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Child support changes targeting the rich?

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Indiana Lawyer Focus

A case before the Indiana Court of Appeals calls into question the constitutionality of the state’s new child support guidelines, challenging the revisions that last year altered the payment scheme for high-income earners and raised the ceiling on child support obligations.

The case has the potential to impact custody and divorce dockets throughout the state, raising an issue that is being watched nationally and drawing some family law organizations to criticize what’s being dubbed “hidden alimony.” Some say it goes against the purpose of child support.

In Allan C. Bir v. Cynthia Bir, No. 06A01-1009-DR-449, a divorced father and mother are battling over the extent to which the father owes child support. Allan Bir is an Indianapolis businessman who owns Mi-Tech Metals, and he and his wife Cynthia Bir filed for divorce in early 2008 after 18 years of marriage. The trial court later that year approved a preliminary entry for $4,300 per month in support of the couple’s two minor children.

After Indiana’s revisions to its child support guidelines took effect in 2010, Cynthia filed a motion to modify that child support based on the new income calculations that came to fruition in 2009. This was the first revision of its kind in years, and it changed the mathematical formula the state had used to calculate child support for more than 20 years.

In making its amendment recommendations, the state Judicial Conference domestic relations committee used differing economic data and methodologies to determine weekly support payments for different income ranges and how to apportion the obligations between parents.

Previously, multiple factors were entered into a formula for a particular child support calculation, and the most substantial ones were the parents’ respective incomes. But the former guidelines put less weight on those once a parent’s income reached $4,000 a week or $208,000 a year, and the child support obligation would essentially “plateau.”

The revised guidelines eliminated that “plateau effect,” meaning that a child support obligation now continues increasing directly as income increases – regardless of the particular child or family situations that might be at play. The modifications aren’t automatic or even guaranteed, and it’s up to each local court to review a particular matter to determine if an increase is warranted.

In the Bir case, both parties disagree about what the increase should look like. Allan had previously been paying $4,300 a month, but the new guidelines called for more. Cynthia told the court that she wanted the children to continue enjoying the same lifestyle as they’d had prior to the separation, including traveling abroad. She testified that they’d previously been able to use the family’s private plane but now have to travel commercially, and they have also had to cut back on special trips.

David David

In mid-2010, Boone Circuit Judge Steven David – who has since been elevated to the state’s Supreme Court – held a hearing on that matter and ultimately issued his own order about what the Bir payments should look like.

Though the new guidelines recommended a weekly support obligation of about $37,786 per week, Judge David determined that significant 3,678 percent increase was not warranted. Nothing in the family’s case had changed since the previous amount was approved, he ruled, and that hike would be “unjust.”

Instead, the trial judge issued a provisional order that increased the amount from $4,300 a month to $36,980 per month – a 760 percent increase, on top of what his attorneys say he pays separately for private school and other items.

Citing his children’s expenses, Allan filed a motion to review the provisional child support order on the grounds that the children only needed $8,600 per month and that the father’s budget is not now inadequate or unreasonable.

Judge David denied the motion to correct, and Allan appealed.

While briefing is in its early stages before the Court of Appeals, the Bose McKinney & Evans legal team representing Allan filed an emergency transfer request to the Indiana Supreme Court in mid-November.

The attorneys argued that the guidelines are unconstitutional and the Indiana Court of Appeals doesn’t have the authority to go against them, so the justices needed to decide the issue first. The mother’s attorneys argued that at the trial level, Judge David had deviated from the guidelines’ proscribed amount and issued a provisional order calling for less than a quarter of the amount suggested by the guidelines, and so a constitutional challenge wasn’t ripe for review by the higher court.

Bryan Babb Babb

Both sides disagreed on whether this case raised an issue of great public importance. With Justice David recusing himself on the case he’d handled as a trial-level judge, the other four justices denied the emergency transfer request and left jurisdiction with the intermediate appellate court.

Briefs in the Bir case describe the weekly incomes at less than $10,000 using an “income shares model,” while the incomes higher than $10,000 a week are described as using a “percentage of obligor income model” or “assumption.”

Allan’s attorneys argue that it simply does not take $37,786 weekly or almost $2 million a year to raise two children. The father argues that the guidelines produced “arbitrary and capricious awards” and denied him due process and equal protection, since lower income earners aren’t considered the same way when calculating their child support obligations.

Attorneys for Allan argue, in part, that the new guidelines will fuel more litigation and cause more problems for families and children facing divorces and custody issues. But Cynthia’s attorneys disagreed, saying that it should actually help parties reach agreements in these cases.

Mulvaney Karl Mulvaney

“While litigation may have a negative impact on the children of divorced parents, the potential for litigation is not a result of the Guidelines, but a result of divorced parents’ refusal to use the Guidelines in a reasonable attempt to reach an amicable agreement,” attorney Karl Mulvaney with Bingham McHale wrote in the brief. “Parents dissolving their marriage are capable of setting the tone and bear the responsibility of working toward amicable resolutions of their disputes and protecting their children from the effects of litigation. Ultimately, the impact of litigation on a small number of families, especially when it could be controlled by the parties themselves, is not an issue of great public importance.”

