ILNews

Big-firm attorneys find comfort zone in practice outside the office

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Polly Dobbs’ view from work most days isn’t the one her Bingham Greenebaum Doll colleagues share from the top floors of Market Tower in Indianapolis. She doesn’t look out over the Statehouse rotunda, White River State Park or Lucas Oil Stadium.

“Right now I’m looking at my garden and some cows,” Dobbs said from the 6,200-square-foot, historic colonial farmhouse she and her family had restored.

pollydobbs004-15col.jpg Polly Dobbs works with Bingham Greenebaum Doll’s estate planning practice group from her home in Peru. (Photo by Bethany Brindle)

Her big-law practice sits on 2,500 acres between the city of Peru and Mississinewa Lake, about 75 miles north of Indianapolis, in her grandparents’ old house. It’s the house where she grew up; the house is where legendary Hoosier composer Cole Porter wandered home from Yale University about 100 years ago.

Dobbs, who works in Bingham’s estate planning practice group, is among a select group of attorneys at large Indiana firms who work from home. Dobbs, her husband, and their two children moved into the home last July in the culmination of her efforts to work with her firm to assure a work-life balance.

“I still have my very high-level practice, and I’m doing it from the farm,” Dobbs said.

Technology gives attorneys the ability to work almost anywhere. But working from home carries tradeoffs for the attorney and the firm.

“It’s solely dependent on the connections working, and you do have issues,” said Jim Reed, a partner at Bingham who was Dobbs’ practice group chair. “Our IT people are really good … there are times that it’s critical that you have to work in real time and collaborate; you have no choice but to do that.”

The technical connections must work, and so must the human connections. Before Dobbs made the transition to working at home, she and her colleagues prepared for the move for nine months and practiced scenarios.

The firm provided everything Dobbs needed to work from home, even sending an IT person to hook equipment up and make sure the connections were secure.

“We had to figure out a way to make this work. We did not want to lose her under any circumstances,” Reed said.

And for Dobbs, the move put her not only at home, but where she needs to be.

weinzapfel Weinzapfel

“My niche is estate planning for high-net-worth farmers,” she said. “For my farming clients, I’m the girl in their hometown.”

Perceptions persist

Since the rise of telecommuting in the 1990s, attorneys have had the tools to work at home or while traveling, but a relative few committed to working from home full time.

Pattie Zelmer is a partner with Ice

Miller in Indianapolis who started working from her home in South Bend in 1998 and still does. “I’m probably the first one within our firm to do so, and I did it as a partner,” she said. Like Dobbs, she chose to work from home to have more time with her two young children.


 

“I think technology really came about at a time that I needed it,” she said with a laugh. “I thought at the time I was the luckiest person in the world, and I still feel that way.”

Zelmer, whose practice is concentrated in municipal finance, remembers some colleagues had dubious perceptions: “Does that mean you’re somehow not working as hard?”

Reed volunteers that at 55, he is of a generation that has had to warm to the idea of lawyers working from home. He recalled a recent time when “you never failed to be in the office when the boss was there. You had to be there, you had to be seen; it’s something the older lawyers are trying to understand and deal with.”

Younger attorneys who are likelier to be in mobile contact “don’t have that same sense of obligation to be present,” he said.

Reed said Bingham had experience with other work-from-home situations in the past, including attorneys who’ve worked in northern Michigan and Gainesville, Fla.

“The key part is just having a system and making sure everyone understands you’re not in the office every day, but what lawyer this day and age would be in the office every day?” Reed said.

workfromhomeSome firms remain reluctant about work-at-home situations.

Jeffrey A. Abrams, partner-in-charge of the Indianapolis office of Benesch, said the firm’s biggest office in Cleveland has an attorney who works on the West Coast, but for the nearly 30 attorneys in the Indianapolis office, working at home probably isn’t viable.

“We expect the lawyers to work primarily out of the office, but it’s not unusual for a lawyer to work from home if they have a lunch meeting and don’t want to come all the way downtown,” Abrams said.

“I think (like) most people, if I have an issue for a lawyer who has a niche practice, I would like to walk down the hall and talk to him.”

Not for everyone

Dobbs said that after her first child was born, she encountered the same pitfalls other working mothers face. Between commuting from Noblesville and the demands of parenthood, she said she was falling behind at work. “I tried very hard to keep full time. … Something had to give.

“The firm approached me and asked how they could help,” she said. “I said, ‘I really like what I’m doing, I’d just like to do it less.’”

