Aaron L. Anderson, III v. State of Indiana - 11/7/13

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Thursday  November 7, 2013 
9:00 AM  EST

9 a.m. 29A02-1208-CR-694. When a police officer initiated a traffic stop, Anderson opened the door and ran. He was found hiding in a backyard shed. A woman standing on her back deck, had seen Anderson run by and heard a “thump, thump, thump.” Anderson told police he had thrown out a bag of marijuana; jail officials found marijuana on him when he was searched at the jail. Approximately an hour later, the woman saw a firearm in a pile of snow on her deck. Following a jury trial, Anderson was convicted of unlawful possession of a firearm by a serious violent felon, a Class B felony, and other offenses. The Court of Appeals affirmed in Anderson v. State, No. 29A02-1208-CR-694 (Ind. Ct. App. Apr. 4, 2013) (NFP mem. dec.), trans. pending. Anderson has petitioned the Supreme Court to accept jurisdiction over the appeal on grounds the evidence is insufficient to sustain the conviction.

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  1. Contact Lea Shelemey attorney in porter county Indiana. She just helped us win our case...she is awesome...

  2. We won!!!! It was a long expensive battle but we did it. I just wanted people to know it is possible. And if someone can point me I. The right direction to help change the way the courts look as grandparents as only grandparents. The courts assume the parent does what is in the best interest of the child...and the court is wrong. A lot of the time it is spite and vindictiveness that separates grandparents and grandchildren. It should not have been this long and hard and expensive...Something needs to change...

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