal judge last week kept alive a lawsuit filed by a northern Indiana maker and seller of Square Donuts against Square Donuts Inc., the Terre Haute-based company that sells its trademarked treats mostly across the four corners of southern Indiana.
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Senior judge faces discipline case for OWI, alleged cover-up bid

July 15, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals Senior Judge William Garrard will face judicial discipline proceedings after driving drunk in Mooresville last November, colliding with a car and later asking a policeman at the hospital to forget about it.
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Conour asks 7th Circuit for non-public defender to reopen appeal

July 15, 2016
Former Indiana lawyer William Conour filed a pro se jailhouse pleading Thursday asking the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals to appoint a non-public defender at taxpayer expense to reopen the limited appeal of his wire fraud conviction.
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Quoting Dickens’ ‘Bleak House,’ judge decides 24-year-old lawsuit

July 14, 2016
A Lake County judge on Wednesday ordered summary judgment for defendants in a 24-year-old lawsuit he likened to the interminable Jarndyce and Jarndyce case in Charles Dickens’ novel “Bleak House.”
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Asylum seeker from Indiana wins reprieve

July 13, 2016
A Chinese national living in Indiana persuaded the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals he was wrongly denied asylum for his claim that he was severely beaten and left hospitalized for months after he vocally opposed state agents enforcing the country’s one-child policy.
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‘Unprecedented’ law blocked, Planned Parenthood takes aim again

July 13, 2016
After a federal judge on June 30 blocked a restrictive new Indiana abortion law from taking effect, Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky and the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana vowed to take aim at other recent enactments that might infringe on the constitutional right. A week later, a fresh federal lawsuit targeted another Indiana abortion law passed this year.
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  1. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  2. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  3. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  4. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  5. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

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