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COA: negligence claim should go to trial

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The Marion Superior Court was wrong to grant summary judgment for a company in a home builder’s claims of negligence following the discovery of contaminants on lots in a subdivision, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled.

KB Home Indiana filed suit against Rockville TBD Corp. for damages for negligence, nuisance, and trespass after KB discovered Rockville’s plant years earlier had discharged pollutants into the land that subsequently became a subdivision.

The land used to build the subdivision was farmland owned by George and Patricia Kopetsky. They purchased land next to the predecessor of Rockville, which manufactured airplane parts. The company used chemical solvents, including trichloroethylene, which eventually leached into the ground and surrounding farmland. Use of TCE ended sometime in 1993.

The Kopetskys sold some of their land to Dura Builder to create the Cedar Park residential subdivision. Neither party did an environmental or chemical assessment of the land at that time. In 2001, George Kopetsky learned of the contamination, but didn’t tell Dura or KB, which purchased Dura in 2004, about contamination. After KB learned of the contamination in 2005, it stopped building homes on the land. It then filed its suit in 2007 against Rockville, Kopetsky, and others.

The trial court granted summary judgment to Rockville on all of KB’s claims.

In KB Home Indiana Inc. v. Rockville TBD Corp., No. 49A02-0909-CV-881, the Court of Appeals concluded that the trial court erred in finding the economic loss doctrine precludes KB from pursuing its negligence claim.

Under the economic loss doctrine, a contract is the sole remedy for the failure of a product or service to perform as expected, wrote Chief Judge John Baker. If the plaintiff isn’t seeking damages involving the benefit of the bargain or other matters governed by contract, the economic loss doctrine does not bar a negligence action.

KB didn’t have a contract with Rockville to buy the property, nor did it assert any product liability or comparable claim. Koptesky’s breach of warrant that the land was free of contaminants doesn’t absolve Rockville of responsibility for its negligent conduct that may have caused the contamination, wrote the chief judge.

The appellate court upheld summary judgment for Rockville on KB’s claims of nuisance and trespass. Rockville’s contamination ended in 1993 and it the sold property to a subsequent buyer. Under these circumstance, KB didn’t show that a nuisance existed or was ongoing that could be abated or enjoined. KB also failed to show a departure from the “long-established principle” that a party must possess the land at the time of the activity that causes the alleged trespass, wrote Chief Judge Baker.

The Court of Appeals remanded the cause for trial on KB’s negligence claim.
 

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  1. Hysteria? Really Ben? Tell the young lady reported on in the link below that worrying about the sexualizing of our children is mere hysteria. Such thinking is common in the Royal Order of Jesters and other running sex vacays in Thailand or Brazil ... like Indy's Jared Fogle. Those tempted to call such concerns mere histronics need to think on this: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-12-year-old-girl-live-streamed-her-suicide-it-took-two-weeks-for-facebook-to-take-the-video-down/ar-AAlT8ka?li=AA4ZnC&ocid=spartanntp

  2. This is happening so much. Even in 2016.2017. I hope the father sue for civil rights violation. I hope he sue as more are doing and even without a lawyer as pro-se, he got a good one here. God bless him.

  3. I whole-heartedly agree with Doug Church's comment, above. Indiana lawyers were especially fortunate to benefit from Tom Pyrz' leadership and foresight at a time when there has been unprecedented change in the legal profession. Consider how dramatically computer technology and its role in the practice of law have changed over the last 25 years. The impact of the great recession of 2008 dramatically changed the composition and structure of law firms across the country. Economic pressures altered what had long been a routine, robust annual recruitment process for law students and recent law school graduates. That has, in turn, impacted law school enrollment across the country, placing upward pressure on law school tuition. The internet continues to drive significant changes in the provision of legal services in both public and private sectors. The ISBA has worked to make quality legal representation accessible and affordable for all who need it and to raise general public understanding of Indiana laws and procedures. How difficult it would have been to tackle each of these issues without Tom's leadership. Tom has set the tone for positive change at the ISBA to meet the evolving practice needs of lawyers of all backgrounds and ages. He has led the organization with vision, patience, flexibility, commitment, thoughtfulness & even humor. He will, indeed, be a tough act to follow. Thank you, Tom, for all you've done and all the energy you've invested in making the ISBA an excellent, progressive, highly responsive, all-inclusive, respectful & respected professional association during his tenure there.

  4. The is putting restrictions on vaping just because big tobacco companies are losing money. http://vapingisthefuture.com

  5. Oh, and I should add ... the stigma JLAP attaches lasts forever. As my documents show, I had good reason to reject the many conflicted diagnoses for not thinking like the state wanted me to. BUT when I resisted and raised constitutional and even ADA "regarded as" arguments I was then denied licensed in Indiana for LIFE. As in until death does us part. Evidence in comments here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/scotus-denies-cert-to-kansas-attorney-seeking-to-practice-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/40522 Resistance is futile, comrades.

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