12/11 - Applied Professionalism Course for Newly Admitted Attorneys (Fort Wayne)

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Tuesday  December 11, 2012 

Applied Professionalism Course for Newly Admitted Attorneys: Bridging the Gap Between Law School & the Practice

Speakers:
  - David C. Van Gilder, Van Gilder & Tryznka P.C.
  - G. Michael Witte, Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission
  - J. Frank Kimbrough, Judges & Lawyers Assistance Program
  - Judge David J. Avery , Allen County Superior Court
  - Judge Wendy W. Davis, Allen County Superior Court
  - Jeremy L. Reidy, Beckman Lawson LLP
  - Sherrill Wm. Colvin, Haller & Colvin P.C.
  - J. Spencer Feighner, Haller & Colvin P.C.
  - Cynthia Amber, Amber Law Corporation


Topics:
  - Pro Bono
  - IOLTA & Trust Accounts
  - What Happens When a Grievance is Filed
  - JLAP/Lawyer Helping Lawyer Committee
  - Hardball is for TV– Not for Legal Advocacy
  - A Lawyer is Still a Human Being: Practice Survival Guide
  - Electronic Technology/Social Media
  - If I Knew Then What I Know Now

Date: Tuesday, December 11, 2012
Time:
Registration: 8:30 am
Program: 9:00 am - 4:15 pm
(lunch on your own 12:15 pm - 1:00 pm)

Credit hours: 6.0 Applied Professionalism / Ethics Credit

Cost:
1‐3 Years
$75 ACBA Members
$100 Non‐Members

Over 3 Years
$245 ACBA Members
$335 Non‐Members

Location:
Allen County Bar Association, 924 South Calhoun St., Fort Wayne 46802

Provider:
Allen County Bar Association

Contact Information:
Allen County Bar Association
Phone (260) 423-2359
www.allencountybar.org

 

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  1. The practitioners and judges who hail E-filing as the Saviour of the West need to contain their respective excitements. E-filing is federal court requires the practitioner to cram his motion practice into pigeonholes created by IT people. Compound motions or those seeking alternative relief are effectively barred, unless the practitioner wants to receive a tart note from some functionary admonishing about the "problem". E-filing is just another method by which courts and judges transfer their burden to practitioners, who are the really the only powerless components of the system. Of COURSE it is easier for the court to require all of its imput to conform to certain formats, but this imposition does NOT improve the quality of the practice of law and does NOT improve the ability of the practitioner to advocate for his client or to fashion pleadings that exactly conform to his client's best interests. And we should be very wary of the disingenuous pablum about the costs. The courts will find a way to stick it to the practitioner. Lake County is a VERY good example of this rapaciousness. Any one who does not believe this is invited to review the various special fees that system imposes upon practitioners- as practitioners- and upon each case ON TOP of the court costs normal in every case manually filed. Jurisprudence according to Aldous Huxley.

  2. Any attorneys who practice in federal court should be able to say the same as I can ... efiling is great. I have been doing it in fed court since it started way back. Pacer has its drawbacks, but the ability to hit an e-docket and pull up anything and everything onscreen is a huge plus for a litigator, eps the sole practitioner, who lacks a filing clerk and the paralegal support of large firms. Were I an Indiana attorney I would welcome this great step forward.

  3. Can we get full disclosure on lobbyist's payments to legislatures such as Mr Buck? AS long as there are idiots that are disrespectful of neighbors and intent on shooting fireworks every night, some kind of regulations are needed.

  4. I am the mother of the child in this case. My silence on the matter was due to the fact that I filed, both in Illinois and Indiana, child support cases. I even filed supporting documentation with the Indiana family law court. Not sure whether this information was provided to the court of appeals or not. Wish the case was done before moving to Indiana, because no matter what, there is NO WAY the state of Illinois would have allowed an appeal on a child support case!

  5. "No one is safe when the Legislature is in session."

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