CorySchouten

Reporter
Real estate, retail

Property Lines
real estate blog moderator

Schouten joined IBJ as a reporter in 2006 after stints at the Sarasota Herald-Tribune and the Arizona Republic. He covered education in Arizona and politics and hurricanes in Florida. A graduate of Southport High School and Indiana University, Schouten hosts a real estate blog on IBJ.com that twice has been named the nation’s best among business journals by the Alliance of Area Business Publications. Schouten also has been honored for his body of work at IBJ. Outside the office, he serves on the community relations board for Noble of Indiana and mentors youth through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana.

Phone:
(317) 472-5370

Follow Cory on Twitter: www.twitter.com/propertylines

 

Recent Articles

Jury returns guilty verdicts in Indy Land Bank case

March 19, 2015
A federal jury on Wednesday evening returned guilty verdicts on eight felony counts including wire fraud and bribery against Reggie Walton, a former Indianapolis city employee who managed the Indy Land Bank.
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Former Indy Land Bank chief grilled over inconsistent testimony

March 17, 2015
Former Indy Land Bank director Reggie Walton opted to take the stand in his own defense in federal court this week, and prosecutors used the opportunity to use his words against him.
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Indy Land Bank trial could turn on government wiretaps

March 4, 2015
Reginald T. Walton is guilty of "very poor judgment" and "ethics violations," and also "did a pretty good job concealing" his involvement in private real estate partnerships during his tenure leading the Indy Land Bank, but he's not guilty of any crime, his attorney argued in federal court Wednesday.
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OneAmerica pays $800K over fraud orchestrated by ex-employee

November 12, 2014
OneAmerica Securities Inc. has agreed to pay the state $805,000 to settle allegations it failed to supervise a former employee who helped orchestrate an $8.9 million Ponzi scheme in Ohio, Kentucky and southeastern Indiana.
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Church accuses JPMorgan of mismanagement, self-dealing

August 14, 2014
Christ Church Cathedral in Indianapolis has filed a federal lawsuit against JPMorgan Chase, alleging the bank's "intentional mismanagement" and "self-dealing" led to $13 million in losses in church trust accounts endowed in the 1970s by Eli Lilly Jr.
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How the Brizzi public-corruption case unraveled

November 5, 2013
Federal authorities suffered a near-complete defeat in their efforts to prosecute the players in an unusual real estate deal in Elkhart, a setback that ultimately doomed an ambitious public-corruption case targeting former Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi.
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Judge sentences attorney Page to probation, fine

November 4, 2013
Attorney and real estate developer Paul J. Page will serve two years of probation and pay a $10,000 fine for concealing the source of a $362,000 down payment on his purchase of a state-leased office building in Elkhart.
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Feds charge 5 in Indy Land Bank kickback scheme

May 21, 2013
Federal prosecutors have charged two Indianapolis city employees in the Department of Metropolitan Development and three others in a scheme involving cash kickbacks on the sale of properties in the Indy Land Bank.
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Former Marion County deputy prosecutor agrees to plead guilty to bribery

May 13, 2013
The top deputy under former Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi has agreed to plead guilty to a federal charge for his role in the early release of a woman convicted in a murder-for-hire scheme.
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Fraud victim files civil suit against ex-councilor

February 11, 2013
An Indianapolis physician who lost $1.7 million in a fraud scheme orchestrated in part by former Democratic City-County Councilor Paul C. Bateman Jr. has sued Bateman and two associates in Marion Circuit Court.
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  1. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  2. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  3. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  4. I totally agree with John Smith.

  5. An idea that would harm the public good which is protected by licensing. Might as well abolish doctor and health care professions licensing too. Ridiculous. Unrealistic. Would open the floodgates of mischief and abuse. Even veteranarians are licensed. How has deregulation served the public good in banking, for example? Enough ideology already!

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