AustenParrish

Recent Articles

Dean's Desk: New faculty continue legacy of legal scholarship

May 4, 2016
Inspired and challenged by the school's awesome legacy, IU Maurer has been fortunate to recruit some of the most promising rising stars in legal education today, all of whom are classroom standouts as well.

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Dean's Desk: New Wintersession offers learning, networking opportunities

November 18, 2015
This January – while other law schools’ students remain on winter break – our students will be diligently at work, honing their legal skills and knowledge in a fast-paced, weeklong program taught by leading lawyers and business executives from around the country.
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Dean's Desk: Stewart Fellows bring global experience to Indiana

May 6, 2015
Globalization, once the exclusive domain of so-called international lawyers, now touches many lawyers’ practices. For this reason, the IU Maurer School of Law has been on the forefront of offering global opportunities to our students.
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Dean's Desk: Partnerships prep students for Indiana legal careers

November 5, 2014
A growing economy needs all kinds of professional support – including leaders who have been trained in law and know how to problem-solve. That’s why we have developed several new programs at the IU Maurer School of Law designed to attract the best and brightest students to our school, introduce them to the growing global economy – and, we hope, keep them in the Hoosier State.
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Dean's Desk: IU Maurer alumni, students exemplify hard work, integrity

April 23, 2014
IU Maurer Dean Austen Parrish writes in his first Dean's Desk column about recent inductees into the school's Academy of Law Alumni Fellows and how their successes can inspire current students.
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  1. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  2. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  3. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  4. I totally agree with John Smith.

  5. An idea that would harm the public good which is protected by licensing. Might as well abolish doctor and health care professions licensing too. Ridiculous. Unrealistic. Would open the floodgates of mischief and abuse. Even veteranarians are licensed. How has deregulation served the public good in banking, for example? Enough ideology already!

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