Recent Blog Posts

Firms target of e-mail scams

November 23, 2009
Comments(0)
Law firms are being warned that they are the target of “spear phishing” e-mails. The FBI sent out an advisory last week which said that it believed hackers were targeting U.S. law firms and public relations firms. The hackers are spear...
More

Diverse in diversity thinking

November 19, 2009
Comments(0)
When the word diversity first comes to mind, you may think of people of different ethnicities, races, or gender. And that’s become the problem because “diversity” has become a bit stagnant in what people think makes up a diverse population and...
More

Super lawyers, super schools?

November 17, 2009
Comments(0)
Move over U.S. News and World Report law school rankings, there’s a new list in town, and it’s from the same people who pick Super Lawyers. According to Super Lawyers magazine, the University of Notre Dame Law School ranks 43; right...
More

Law school as an investment

November 16, 2009
Comments(2)
Should the decision of whether or not to go to law school be made just as one would when deciding what stocks to buy for their 401k or invest in an IRA? Professor Herwig Schlunk at Vanderbilt University Law School thinks...
More

Loan help for unemployed

November 11, 2009
Comments(0)
In a story in the Nov. 11 issue of Indiana Lawyer , recent law school graduate Amanda Whipple wished for assistance in repaying student loans for unemployed attorneys who volunteer at nonprofit or legal services organizations. Amanda may get her wish,...
More

Tough times for lawyers

November 9, 2009
Comments(0)
It’s been a tough year for attorneys, especially associates, according to the National Law Journal’s 2009 NLJ 250. In fact, the publication reports that this is the worst year for attorneys as far as how many are practicing since it began...
More

Committing crime in court

November 5, 2009
Comment(1)
If you’re going to court for a child custody hearing and you want to present yourself in the best light to the judge, don’t beat up your kid’s mom in the courtroom. Owen Circuit Judge Frank Nardi overheard a commotion...
More

Students sue over pics

November 2, 2009
Comments(0)
Perhaps this suit can be a lesson to the generation growing up with MySpace, Facebook, and cell phones: What you post online can come back to haunt you. Two high school sophomores in northern Indiana are suing their principal and the...
More

Playing dress up

October 29, 2009
Comments(0)
Do law offices have Halloween parties? Lawyers don’t strike me as the type to have an office Halloween party, or even don a costume in the office, but I could be mistaken. In case you do have an office Halloween party,...
More

Smoking bans in Indiana

October 26, 2009
Comments(0)
Smoking bans in bars and restaurants always create a spirited debate between smokers and nonsmokers. Every time a city or county in Indiana moves to ban smoking in these establishments, people pipe up with their opinions. Marion County may be the...
More

No death penalty, more cash

October 22, 2009
Comments(0)
Proponents of abolishing the death penalty have argued for years it costs more to sentence someone to death and execute them than it does to have that person sit in prison for life. A report released this week is taking advantage...
More

Rock out to benefit agency

October 21, 2009
Comments(0)
Don’t let the name fool you: You don’t need black ties or fancy dresses to attend the first Marion County Public Defender Agency’s Public Defenders’ Ball. You just need $7 bucks and the desire to hear musicians play. The Marion County...
More

Free speech gets a week

October 20, 2009
Comments(0)
Most Americans should know they have the freedom of speech, thanks to the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, but they may not know there’s a week commemorating the right. This week marks the annual National Freedom of Speech Week,...
More

Fest to show legal movies

October 15, 2009
Comments(0)
Reporter Rebecca Berfanger wrote this post. If you’re looking to see some uplifting movies that probably won’t be at a cineplex near you any time soon, while supporting an Indianapolis tradition, check out the Heartland Film Festival, which runs today...
More

No compassion in court

October 12, 2009
Comments(0)
Should a judge be criticized by her peers for being compassionate to a couple in foreclosure? Yes, according to the 3rd District Court of Appeals, who disapproved of a Miami-Dade Circuit judge’s decision to give a couple an extra month to...
More

An advocate remembered

October 9, 2009
Comment(1)
IL reporter Rebecca Berfanger fills in for Jennifer Nelson with this post : When Indiana Lawyer started to hear about the recent death of a prominent domestic violence victim’s advocate, comments about the attorney just kept coming from the legal community...
More

Economy’s effect on diversity

October 7, 2009
Comments(0)
According to the Minority Law Journal’s Minority Experience Study, minorities are feeling the effect of the economy worse than their Caucasian counterparts. The survey asked midlevel associates (third-, fourth-, and fifth-year associates) a series of questions, including whether they were actively...
More

IU – Indy’s Diversity week

October 5, 2009
Comments(0)
If we want law firms and legal offices to be more diverse, we should encourage diversity and inclusion at an earlier stage in the legal career, such as while in law school. Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis is doing...
More

Perfect law school

September 30, 2009
Comments(0)
We recently posed the question “What’s the best way for people to become attorneys?” Your choices were: at law school as it is now, through apprenticeships like back in the day, and a hybrid of law school with real-life experience. Not...
More

