Americans aren’t impressed with US Supreme Court

July 9, 2014
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

A recent national phone survey has found that a little more than a quarter of likely U.S. voters think the Supreme Court of the United States is doing a good or excellent job. The same amount rated the justices’ performance as poor.

The Rasmussen Report’s findings aren’t anything new, the organization says, noting that the figures are consistent with findings from the past year. Those polled by Rasmussen Reports have typically given low marks to the high court – the last time good or excellent marks for the justices were above 40 percent was in October 2009.  

A third of those recently polled say the high court is too liberal; 30 percent claim it’s too conservative.

Rasmussen Reports chalks up the low approval rates to the belief by many that the justices base their decisions on their own political agenda rather than the law.

Other highlights from the mid-June survey:

•    Republicans are the most critical of the court’s performance.
•    Women and middle-aged adults have the most positive opinion of the court.
•    Almost half of those polled believe it is fair for a U.S. senator to oppose a Supreme Court nominee because of political ideology or judicial philosophy.
•    Only 33 percent of those polled believe most judges in their rulings follow the letter of the law.

You can view more data from the report at Rasmussen Report’s website.

These surveys asking people about the U.S. justices sound like a broken record. Last year, Reader’s Digest released a list of the “100 Most Trusted People in America” and TV Judge Judith Sheindlin, aka Judge Judy, was more trusted than all of the U.S. justices.  A 2012 Gallup poll said a majority of Republicans think the court is too liberal and more than a third of Democrats saw the court as too conservative.

As many surveys point out, people’s opinions can be swayed by the rulings issued by the justices, as was the case in 2012 with the health care rulings.


 

ADVERTISEMENT
  • hmm
    Well, maybe it's because they are unelected, and, they have a tendency to strike down laws by elected officials from all over the country. When you have been taught that "Democracy" is something almost sacred, then, you will have a tendency to frown on such imperious conduct. Lawyers get acculturated in law school into thinking that this is the very essence of high minded government, but to people who are more heavily than King George ever did, they may not like it. Thanks for the information.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
  1. Don't we have bigger issues to concern ourselves with?

  2. Anyone who takes the time to study disciplinary and bar admission cases in Indiana ... much of which is, as a matter of course and by intent, off the record, would have a very difficult time drawing lines that did not take into account things which are not supposed to matter, such as affiliations, associations, associates and the like. Justice Hoosier style is a far departure than what issues in most other parts of North America. (More like Central America, in fact.) See, e.g., http://www.theindianalawyer.com/indiana-attorney-illegally-practicing-in-florida-suspended-for-18-months/PARAMS/article/42200 When while the Indiana court system end the cruel practice of killing prophets of due process and those advocating for blind justice?

  3. Wouldn't this call for an investigation of Government corruption? Chief Justice Loretta Rush, wrote that the case warranted the high court’s review because the method the Indiana Court of Appeals used to reach its decision was “a significant departure from the law.” Specifically, David wrote that the appellate panel ruled after reweighing of the evidence, which is NOT permissible at the appellate level. **But yet, they look the other way while an innocent child was taken by a loving mother who did nothing wrong"

  4. Different rules for different folks....

  5. I would strongly suggest anyone seeking mediation check the experience of the mediator. There are retired judges who decide to become mediators. Their training and experience is in making rulings which is not the point of mediation.

ADVERTISEMENT