ILNews

Bar Crawl - 7/31/13

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
Bar Crawl

Bar Crawl highlights bar association news around the state. Indiana Lawyer strives to include bar association news and trends in its regular stories, and we would like to include more news from specialty and county bars. If you’d like to submit an update about your bar association or a photo from an event your bar association has hosted, or if you have questions about having your bar association news included in the newspaper, please send it to Marilyn Odendahl at modendahl@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow-up questions at least two weeks prior to the issue date.

Indianapolis Bar making callfor Green Initiative members

The Indianapolis Bar Association is taking applications for its environmental program, Green Legal Initiative.

Now in its second year, the initiative encourages the legal community to commit to practicing law in ways that are environmentally safe and sustainable.

To participate, legal entities must complete a Green Legal Initiative application. Also, they can evaluate their green status by submitting a Green Business Practice Certification and complying with green business practices in such categories as water and energy conservation, paper reduction and recycling.

Green Legal Initiative members will be recognized by the IndyBar at the annual recognition luncheon and on the bar association’s website.

Applications are due by Sept. 13. For more information, visit www.indybar.org.

Indiana Bar Foundation names Legendary Lawyer for 2013

Retired Indianapolis attorney Henry C. Ryder has been selected to receive the Indianapolis Bar Foundation’s 2013 Legendary Lawyer Award.

The Legendary Lawyer Award recognizes an IBF fellow whose service to the community and legal career have demonstrated the highest standards of the legal profession.

Ryder practiced law for 54 years, retiring eight years ago. He focused much of his work on representing management in labor relations and employment matters.

After graduating from the University of Michigan Law School in 1951, Ryder served two years during the Korean War. Upon returning home, he joined the Indianapolis firm of Buschmann Krieg DeVault and Alexander in 1953.

Seven years later, Ryder and William E. Roberts founded the firm Roberts & Ryder. He finished his career as a partner and of counsel at Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

Ryder will receive the award at a reception from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Sept. 6 at Barnes & Thornburg. To reserve a seat, contact the IBF at 317-269-2415.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Conour will never turn these funds over to his defrauded clients. He tearfully told the court, and his daughters dutifully pledged in interviews, that his first priority is to repay every dime of the money he stole from his clients. Judge Young bought it, much to the chagrin of Conour’s victims. Why would Conour need the $2,262 anyway? Taxpayers are now supporting him, paying for his housing, utilities, food, healthcare, and clothing. If Conour puts the money anywhere but in the restitution fund, he’s proved, once again, what a con artist he continues to be and that he has never had any intention of repaying his clients. Judge Young will be proven wrong... again; Conour has no remorse and the Judge is one of the many conned.

  2. Pass Legislation to require guilty defendants to pay for the costs of lab work, etc as part of court costs...

  3. The fee increase would be livable except for the 11% increase in spending at the Disciplinary Commission. The Commission should be focused on true public harm rather than going on witch hunts against lawyers who dare to criticize judges.

  4. Marijuana is safer than alcohol. AT the time the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act was enacted all major pharmaceutical companies in the US sold marijuana products. 11 Presidents of the US have smoked marijuana. Smoking it does not increase the likelihood that you will get lung cancer. There are numerous reports of canabis oil killing many kinds of incurable cancer. (See Rick Simpson's Oil on the internet or facebook).

  5. The US has 5% of the world's population and 25% of the world's prisoners. Far too many people are sentenced for far too many years in prison. Many of the federal prisoners are sentenced for marijuana violations. Marijuana is safer than alcohol.

ADVERTISEMENT