Access to SCOTUS

September 28, 2009
Comments(0)
The Supreme Court of the United States of America will hold its opening conferences Tuesday. In honor of the beginning of a new year on the court and Justice Sonia Sotomayor joining, C-SPAN has created “Supreme Court Week” beginning Oct. 4...
More

IBA also not happy with Gov

September 23, 2009
Comment(1)
First the Indiana State Bar Association issued a statement saying Gov. Mitch Daniels’ comments in the press regarding the “voter ID” decision last week weren’t “helpful in advancing the appropriate respect for the courts and the judicial process.” Now, the Indianapolis...
More

ISBA calls out the Gov

September 21, 2009
Comments(2)
The Indiana State Bar Association wants the governor to know it didn’t appreciate his comments regarding the Court of Appeals’ ruling on our voter ID law, so it issued a statement late Friday afternoon. It’s short and to the (polite) point:...
More

Judge uses football in opinion

September 17, 2009
Comment(1)
You know it’s football season when a judge references two National Football League teams in his opinion. Chief Judge Frank Easterbrook in the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals must love football, or think that the sport is something most people understand...
More

Name study seems flawed

September 16, 2009
Comment(1)
Samantha, you should just go by Sam. Alexandra should stick to Alex. If your name is Robin, Terry, or Pat, you’ll probably be OK, according to a new study that says women with more masculine sounding names have a better chance...
More

Tailgating with CLE

September 14, 2009
Comments(0)
Grilling, drinking, socializing with friends – these things go along with tailgating before football games. At one Indiana law school, CLE classes are also part of the mix. At Notre Dame Law School, two-credit CLE programs are offered before select home...
More

Page  << 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 >> pager
ADVERTISEMENT
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
  1. OK so I'll make this as short as I can. I got a call that my daughter was smoking in the bathroom only her and one other girl was questioned mind you four others left before them anyways they proceeded to interrogate my daughter about smoking and all this time I nor my parents got a phone call,they proceeded to go through her belongings and also pretty much striped searched my daughter including from what my mother said they looked at her Brest without my consent. I am furious also a couple months ago my son hurt his foot and I was never called and it got worse during the day but the way some of the teachers have been treating my kids they are not comfortable going to them because they feel like they are mean or don't care. This is unacceptable in my mind i should be able to send my kids to school without worry but now I worry how the adults there are treating them. I have a lot more but I wanted to know do I have any attempt at a lawsuit because like I said there is more that's just some of what my kids are going through. Please respond. Sincerely concerned single parent