That’s when Dobbs went on a part-time partner track where she could work on a flex-time schedule. She accepted two-thirds of her full-time salary to work two-thirds full-time billable hours. “It seemed fair to me,” she said.

The work-from-home arrangement began when she lived in Noblesville and continued with her move to Peru. Dobbs said she’s amazed at how much work she gets done at home. She sometimes works before or after the kids are awake. A nanny watches them during her working day, and she takes a break each day to have lunch with her children. But she also makes a clear delineation: “When I’m working, I’m working.”

 

pollydobbs001-15col.jpg Westleigh, the historic home near Peru where Polly Dobbs practices, also is home to Dobbs’ husband and their two children. It was Dobbs’ grandparents’ home and also was once home to Hoosier composer Cole Porter. (Photo by Bethany Brindle)

The transition didn’t convince everyone at the firm. Dobbs said one partner called her office extension just to make sure it rang in her home in Peru.

“I’m very mindful this is sort of a new-age, wacky way to practice law. I work hard to make it seamless on this end,” she said.

Working at home is something that Zelmer said Ice Miller decides on a case-by-case basis, and there’s no way everyone could do it. Many wouldn’t want to.

“Different people have told me, ‘I can’t believe you work from home. I could never do that. I’d get too distracted,’” she said. “When the children are little, you have to set some guidelines that you can’t be interrupted.”

Former Evansville Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel joined Faegre Baker Daniels in Indianapolis in April to work in government relations and economic development. He’s worked from his Evansville home since, but he’s soon to move into new office space. For his purposes, working at home indefinitely wouldn’t do.

“The challenge is, if you want to meet with clients, you don’t want to invite them into your home. You really do need the office space to accommodate that,” he said.

Dobbs said finding her work-life balance continues, sometimes in unexpected ways.

“One thing I wasn’t ready for,” she said, “is the work is always here. I never leave it. After the kids are in bed, I don’t feel like I can sit on the couch next to my husband. I haven’t found that line yet.”

But she’s working on it.

“I so much appreciate everything Bingham has done,” she said. “I’m going to bend over backward to make it work out.”•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. "Am I bugging you? I don't mean to bug ya." If what I wrote below is too much social philosophy for Indiana attorneys, just take ten this vacay to watch The Lego Movie with kiddies and sing along where appropriate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etzMjoH0rJw

  2. I've got some free speech to share here about who is at work via the cat's paw of the ACLU stamping out Christian observances.... 2 Thessalonians chap 2: "And we also thank God continually because, when you received the word of God, which you heard from us, you accepted it not as a human word, but as it actually is, the word of God, which is indeed at work in you who believe. For you, brothers and sisters, became imitators of God’s churches in Judea, which are in Christ Jesus: You suffered from your own people the same things those churches suffered from the Jews who killed the Lord Jesus and the prophets and also drove us out. They displease God and are hostile to everyone in their effort to keep us from speaking to the Gentiles so that they may be saved. In this way they always heap up their sins to the limit. The wrath of God has come upon them at last."

  3. Did someone not tell people who have access to the Chevy Volts that it has a gas engine and will run just like a normal car? The batteries give the Volt approximately a 40 mile range, but after that the gas engine will propel the vehicle either directly through the transmission like any other car, or gas engine recharges the batteries depending on the conditions.

  4. Catholic, Lutheran, even the Baptists nuzzling the wolf! http://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/judicial-watch-documents-reveal-obama-hhs-paid-baptist-children-family-services-182129786-four-months-housing-illegal-alien-children/ YET where is the Progressivist outcry? Silent. I wonder why?

  5. Thank you, Honorable Ladies, and thank you, TIL, for this interesting interview. The most interesting question was the last one, which drew the least response. Could it be that NFP stamps are a threat to the very foundation of our common law American legal tradition, a throwback to the continental system that facilitated differing standards of justice? A throwback to Star Chamber’s protection of the landed gentry? If TIL ever again interviews this same panel, I would recommend inviting one known for voicing socio-legal dissent for the masses, maybe Welch, maybe Ogden, maybe our own John Smith? As demographics shift and our social cohesion precipitously drops, a consistent judicial core will become more and more important so that Justice and Equal Protection and Due Process are yet guiding stars. If those stars fall from our collective social horizon (and can they be seen even now through the haze of NFP opinions?) then what glue other than more NFP decisions and TRO’s and executive orders -- all backed by more and more lethally armed praetorians – will prop up our government institutions? And if and when we do arrive at such an end … will any then dare call that tyranny? Or will the cost of such dissent be too high to justify?

ADVERTISEMENT