MarilynOdendahl

Marilyn Odendahl covers the Indiana General Assembly as well as law schools and bar associations across the state for the Indiana Lawyer. Prior to joining the Indiana Lawyer, she was a reporter for nearly eight years at The Elkhart Truth, in Elkhart, Ind., where she primarily covered business. She holds degrees from Ball State University and the University of Louisville.

Recent Articles

Legislature appoints special alcohol commission

May 25, 2017
Cold beer could be available in Indiana convenience stores’ coolers within two years.
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Bloomington files lawsuit over last-minute annexation amendment

May 25, 2017
The city of Bloomington has filed a lawsuit against Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb, claiming an amendment dropped into the state’s biennial budget at 2 a.m. April 21 and approved less than 24 hours later is specifically targeting the municipality to prevent it from annexing seven unincorporated areas near the city limits.
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Trump budget hits legal aid and public service sectors

May 24, 2017
The American Bar Association is speaking out against key provisions in the Trump administration’s budget blueprint that would hit legal aid particularly hard.
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7th Circuit hears Indiana birth certificate dispute

May 23, 2017
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals seemed unconvinced that Indiana’s prohibition against listing non-birth mothers in female, same-sex married couples on a child’s birth certificate violates the Constitution.
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Ex-Evansville police officer convicted of murder appeals to US Supreme Court

May 19, 2017
A former Evansville police officer serving an 80-year sentence for murder and arson has asked the Supreme Court of the United States to overturn his conviction and order a new trial.
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IDEM whistleblower makes argument to Indiana Supreme Court

May 18, 2017
A former employee of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management appeared in the Indiana Supreme Court courtroom Thursday arguing her right to bring a complaint against the state under the whistleblower provision of the Indiana False Claims Act.
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57 percent of 2016 Indiana law graduates have full-time JD-required jobs

May 17, 2017
A little more than half of the 2016 graduates of Indiana law schools have full-time, long-term jobs where bar passage is required, according to American Bar Association employment statistics.
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Character better predictor of lawyering success, panel says

May 17, 2017
Although Rebecca Love Kourlis sees more collaboration than in the past, she said the gap between the skills the legal profession needs in today’s market and the attorneys law schools are producing is not only widening but will be difficult for legal education to overcome.
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Kagan: Supreme Court did ‘pretty darn well’ with just 8 justices

May 17, 2017
During the 419 days the Supreme Court operated with an even number on the bench, the eight justices worked to find common ground so the court could issue majority opinions. Justice Elena Kagan said she and her colleagues learned to keep talking, listening and persuading as well as being open to persuasion.
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Holcomb’s executive order expected to 'ban the box' in state job applications

May 17, 2017
A bill prohibiting communities from enacting their own ban the box ordinances stirred divisions in the Indiana Legislature with supporters arguing for employers’ rights and opponents citing the need for individuals to have equal opportunities for jobs. However, when Gov. Eric Holcomb announced his intention to sign Senate Enrolled Act 312, he brought some rare unity between the two sides. Along with enacting the new law, the governor also said he would sign an executive order that will essentially ban the box for state agencies.
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  1. File under the Sociology of Hoosier Discipline ... “We will be answering the complaint in due course and defending against the commission’s allegations,” said Indianapolis attorney Don Lundberg, who’s representing Hudson in her disciplinary case. FOR THOSE WHO DO NOT KNOW ... Lundberg ran the statist attorney disciplinary machinery in Indy for decades, and is now the "go to guy" for those who can afford him .... the ultimate insider for the well-to-do and/or connected who find themselves in the crosshairs. It would appear that this former prosecutor knows how the game is played in Circle City ... and is sacrificing accordingly. See more on that here ... http://www.theindianalawyer.com/supreme-court-reprimands-attorney-for-falsifying-hours-worked/PARAMS/article/43757 Legal sociologists could have a field day here ... I wonder why such things are never studied? Is a sacrifice to the well connected former regulators a de facto bribe? Such questions, if probed, could bring about a more just world, a more equal playing field, less Stalinist governance. All of the things that our preambles tell us to value could be advanced if only sunshine reached into such dark worlds. As a great jurist once wrote: "Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman." Other People's Money—and How Bankers Use It (1914). Ah, but I am certifiable, according to the Indiana authorities, according to the ISC it can be read, for believing such trite things and for advancing such unwanted thoughts. As a great albeit fictional and broken resistance leaders once wrote: "I am the dead." Winston Smith Let us all be dead to the idea of maintaining a patently unjust legal order.

  2. The Department of Education still has over $100 million of ITT Education Services money in the form of $100+ million Letters of Credit. That money was supposed to be used by The DOE to help students. The DOE did nothing to help students. The DOE essentially stole the money from ITT Tech and still has the money. The trustee should be going after the DOE to get the money back for people who are owed that money, including shareholders.

  3. Do you know who the sponsor of the last-minute amendment was?

  4. Law firms of over 50 don't deliver good value, thats what this survey really tells you. Anybody that has seen what they bill for compared to what they deliver knows that already, however.

  5. As one of the many consumers affected by this breach, I found my bank data had been lifted and used to buy over $200 of various merchandise in New York. I did a pretty good job of tracing the purchases to stores around a college campus just from the info on my bank statement. Hm. Mr. Hill, I would like my $200 back! It doesn't belong to the state, in my opinion. Give it back to the consumers affected. I had to freeze my credit and take out data protection, order a new debit card and wait until it arrived. I deserve something for my trouble!

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