ILNews

Bottling up generics

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
Indiana Lawyer Focus
The federal government recently asked the Supreme Court of the United States to put a stop to a pharmaceutical industry practice that’s become common enough to earn the shorthand legal description “pay to delay.”

The Federal Trade Commission sued over the practice whereby drugmakers agree to provide generic-drug manufacturers a “reverse payment settlement” to delay patent challenges that could allow less-expensive generics to be brought to market. The FTC claims “pay to delay” arrangements violate antitrust laws, and an FTC study says such deals cost consumers and taxpayers $3.5 billion annually in higher drug costs.

FTC v. Actavis Inc., 12-416, was argued March 25, and justices are presented with divergent rulings from two U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeal. The 11th Circuit affirmed a District Court ruling in Actavis that reverse payments were lawful so long as they did not restrain trade beyond the way that patents typically do. The 3rd Circuit, meanwhile, held in In re K-Dur Antitrust Litig., 686 F.3D 197 (2012), that such arrangements are presumed anticompetitive and unlawful.

It’s not just patent law at issue in Actavis. The 1984 Hatch-Waxman Act – officially the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act – encourages production of lower-cost generic drugs and gives generic makers incentives and avenues to bring patent challenges.

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co., the fifth-largest pharmaceutical manufacturer in the U.S., has not filed an amicus brief in Actavis, according to Director of Global Corporate Communications Mark E. Taylor. Lilly had no comment on the litigation, Taylor said.

But it’s clear from court filings that Lilly opposes the FTC’s position. Lilly Vice President and General Patent Counsel Douglas K. Norman is a signer of an amicus brief in Actavis

filed on behalf of the Intellectual Property Owners Association.

The brief says the Hatch-Waxman Act has fostered an environment in which generic makers file patent challenges regardless of their chances of success, sometimes doing so without putting their products on the market.

“Data collected by the Federal Trade Commission show that generic drug makers have raced one another to challenge innovators’ patents, and that they have compelling incentives to do so with little or no regard for the merits of those challenges,” the IPOA brief says.

“There is no basis in law or logic to require the settling parties in a Hatch-Waxman case to overcome a presumption of illegality in order to justify a reverse payment settlement. To create such a requirement would negate the well-established statutory presumption of a patent’s validity,” the brief says. “Instead, the court should hold that the objectives of the antitrust laws are met by asking whether the settlement unreasonably restrains trade outside the scope of the patent in question and allowing the parties to reach an arm’s-length bargain where no such impact is apparent.”

Faegre Baker Daniels LLP partner Aime Peele Carter also has joined an amicus brief in opposition to the FTC as a member of the board of the American Intellectual Property Lawyers Association. The group agrees that the justices should use a scope-of-patent test to determine whether pay-to-delay agreements should be allowed.

U.S. Deputy Solicitor General Malcolm L. Stewart argued on behalf of the FTC that such a test would restrict legitimate challenges. “There’s nothing in the Patent Act that says you can pay your competitor not to engage in conduct that you believe to be infringing,” Stewart told the justices.

California attorney Jeffrey I. Weinberger argued before the justices on behalf of Actavis and other drugmakers that the scope-of-patent test would rectify what he called a loophole in Hatch-Waxman.

“In any other industry a potential challenger has to make a major investment in a product, has to get it manufactured, has to put it on sale, and then litigate. And if they lose, they are going to be liable for enormous damages. That’s not the case under Hatch-Waxman,” Weinberger argued. “If they lose (a patent challenge), they haven’t lost anything. They just walk away.”

The American IP Lawyers Association, Carter said, “is taking the position that when you look at this in broad brushstrokes, Hatch-Waxman shifted the burden and the risk for generic manufacturers by allowing them to start to take steps to get to market sooner, and because of that, there’s been a growth of different ways to resolve those potential challenges to the patentee,” including reverse payment settlements.

“What this really gets to is the fundamental tension between federal antitrust laws and inventors who want to gain a patent to have a monopoly for a certain number of years,” Carter said. “I think anyone who’s involved in health care or pharmaceutical preparation at all is interested in this, whether it’s on the generic or the branded side.”

Don Knebel is a senior adviser to the Center for Intellectual Property Research at Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington and a veteran antitrust and IP attorney at Barnes & Thornburg LLP. He also is an adjunct professor at Maurer who teaches intellectual property antitrust.

For years, pharmaceutical companies largely assumed they were on firm legal footing in offering settlements to generic makers to fend off patent challenges, Knebel said. Pharmaceutical makers could retain a revenue stream from their patented drugs and generic producers could receive an agreeable, negotiated sum to drop their challenges for a specified time.

The 3rd Circuit ruling changed that, Knebel said. “Now, it is essentially up for grabs.”

“The FTC has been arguing for years, and on what I would consider a crusade, to stop these agreements,” Knebel said.

Knebel has represented clients on both sides of the issue, and both sides present compelling arguments. The court could determine that reverse payment settlements are always legal, never legal, or must be decided on a case-by-case basis, he said.

“Until this issue is resolved by the Supreme Court, I think branded pharmaceutical companies are going to be reluctant to enter into these agreements,” he added.

However the court decides, Knebel doesn’t believe the outcome will harm innovation. He said pharmaceutical companies will still have an incentive to produce new products to win patents, and generic makers will continue to be motivated to challenge those patents.•
ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Did someone not tell people who have access to the Chevy Volts that it has a gas engine and will run just like a normal car? The batteries give the Volt approximately a 40 mile range, but after that the gas engine will propel the vehicle either directly through the transmission like any other car, or gas engine recharges the batteries depending on the conditions.

  2. Catholic, Lutheran, even the Baptists nuzzling the wolf! http://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/judicial-watch-documents-reveal-obama-hhs-paid-baptist-children-family-services-182129786-four-months-housing-illegal-alien-children/ YET where is the Progressivist outcry? Silent. I wonder why?

  3. Thank you, Honorable Ladies, and thank you, TIL, for this interesting interview. The most interesting question was the last one, which drew the least response. Could it be that NFP stamps are a threat to the very foundation of our common law American legal tradition, a throwback to the continental system that facilitated differing standards of justice? A throwback to Star Chamber’s protection of the landed gentry? If TIL ever again interviews this same panel, I would recommend inviting one known for voicing socio-legal dissent for the masses, maybe Welch, maybe Ogden, maybe our own John Smith? As demographics shift and our social cohesion precipitously drops, a consistent judicial core will become more and more important so that Justice and Equal Protection and Due Process are yet guiding stars. If those stars fall from our collective social horizon (and can they be seen even now through the haze of NFP opinions?) then what glue other than more NFP decisions and TRO’s and executive orders -- all backed by more and more lethally armed praetorians – will prop up our government institutions? And if and when we do arrive at such an end … will any then dare call that tyranny? Or will the cost of such dissent be too high to justify?

  4. This is easily remedied, and in a fashion that every church sacrificing incense for its 501c3 status and/or graveling for government grants should have no problem with ..... just add this statue, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capitoline_she-wolf_Musei_Capitolini_MC1181.jpg entitled, "Jesus and Cousin John learn to suckle sustenance from the beloved Nanny State." Heckfire, the ACLU might even help move the statue in place then. And the art will certainly reflect our modern life, given the clergy's full-bellied willingness to accede to every whim of the new caesars. If any balk, just threaten to take away their government milk … they will quiet down straightaway, I assure you. Few, if any of them, are willing to cross the ruling elite as did the real J&J

  5. Tina has left the building.

ADVERTISEMENT