MarilynOdendahl

Marilyn Odendahl covers the Indiana General Assembly as well as law schools and bar associations across the state for the Indiana Lawyer. Prior to joining the Indiana Lawyer, she was a reporter for nearly eight years at The Elkhart Truth, in Elkhart, Ind., where she primarily covered business. She holds degrees from Ball State University and the University of Louisville.

Recent Articles

Goshen attorney John Ulmer recognized for 50-plus year career

August 24, 2016
When the conflict arose between classes and basketball, John Ulmer, like just about any Hoosier would, picked roundball and, inadvertently, took his first steps toward a legal career that has since lasted more than 50 years.
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ABA takes stronger stance on harassment, discrimination

August 24, 2016
While the new model rule addresses bias and prejudice, Indiana’s conduct rule is much stricter.
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7th Circuit opinion highlights confusion over LGBT discrimination protection

August 24, 2016
Within the first nine pages of its opinion, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a district court’s ruling that sexual orientation is not protected by Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. And there, the panel could have ended its discussion. But the court spotlighted the growing confusion in the courts of when, exactly, sexual orientation crosses the line into gender nonconformity.
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Promise to pay for broken nose breathes life into estoppel claim

August 23, 2016
A young woman who suffered a broken nose trying to help law enforcement can have her estoppel claim move forward even though she did not file a timely notice under the Indiana Tort Claims Act.
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Prisoner’s 2241 petition again fails in 7th Circuit

August 23, 2016
A federal prisoner trying to challenge his sentence has again tripped over procedure and lost his second appeal before the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.
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State fighting birth certificate ruling

August 15, 2016
Married same-sex female couples who challenged Indiana’s refusal to recognize the non-birth mothers on their children’s birth certificates reiterate that they want to be treated in the same manner as heterosexual couples – no more, no less. The state, which intends to appeal a ruling finding Indiana's paternity statutes to be unconstitutional, is first asking the judge to take another look at her ruling.
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ABA calls for including implicit bias in jury instructions

August 12, 2016
Over opposition from some attorneys including one from Indiana, the American Bar Association has adopted a resolution that calls for judges to instruct jurors on implicit bias.
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Former Ivy Tech prof may ask 7th Circuit to rehear sexual orientation discrimination suit

August 10, 2016
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals has granted a former Ivy Tech Community College adjunct professor, who claims she was passed over for promotions based on her sexual orientation, an extension of time to file a petition for rehearing and rehearing en banc.
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Fitness trackers add to flood of digital evidence in courts

August 10, 2016
The law surrounding the information is still evolving, particularly in the area of privacy and Fourth Amendment rights. Civil, but more likely criminal, attorneys will be handling digital evidence more and more especially as law enforcement increasingly relies on technology to track suspects and link them to crimes.
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Legal battles spark EPA to set emission standards for composite wood products

August 10, 2016
Nearly 11 years after the survivors of Hurricane Katrina began blaming their FEMA trailers for their health problems, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued a new rule addressing what is believed to have been the main cause of their suffering — formaldehyde.
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  1. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  2. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  3. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

  4. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  5. This article proved very enlightening. Right ahead of sitting the LSAT for the first time, I felt a sense of relief that a score of 141 was admitted to an Indiana Law School and did well under unique circumstances. While my GPA is currently 3.91 I fear standardized testing and hope that I too will get a good enough grade for acceptance here at home. Thanks so much for this informative post.

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