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Commissioner honors 2 judges for juvenile work

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LaPorte Circuit Judge Thomas Alevizos and Marion Superior Judge Marilyn Moores have received the Distinguished Hoosier Award for their work with juveniles.

Judge Alevizos received his award Friday in a ceremony at the LaPorte County Juvenile Center. He was recognized for his strong commitment to the juvenile justice system and rehabilitation of offenders through diversion, education, and re-entry programs.

Judge Moores received her award today at the Marion Juvenile Court. She was recognized for her proactive efforts to develop alternatives to juvenile detention for low-risk youth.

The Distinguished Hoosier Award is one of the highest awards given by the state. It is given at the discretion of the governor to those who have brought honor to the state through their character and accomplishments. Department of Correction Commissioner Edwin Buss presented the awards on behalf of the state.

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  1. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  2. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

  3. I will agree with that as soon as law schools stop lying to prospective students about salaries and employment opportunities in the legal profession. There is no defense to the fraudulent numbers first year salaries they post to mislead people into going to law school.

  4. The sad thing is that no fish were thrown overboard The "greenhorn" who had never fished before those 5 days was interrogated for over 4 hours by 5 officers until his statement was illicited, "I don't want to go to prison....." The truth is that these fish were measured frozen off shore and thawed on shore. The FWC (state) officer did not know fish shrink, so the only reason that these fish could be bigger was a swap. There is no difference between a 19 1/2 fish or 19 3/4 fish, short fish is short fish, the ticket was written. In addition the FWC officer testified at trial, he does not measure fish in accordance with federal law. There was a document prepared by the FWC expert that said yes, fish shrink and if these had been measured correctly they averaged over 20 inches (offshore frozen). This was a smoke and mirror prosecution.

  5. I love this, Dave! Many congrats to you! We've come a long way from studying for the bar together! :)

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