ILNews

Court officials chosen for juvenile justice program

Michael W. Hoskins
January 1, 2008
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Indiana's largest county has been chosen to join six other states in a series of leadership-development workshops to study juvenile justice reform nationally.

On May 13, the non-profit Annie E. Casey Foundation selected Marion Superior Juvenile Magistrate Gary Chavers and Chief Juvenile Probation Officer Chris Ball to participate in the program because of their work recently on juvenile detention alternatives. For the past two years, the county has been Indiana's only site participating in the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiatives (JDAI), which has helped reduce the Marion County Juvenile Detention Center's population and enable more efficiency in the local system.

Both Ball and Magistrate Chavers - who serve under Marion Superior Juvenile Judge Marilyn Moores - co-chair the local JDAI Steering Committee, which is designed to reduce incarceration rates for all juveniles and address disproportionate detainment of minorities. The two applied for the inaugural series called the Applied Leadership Network after being recommended by Judge Frank Orlando, an internationally recognized consultant for juvenile justice reforms who served on the bench in Florida and helped establish JDAI more than a decade ago.

Judge Orlando suggested them because of an Initial Hearing Court developed to determine if court involvement is necessary, the creation of an off-site reception center that addresses low-level juvenile criminal and status offenses, and a risk-assessment instrument similar to an adult bail matrix that evaluates the need for juvenile detention through a scoring system.

Other participants include juvenile justice officials from Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, Oregon, Texas, and Virginia.

Read more about Marion County juvenile justice reforms, and those happening statewide, in the May 14-27, 2008, edition of Indiana Lawyer or at www.theindianalawyer.com.
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  1. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  2. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  3. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  4. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

  5. Can I get this form on line,if not where can I obtain one. I am eligible.

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