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Bar Crawl - 4/27/11

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Bar Crawl

Bar Crawl is Indiana Lawyer’s section highlighting bar association news around the state. The IL strives to include bar association news and trends in its regular stories, and we would like to include more news from specialty and county bars. If you’d like to submit an update about your bar association or a photo from an event your bar association has hosted, or if you have questions about having your bar association news included in the newspaper, please send it to Jenny Montgomery at jmontgomery@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow-up questions at least two weeks in advance of the issue date.

Lake County Bar hosts Law Day

On April 29, eighth-grade classrooms throughout Lake County will host volunteer lawyers, judges, and law professors for presentations on Law Day 2011: “The Legacy of John Adams, A Government of Laws, not Men.” The Young Lawyers Section of the Lake County Bar Association will bring this presentation and discussion directly to the classrooms of eighth-grade students in Lake County, and will provide those students with an opportunity to share their own understanding of John Adams’ legacy through the Law Day 2011 essay contest.

The goal of the presentation is to help eighth-grade students become more aware of the pivotal role that John Adams played in the founding of the United States, and later as our nation’s second president. John Adams, the first “lawyer-president” of the United States, was an important influence in the development of the rule of law in this country. Through his defense of those accused in the Boston Massacre, Adams instilled the principle that all accused of a crime are entitled to a competent defense.

The essay contest is open to all Lake County eighth-graders. Entrants will select from a list of provided essay topics addressing the Law Day theme and write an essay of 250 words or less. Two winners will be chosen, one boy and one girl. The winners will each receive an award of $250.

For more information, contact Benjamin Fryman at bdf@sftlawyers.com.

Indy Bar annual appellate meeting

The Indianapolis Bar Association will host the Appellate Practice Section annual meeting on May 17, preceded by a cocktail reception from 5 to 7 p.m. at the IBA building, 135 N. Pennsylvania St., Suite 1500, Indianapolis. The event is free for Appellate Practice Section members. Other bar association members may attend for a fee of $25. Registration information is available on the IBA website: http://www.indybar.org/.

State Bar offers solo conference

On May 10, the Indiana State Bar Association will host “Suddenly Solo: How to Launch a Successful Practice.”

Reid Trautz, a nationally recognized speaker, will cover practical topics on building a client base, what every solo must know to avoid failure, managing the practice ethically, and setting and collecting fees. Local bar members will also talk about the nuts and bolts of solo practice, and the one-day conference will include a panel discussion on ethical considerations.

The event is from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the ICLEF Conference Facility, 230 E. Ohio St., Indianapolis. Registration information and conference agenda is available on the ISBA website: http://www.inbar.org/.•

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  1. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

  2. Seventh Circuit Court Judge Diane Wood has stated in “The Rule of Law in Times of Stress” (2003), “that neither laws nor the procedures used to create or implement them should be secret; and . . . the laws must not be arbitrary.” According to the American Bar Association, Wood’s quote drives home this point: The rule of law also requires that people can expect predictable results from the legal system; this is what Judge Wood implies when she says that “the laws must not be arbitrary.” Predictable results mean that people who act in the same way can expect the law to treat them in the same way. If similar actions do not produce similar legal outcomes, people cannot use the law to guide their actions, and a “rule of law” does not exist.

  3. Linda, I sure hope you are not seeking a law license, for such eighteenth century sentiments could result in your denial in some jurisdictions minting attorneys for our tolerant and inclusive profession.

  4. Mazel Tov to the newlyweds. And to those bakers, photographers, printers, clerks, judges and others who will lose careers and social standing for not saluting the New World (Dis)Order, we can all direct our Two Minutes of Hate as Big Brother asks of us. Progress! Onward!

  5. My daughter was taken from my home at the end of June/2014. I said I would sign the safety plan but my husband would not. My husband said he would leave the house so my daughter could stay with me but the case worker said no her mind is made up she is taking my daughter. My daughter went to a friends and then the friend filed a restraining order which she was told by dcs if she did not then they would take my daughter away from her. The restraining order was not in effect until we were to go to court. Eventually it was dropped but for 2 months DCS refused to allow me to have any contact and was using the restraining order as the reason but it was not in effect. This was Dcs violating my rights. Please help me I don't have the money for an attorney. Can anyone take this case Pro Bono?

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