  2. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) End of Year Report 2014. (page 13) Under the current system many local registering agencies are challenged just keeping up with registration paperwork. It takes an hour or more to process each registrant, the majority of whom are low risk offenders. As a result law enforcement cannot monitor higher risk offenders more intensively in the community due to the sheer numbers on the registry. Some of the consequences of lengthy and unnecessary registration requirements actually destabilize the life’s of registrants and those -such as families- whose lives are often substantially impacted. Such consequences are thought to raise levels of known risk factors while providing no discernible benefit in terms of community safety. The full report is available online at. http://www.casomb.org/index.cfm?pid=231 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) US Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs United States of America. The overall conclusion is that Megan’s law has had no demonstrated effect on sexual offenses in New Jersey, calling into question the justification for start-up and operational costs. Megan’s Law has had no effect on time to first rearrest for known sex offenders and has not reduced sexual reoffending. Neither has it had an impact on the type of sexual reoffense or first-time sexual offense. The study also found that the law had not reduced the number of victims of sexual offenses. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/app/publications/abstract.aspx? ID=247350 The University of Chicago Press for The Booth School of Business of the University of Chicago and The University of Chicago Law School Article DOI: 10.1086/658483 Conclusion. The data in these three data sets do not strongly support the effectiveness of sex offender registries. The national panel data do not show a significant decrease in the rate of rape or the arrest rate for sexual abuse after implementation of a registry via the Internet. The BJS data that tracked individual sex offenders after their release in 1994 did not show that registration had a significantly negative effect on recidivism. And the D.C. crime data do not show that knowing the location of sex offenders by census block can help protect the locations of sexual abuse. This pattern of noneffectiveness across the data sets does not support the conclusion that sex offender registries are successful in meeting their objectives of increasing public safety and lowering recidivism rates. The full report is available online at. http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/658483 These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of conclusions and reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. People, including the media and other organizations should not rely on and reiterate the statements and opinions of the legislators or other people as to the need for these laws because of the high recidivism rates and the high risk offenders pose to the public which simply is not true and is pure hyperbole and fiction. They should rely on facts and data collected and submitted in reports from the leading authorities and credible experts in the fields such as the following. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 0.8% (page 30) The full report is available online at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Adult_Research_Branch/Research_Documents/2014_Outcome_Evaluation_Report_7-6-2015.pdf California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) (page 38) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 1.8% The full report is available online at. http://www.google.com/url?sa= t&source=web&cd=1&ved= 0CCEQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F% 2Fwww.cdcr.ca.gov%2FAdult_ Research_Branch%2FResearch_ documents%2FOutcome_ evaluation_Report_2013.pdf&ei= C9dSVePNF8HfoATX-IBo&usg=AFQjCNE9I6ueHz-o2mZUnuxLPTyiRdjDsQ Bureau of Justice Statistics 5 PERCENT OF SEX OFFENDERS REARRESTED FOR ANOTHER SEX CRIME WITHIN 3 YEARS OF PRISON RELEASE WASHINGTON, D.C. Within 3 years following their 1994 state prison release, 5.3 percent of sex offenders (men who had committed rape or sexual assault) were rearrested for another sex crime, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. The full report is available online at. http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/press/rsorp94pr.cfm Document title; A Model of Static and Dynamic Sex Offender Risk Assessment Author: Robert J. McGrath, Michael P. Lasher, Georgia F. Cumming Document No.: 236217 Date Received: October 2011 Award Number: 2008-DD-BX-0013 Findings: Study of 759 adult male offenders under community supervision Re-arrest rate: 4.6% after 3-year follow-up The sexual re-offense rates for the 746 released in 2005 are much lower than what many in the public have been led to expect or believe. These low re-offense rates appear to contradict a conventional wisdom that sex offenders have very high sexual re-offense rates. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/236217.pdf Document Title: SEX OFFENDER SENTENCING IN WASHINGTON STATE: RECIDIVISM RATES BY: Washington State Institute For Public Policy. A study of 4,091 sex offenders either released from prison or community supervision form 1994 to 1998 and examined for 5 years Findings: Sex Crime Recidivism Rate: 2.7% Link to Report: http://www.oncefallen.com/files/Washington_SO_Recid_2005.pdf Document Title: Indiana’s Recidivism Rates Decline for Third Consecutive Year BY: Indiana Department of Correction 2009. The recidivism rate for sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05%, one of the lowest in the nation. In a time when sex offenders continue to face additional post-release requirements that often result in their return to prison for violating technical rules such as registration and residency restrictions, the instances of sex offenders returning to prison due to the commitment of a new sex crime is extremely low. Findings: sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05% Link to Report: http://www.in.gov/idoc/files/RecidivismRelease.pdf Once again, These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. No one can doubt that child sexual abuse is traumatic and devastating. The question is not whether the state has an interest in preventing such harm, but whether current laws are effective in doing so. Megan’s law is a failure and is destroying families and their children’s lives and is costing tax payers millions upon millions of dollars. The following is just one example of the estimated cost just to implement SORNA which many states refused to do. From Justice Policy Institute. Estimated cost to implement SORNA Here are some of the estimates made in 2009 expressed in 2014 current dollars: California, $66M; Florida, $34M; Illinois, $24M; New York, $35M; Pennsylvania, $22M; Texas, $44M. In 2014 dollars, Virginia’s estimate for implementation was $14M, and the annual operating cost after that would be $10M. For the US, the total is $547M. That’s over half a billion dollars – every year – for something that doesn’t work. http://www.justicepolicy.org/images/upload/08-08_FAC_SORNACosts_JJ.pdf. Attempting to use under-reporting to justify the existence of the registry is another myth, or a lie. This is another form of misinformation perpetrated by those who either have a fiduciary interest in continuing the unconstitutional treatment of a disfavored group or are seeking to justify their need for punishment for people who have already paid for their crime by loss of their freedom through incarceration and are now attempting to reenter society as honest citizens. When this information is placed into the public’s attention by naive media then you have to wonder if the media also falls into one of these two groups that are not truly interested in reporting the truth. Both of these groups of people that have that type of mentality can be classified as vigilantes, bullies, or sociopaths, and are responsible for the destruction of our constitutional values and the erosion of personal freedoms in this country. I think the media or other organizations need to do a in depth investigation into the false assumptions and false data that has been used to further these laws and to research all the collateral damages being caused by these laws and the unconstitutional injustices that are occurring across the country. They should include these injustices in their report so the public can be better informed on what is truly happening in this country on this subject. Thank you for your time.

  3. Freedom as granted in the Constitution cannot be summarily disallowed without Due Process. Unable to to to the gym, church, bowling alley? What is this 1984 level nonsense? Congrats to Brian for having the courage to say that this was enough! and Congrats to the ACLU on the win!

  4. America's hyper-phobia about convicted sex offenders must end! Politicians must stop pandering to knee-jerk public hysteria. And the public needs to learn the facts. Research by the California Sex Offender Management Board as shown a recidivism rate for convicted sex offenders of less than 1%. Less than 1%! Furthermore, research shows that by year 17 after their conviction, a convicted sex offender is no more likely to commit a new sex offense than any other member of the public. Put away your torches and pitchforks. Get the facts. Stop hysteria.

  5. He was convicted 23 years ago. How old was he then? He probably was a juvenile. People do stupid things, especially before their brain is fully developed. Why are we continuing to punish him in 2016? If he hasn't re-offended by now, it's very, very unlikely he ever will. He paid for his mistake sufficiently. Let him live his life in peace.

ADVERTISEMENT