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Court: juveniles can be placed on sex offender registry

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The Indiana Court of Appeals says a ruling by the state justices last year can’t be used to stop juvenile courts from ordering juveniles to register as sex offenders.

In a five-page decision today in C.E.K., II, v. State of Indiana, No. 28A05-1002-JV-100, a three-judge panel affirmed a decision by Greene Circuit Judge Erik C. Allen in a juvenile sex offender case. The juvenile known as C.E.K. was 14 years old when he committed two child molesting acts that would have been Class B and C felonies if committed by an adult. The judge found him to be delinquent and put him on supervised probation until the age of 18, and the state later asked that C.E.K. be placed on the state’s sex offender registry. Judge Allen found him to be “a high risk to re-offend” and ordered that registration, but C.E.K. appealed.

On appeal, C.E.K. argued that the Indiana Supreme Court decision last year in Wallace v. State, 905 N.E. 2d 371 (Ind. 2009), applied to him as a juvenile and didn’t allow for his placement on the sex offender registry. In Wallace, the justices held the registration statute as applied to that defendant was unconstitutional because it constituted retroactive punishment forbidden by the Ex Post Facto Clause of the Indiana Constitution. C.E.K. seized that analysis and argued the juvenile court lacked the subject matter jurisdiction to apply it.

Not the case, according to the intermediate appellate court.

“C.E.K reads too much into Wallace,” Judge Edward Najam wrote for the panel. “The court did not hold that the Act is facially unconstitutional, and C.E.K. does not (and cannot) raise an ex post facto challenge to the juvenile court’s order that he comply with the Act. Further, in a companion case to Wallace, the court held that the Act was ‘non-punitive when applied to’ another defendant. Thus, while the Supreme Court recognized that the Act had punitive elements that forbade its retroactive application under Indiana’s Ex Post Facto Clause, the court did not hold that the Act is a wholly punitive measure that would violate the juvenile court’s rehabilitative policies.”

With that, the appellate court relied on its decade-old holding in K.J.P. v. State, 724 N.E.2d 612, 615 (Ind. Ct. App. 2000), which had rejected another juvenile’s claim that requiring juveniles to register as sex offenders conflicted with the rehabilitative purposes of the state’s juvenile code.
 

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  1. First comment on this thread is a fitting final comment on this thread, as that the MCBA never answered Duncan's fine question, and now even Eric Holder agrees that the MCBA was in material error as to the facts: "I don't get it" from Duncan December 1, 2014 5:10 PM "The Grand Jury met for 25 days and heard 70 hours of testimony according to this article and they made a decision that no crime occurred. On what basis does the MCBA conclude that their decision was "unjust"? What special knowledge or evidence does the MCBA have that the Grand Jury hearing this matter was unaware of? The system that we as lawyers are sworn to uphold made a decision that there was insufficient proof that officer committed a crime. How can any of us say we know better what was right than the jury that actually heard all of the the evidence in this case."

  2. wow is this a bunch of bs! i know the facts!

  3. MCBA .... time for a new release about your entire membership (or is it just the alter ego) being "saddened and disappointed" in the failure to lynch a police officer protecting himself in the line of duty. But this time against Eric Holder and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: "WASHINGTON — Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/us/justice-department-ferguson-civil-rights-darren-wilson.html?ref=us&_r=0

  4. Dr wail asfour lives 3 hours from the hospital,where if he gets an emergency at least he needs three hours,while even if he is on call he should be in a location where it gives him max 10 minutes to be beside the patient,they get paid double on their on call days ,where look how they handle it,so if the death of the patient occurs on weekend and these doctors still repeat same pattern such issue should be raised,they should be closer to the patient.on other hand if all the death occured on the absence of the Dr and the nurses handle it,the nurses should get trained how to function appearntly they not that good,if the Dr lives 3 hours far from the hospital on his call days he should sleep in the hospital

  5. It's a capital offense...one for you Latin scholars..

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