Other states have addressed the issue, the briefs state. Appellate courts in Hawaii, Kentucky, Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, Missouri, and Texas have touched on impermissible takings and what constitutes “something other than child support.” At this point, the mother’s attorneys haven’t filed a brief addressing the constitutional claims and instead focused on the procedural and jurisdictional issues related to the emergency transfer.

A trio of family-focused organizations have signaled their interest in this case and the overarching issue, signing on as amicus curiae parties in the emergency transfer request. The American Coalition for Fathers and Children, the Institute for the American Family, and Fathers and Families are watching the outcome and say it could have long-term impacts on policy and statutory development not only inside Indiana but nationally.

The groups pushed for quick resolution of this case not only for the Bir children, but because they, in an amicus brief, argued that this could jeopardize Indiana’s ability to receive federal funding as a result of “insufficient economic data at the high earner level.”

“There are issues in this case which directly address the intersection of federal and state policies and statutes,” wrote the IAF, pointing to topics such as whether state child support guidelines comply with Criminal Federal Rule § 302.56 that requires states to consider “economic data on case data” and the cost of raising children in setting these types of guidelines. “Unrealistic, excessive child support orders such as the one issued in Bir v. Bir do not promote shared parenting; instead they promote the opposite by pitting parents against one another in litigation and creating situations where one parent feels disadvantaged.”•

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  • Child Support
    Child support should be a case by case basis. If the mother or father has sole custody and the other was the sole income provider, that individual should provide care for the child that maintains the children's current lifestyle. There should never be incentive to get a divorce. Hamilton County's divorce rate along with the world rate is too high because it's too easy.
  • lack of legal or statutory definition of child support in Indiana Code
    The Indiana Supreme Court justices seem to have forgotte the Kansas "Three Pony Rule," which states that "'no child, no matter how wealthy the parents, needs to be provided [with] more than three ponies.'" (quoting In re Patterson, 920 P.2d 450, 455 (Kan. App. 1996)). I actually have a challenge for the Indiana Supreme Court. I challenge the court to show any litigant or practitioner a legal or statutory definition of child support in either the Indiana Code or the child support guidelines so that both litigants and judges can determine what the "...just and appropriate award" required by the Family Support Act should be in a given case in order to have a reference standard to compare the presumptive award to for review and rebuttal. This legal or statutory definition would also allow judges to determine if the guidelines had been applied fairly and appropriately in a given case, which is also a requirement of the Family Support Act. And for the record, the phrase "based on the premise" in both the Indiana Code and the Child Support Guidelines indicates that the statements following the phrase are a goal or statement of purpose, which is not the same as a legal or statutory definition...
  • shared responsibility
    This is the same issue that I have brought up with family court judges here in Indiana.

    Child support should be a shared responsibility instead of requiring the non-custodial parent to preserve the dependent children (and by inference, the custodial parents) LIFESTYLE.

    Minnesota allows the creation of a Child Support Plan that includes a special checking account that both parents contribute to in order to share the responsibility for providing for their children's needs.

    Indiana should follow their lead instead of maximizing child support awards in all circumstances just to increase the money the state collects from the Child Support Performance and Incentive Act.

    Child support should be just that - not a profit center for the state.
  • Change Child Support
    I don't think that a man (since they are the non-custodial 99.99% of the time) making more money should be a good enough reason to increase child support if the mother has a part time job (unless the child is severly handicapped). They should make the mother get a full time job before they increase child support.

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    1. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

    2. "Meanwhile small- and mid-size firms are getting squeezed and likely will not survive unless they become a boutique firm." I've been a business attorney in small, and now mid-size firm for over 30 years, and for over 30 years legal consultants have been preaching this exact same mantra of impending doom for small and mid-sized firms -- verbatim. This claim apparently helps them gin up merger opportunities from smaller firms who become convinced that they need to become larger overnight. The claim that large corporations are interested in cost-saving and efficiency has likewise been preached for decades, and is likewise bunk. If large corporations had any real interest in saving money they wouldn't use large law firms whose rates are substantially higher than those of high-quality mid-sized firms.

    3. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

    4. When I hear 'Juvenile Lawyer' I think of an attorney helping a high school aged kid through the court system for a poor decision; like smashing mailboxes. Thank you for opening up my eyes to the bigger picture of the need for juvenile attorneys. It made me sad, but also fascinated, when it was explained, in the sixth paragraph, that parents making poor decisions (such as drug abuse) can cause situations where children need legal representation and aid from a lawyer.

    5. Some in the Hoosier legal elite consider this prayer recommended by the AG seditious, not to mention the Saint who pledged loyalty to God over King and went to the axe for so doing: "Thomas More, counselor of law and statesman of integrity, merry martyr and most human of saints: Pray that, for the glory of God and in the pursuit of His justice, I may be trustworthy with confidences, keen in study, accurate in analysis, correct in conclusion, able in argument, loyal to clients, honest with all, courteous to adversaries, ever attentive to conscience. Sit with me at my desk and listen with me to my clients' tales. Read with me in my library and stand always beside me so that today I shall not, to win a point, lose my soul. Pray that my family may find in me what yours found in you: friendship and courage, cheerfulness and charity, diligence in duties, counsel in adversity, patience in pain—their good servant, and God's first. Amen."

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