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Chinn: Law Day 2012

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iba-chinn-scottEvery year, we celebrate Law Day – the day first proclaimed in 1958 by President Dwight Eisenhower to be set aside to celebrate the rule of law. Following a Congressional resolution passed in 1961, May 1 has been officially designated to celebrate Law Day.

The American Bar Association has been a good steward of Law Day first by proposing it in 1957 and since then providing the nation with themes to consider as we reflect on the ways in which legal process secures freedoms that Americans recognize and share. This year’s Law Day theme unfortunately is stated in the negative: “No Courts, No Justice, No Freedom.” The theme signals the growing crisis of funding decline of court systems across the country and the dramatic consequences to our accepted way of life. ABA President Bill Robinson, a partner at Frost Brown Todd LLC, is a great champion and eloquent spokesperson on this theme and has been carrying the message on behalf of the profession.

These funding issues and their impacts are stark. The stories of hardships on court systems around the country are by now legion. The problems range from one Ohio municipal court system requiring litigants to bring their own paper to the courthouse when filing new cases to the State of New Hampshire’s suspension of all civil jury trials for one year. And dozens of other court systems have experienced all manner of travails in recent years due to decreased funding. The ABA has assembled a comprehensive and sobering online resource list that is highly worth reviewing if even just to note the array of issues from the multitude of locations. (Visit http://www.americanbar.org/groups/public_education/initiatives_awards/law_day_2012.html.)

Closer to home, Indiana appears not to have fared as poorly overall as its sister states in the area of court system resources. Let’s credit the Indiana Supreme Court and our county court systems for keeping the ship of legal state afloat to this point. But that’s not to say there are not problems here too. Indiana courts, like other parts of the public safety and criminal justice systems, are facing budget cuts, employee layoffs, and the need for fee increases to fund even basic court services. And perhaps the biggest threat is yet to come. The property tax revenue losses stemming from the effects of the “circuit breaker” legislation as well as the decline in local income tax proceeds due to the struggling economy of the past few years has put tremendous stress on local budgets throughout the state. The question will become – as it has been posed in so many other states – how will the judiciary and court system fare under these funding stresses?

So, what can we do? My argument is first things first – let’s be aware of these issues so that we are prepared to have meaningful discussions about them as part of the debate about system funding in the Indiana General Assembly, local legislative bodies, and in the profession. Maybe a true crisis won’t hit Indiana, maybe we’ll avert it, but the best chance to do so may lie with a well informed bench and bar. This isn’t someone else’s problem, I suggest, but ours to lead on. Just as we represent our clients, so too can we represent the citizenry in guaranteeing for them the court system they deserve and that our constitutional principles demand.

Let me conclude on a positive note. The 2012 Law Day theme has room in it for inspiration. And the IndyBar’s Paralegal Committee has taken up that cause. Under the leadership of Committee Chair Joanne Alexovich, the Paralegal Committee is conducting a program at the Indianapolis Public Schools’ Shortridge Magnet High School for Law and Public Policy, which is a college preparatory program for students in grades 6-12 focusing on the principles of democracy, justice, respect and service to others. For Law Day, the Committee is showcasing to more than 200 students careers related to the legal field that do not require a law degree in order to present a well rounded perspective of the resources needed within the legal field. The program will include representatives from a variety of careers including paralegals, administrative assistants, bailiffs, legal software specialists, court reporters, information technology specialists, court clerks and probation officers.

Thanks to the Paralegal Committee and thanks in advance to members of the bar for spending a little time reflecting on Law Day and what it means to maintaining a civil society.•

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  1. Just an aside, but regardless of the outcome, I 'm proud of Judge William Hughes. He was the original magistrate on the Home place issue. He ruled for Home Place, and was primaried by Brainard for it. Their tool Poindexter failed to unseat Hughes, who won support for his honesty and courage throughout the county, and he was reelected Judge of Hamilton County's Superior Court. You can still stand for something and survive. Thanks, Judge Hughes!

  2. CCHP's real accomplishment is the 2015 law signed by Gov Pence that basically outlaws any annexation that is forced where a 65% majority of landowners in the affected area disagree. Regardless of whether HP wins or loses, the citizens of Indiana will not have another fiasco like this. The law Gov Pence signed is a direct result of this malgovernance.

  3. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  4. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  5. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

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