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Column: Does your client's business have a will?

November 9, 2011
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maurer-greg-mug.jpgBy Greg Maurer

With the recent death of Apple founder Steve Jobs, there has been a lot of discussion about the future of the company. In this case, the timing of Jobs’ diagnosis gave the company ample time to prepare a succession plan. Many transitions happen much more suddenly, and the ultimate result of such a transition in the future depends on whether the business owner asks this question today: “What happens to my business if I die tomorrow?”

According to Trusts and Estates Magazine, approximately 90 percent of U.S. businesses are family firms. That’s more than 17 million businesses. These businesses represent 64 percent of our gross domestic product and employ 62 percent of the U.S. workforce. Family businesses have challenges as they move from one generation to the next, from family to institutional ownership or when partners retire or pass on. It is vital to our economy that these transitions happen smoothly, with as little decline in enterprise value as possible. But are today’s business owners planning for succession?

In April, U.S. Trust issued the report “2011 U.S. Trust Insights on Wealth and Worth,” which found that 91 percent of the people surveyed said they have a will, but only three percent of business owners in this group have a business succession plan. When a business owner who is also a day-to-day manager dies, there is both a management and an ownership transition. Each transition creates considerable risk to the long-term value of a business. When occurring simultaneously, the risk increases substantially.

Counsel to business owners who understand what may happen when owners die without a clear succession plan should challenge the owner to answer the question: “What happens to my business if I die tomorrow?” Squabbling children often spend too much time arguing over money and control and not enough time managing the business. Spouses without the requisite business knowledge or experience attempt to manage the business and often fail. Key employees may start looking for more stable ground. Customers may get nervous about the performance of the company. All of these factors may contribute to lower revenues and margins, causing enterprise value to fall. If a sale occurs under a situation of duress rather than strength, the value of the business that the now-deceased owner worked so tirelessly to build will suffer.

The unfortunate circumstances that can occur without a succession plan are likely not new to business and estate planning attorneys. Learning from these experiences should push counsel to proactively advise clients of the dire need for both a management and ownership succession plan.

It is important to identify risks in a transition situation. If the client is an owner-operator, the concerns include not only who will make the decisions reserved for ownership, but also who will make the gritty day-to-day management decisions that preserve and hopefully add value to the enterprise. This process involves discussion with senior management about how decisions will be made. For example, will there be an interim CEO? An executive committee of the board? Both? Once these issues are decided, assurances should be provided to the company’s key stakeholders.

In addition to the management transition plan, a plan to ensure a functioning ownership group is crucial. Careful consideration needs to be given to whether the heirs will be able to function together and make the critical decisions necessary to avoid value degradation. Self-awareness and brutal honesty are critical here.

In both the owner and owner-operator scenarios, it is prudent to consider how much of the intrinsic value of the enterprise is dependent upon a key individual (this is especially true for small law firms). In such cases, key-man insurance is often a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to mitigate this risk. If the client has a business partner, the corporate attorney should ask the partners to consider with whom they would be making decisions if the other partner dies. If working with the partner’s heirs is not palatable (and it rarely is), then a buy-sell agreement coupled with a life insurance policy might be in order.

The overall key to an effective succession plan is communication, and counsel can play a key role as facilitator. If your client can’t answer the question “What happens to my business if I die tomorrow?”, then you have a phone call to make. •
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Greg Maurer is managing director of Heron Capital, an investment firm that oversees Heron Capital Equity Partners, a private equity partnership, and Heron Capital Venture Fund, a health care venture capital fund. In a prior life, he was an attorney at Schiff Hardin in Chicago, Ill. He can be reached at greg@heroncap.com. The opinions expressed in this column are those of the author.

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  1. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  2. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  3. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  4. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  5. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

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