DaveStafford

Dave Stafford joined the staff of the Indiana Lawyer as a reporter in May 2012. A print journalist for more than 25 years, he has won numerous awards as a reporter and editor for newspapers in Indiana, including the Anderson Herald Bulletin, where he was named Journalist of the Year in 2010. He most recently was a copy editor for the Daily Journal of Johnson County in Franklin.

Stafford and his wife, Denise, returned to their home state of Indiana in 2009, after career opportunities provided agreeable changes of scenery. Stafford worked almost 10 years at The Daytona Beach News-Journal in Florida, serving in such positions as copy editor, page designer and city editor. After a move to more temperate climates, he worked for five years as a copy editor at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Richmond, Va.

Stafford studied journalism at IUPUI. He also is an experienced freelance creative writer; film, music and book critic; and advertising copywriter.

Recent Articles

Judge: Lawyer must pay $22k in Indy skyline photo suit

August 30, 2016
A McCordsville lawyer and photographer who wrongly sued a man he claimed violated his copyright by posting a photo of the Indianapolis skyline on a website must pay more than $22,000 in legal fees, a federal judge has ruled.
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Disabled passenger’s PI suit against Austrian Airlines stays in Indiana

August 25, 2016
A Crown Point woman who claims employees of Austrian Airlines broke her leg after failing to accommodate her disability may proceed with her federal lawsuit in Hammond, a judge has ruled.
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Willis takes first administrative lead role in state’s judiciary

August 24, 2016
Mary Willis is known in the Indiana judiciary for going beyond the day-to-day duties of a trial court judge — a mover and shaker who seemed a natural choice for the newly created position of chief administrative officer for the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Departing the partner track

August 24, 2016
Law firms are looking for talent and signing up attorneys who fit clients’ needs in flexible arrangements that eschew the traditional associate-to-partner model. The trend addresses the firms’ needs to contain costs and the desire of many lawyers for more work-life balance.
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Prosecutor faces ethics sanction for book deal in Camm case

August 24, 2016
Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson should be reprimanded by the Indiana Supreme Court for a book deal on a high-profile murder case against former Indiana State Trooper David Camm, recommends a hearing officer in Henderson’s discipline case. The hearing officer blasted the conduct of lawyers on both sides of the ethics matter.
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Workplace harassment endures, evolves

August 24, 2016
Despite decades of on-the-job training for workers and numerous high-profile lawsuits, harassment by managers and co-workers persists. Though the number of sexual harassment claims has declined in recent years, companies still get hit with thousands of lawsuits alleging harassment of some kind each year.
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DOC, trial court errors lead to reversal of parole revocation

August 23, 2016
A longtime criminal who was convicted of violating his parole on an attempted robbery sentence was deprived a hearing on a corrected record and therefore is entitled to post-conviction relief, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday.
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COA advice: Leave affirmation out of jury instructions

August 23, 2016
A man’s convictions of battery and disorderly conduct will stand, but the Indiana Court of Appeals cautioned trial courts that including law enforcement affirmations in jury instructions should not, calling the practice “undesirable and completely avoidable.”
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City owes man legal fees for ‘meritless, possibly frivolous’ case

August 22, 2016
The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department and the city’s Office of Corporation Counsel pursued a ‘wholly meritless, possibly frivolous argument’ in a public-records case, the Court of Appeals ruled Monday. The city will pay the legal fees of a man who sued to obtain records after he was denied.
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Appeals panel overturns man’s trespass conviction

August 22, 2016
An Indianapolis man who had lived with his father with the consent of the senior apartment complex where he resided should not have been convicted of trespass after he was ordered to leave, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled in overturning a bench trial verdict.
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  1. Indianapolis employers harassment among minorities AFRICAN Americans needs to be discussed the metro Indianapolis area is horrible when it comes to harassing African American employees especially in the local healthcare facilities. Racially profiling in the workplace is an major issue. Please make it better because I'm many civil rights leaders would come here and justify that Indiana is a state the WORKS only applies to Caucasian Americans especially in Hamilton county. Indiana targets African Americans in the workplace so when governor pence is trying to convince people to vote for him this would be awesome publicity for the Presidency Elections.

  2. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  3. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  4. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  5. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

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