ILNews

Criminal tax evasion offers legal option in targeting dog, puppy mills

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Hundreds of dogs and puppies kept in squalid cages and neglected to the point of being diseased were seized in two separate criminal raids, putting those animals in the hands of rescue workers who could best care for the animals.

The dogs were transported to 10 different shelters statewide and outside Indiana, and more than $10,000 worth of volunteer time and service came to the state for free in addition to court judgments of more than $100,000 against each breeder or seller.

Puppy Mill The Indiana Attorney General’s office used a tax evasion law to stop operators of puppy mills from which hundreds of neglected dogs were rescued. (Submitted photo)

It wasn’t the animal neglect that did in those breeders or sellers, but a little-used provision in state statute that the Indiana Attorney General’s Office refers to as the “Al Capone approach.”

Using the same type of criminal sales tax evasion enforcement law that did in the Chicago crime boss in the 1930s, the Indiana AG’s Office used that legal option to take down dog and puppy mill operators in the past few years, as well as an illegal stereo-selling racket where the person didn’t comply with the tax law.

That tax law has held more of a bite than what state statute historically provided and led to a new law in July 2009 that put more strength behind local prosecutors and state regulators who can now more diligently pursue these types of illegal animal activity.

“This was never about puppies per se, it’s been about tax cheats,” said attorney Andrew Swain in the AG’s tax division. “From a tax law point of view, there’s no distinction between these cases because they were all failing to collect and report taxes. This law had been on the books, but I’d never used it and was just waiting for the right taxpayer (or non-taxpayer) to come along and test it, to see if we could get a bad operator with it.”

That chance arose in late 2008, when under former Attorney General Steve Carter the state agency filed an action against Tammy Gilchrist in Cloverdale who was operating a puppy mill but not paying taxes as required, Swain said. This was the first time the tax evasion law was used against this type of activity, he said, and it paid off. Authorities seized 74 dogs and puppies and also four horses in that case, and in early 2009 the state obtained a guilty plea against Gilchrist on two felony counts of failing to collect taxes and permit examination of tax records. She received two years suspended; 40 hours of community service with the county’s animal welfare league, and was prohibited from having direct contact with animals.

Andrew Swain mug Swain

Another case came in June 2009 against an operation in Harrison County, culminating in guilty pleas last month. Virginia Garwood, 64, and her daughter Kristen Garwood, 27, pleaded guilty to a Class D felony of failure to remit or collect sales tax in connection with their cash-and-carry dog-breeding operation in Mauckport that had been ongoing since 2004. The mother also pleaded guilty to a separate felony count of income tax evasion, while the daughter’s felony was reduced to a misdemeanor.

The AG’s Office charged the two following a raid of their operation during which police and animal-rescue workers seized 244 dogs and puppies that were confined in squalid cages and enclosures and tested positive for disease.

Marion Superior Judge Annie Christ-Garcia accepted the plea agreements and ordered an 18-month and one-year suspended sentence for the mother and daughter respectively, in addition to prohibiting them from breeding or selling dogs while on probation or working in any business not complying with state sales tax laws. Each also had to pay court and probation costs.

Those penalties came on top of a civil tax case seeking $132,440 in unpaid taxes on several of the dog-sale transactions and a consumer-protection lawsuit filed against them in November under the Deceptive Consumer Sales Act because four consumers complained the dogs weren’t healthy as advertised.

Those tax evasion legal options were the only way to go after these operators, according to Swain and animal advocates who lobbied for the new 2009 law. Under the Indiana tax law, the AG’s office assumes a non-traditional role in being able to go after delinquent taxpayers with criminal actions. Swain said that allows the state to essentially seize bank accounts and take any inventory and sell it to apply to the amount owed in taxes.

“This wasn’t common in Indiana, but it can be used as a deterrent factor to enhance civil collections by sending a message to taxpayers that states are going to aggressively pursue this, now more than ever,” Swain said. “Very few tax crimes in Indiana are felonies, but this is and we’re using it in the way it’s intended. Some might think this is akin to public urination, but this is all theft and could be charged that way.”

Linda Lawson mug Lawson

Nationally, states such as New Mexico and New York have had more aggressive tax crime divisions than what Indiana and others have had in going after a problem that results in $2.5 trillion annually in non-reported income, Swain said. He heard about this topic and how it is used when attending national tax administration seminars, he said.

When teaching seminars, Swain said he refers to these cases as being subjects of what he calls the “Al Capone approach.”

“If you allow businesses to get away with this, you’re giving them a competitive advantage and that undermines the law. It undermines legit people trying to play by the rules and creates an uneven playing field,” Swain said.

Litigation spokesman Bryan Corbin for the AG’s Office said the goal of the Garwood and Gilchrist cases was never about them going to prison, it was about making sure they pay the taxes they owe. While animal-cruelty laws have historically been weak in Indiana, the state wouldn’t have targeted these operators if they had been paying their taxes as required by law, Corbin said.

“We’re not the puppy police, and this is not an animal-rights case; it’s a tax case,” he said. “This may be novel from a legal standpoint, but we almost never have the authority to do something like this.”

In addition to the tax crime aspect of what’s happened, the additional animal-cruelty benefit is what many have taken out of these actions in recent years. Animal advocates say the AG’s Office has helped put a stronger law in place, one that’s been long overdue.

Rep. Linda Lawson, D-Hammond, who is also a Humane Society volunteer, championed the law change during the General Assembly last year.

The new law requires commercial dog-breeding operations to register with the state, and it authorizes the AG to take civil actions against those who fail to register. It also requires that caged dogs be allowed out to exercise, increases the penalties for animal cruelty, and gives local prosecutors more ability to pursue those cases.

Until the change, the state’s only requirement for animal owners was that they provided food and water; it didn’t require that animals have shelter or medical care. That meant that when a pit bull in Gary was found chained and frozen to death, the only reason the owner could be prosecuted was if the dog didn’t have food and water.

“Prior to July last year in Indiana, you had more regulation if you owned a barber shop than you did if you had 700 dogs on your property,” said Anne Sterling, Indiana state director for the Humane Society of the United States. “For puppy mills, it’s been extremely difficult to address the most basic needs of the animals, and we desperately needed to strengthen the cruelty code.”•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. OK, take notice. Those wondering just how corrupt the Indiana system is can see the picture in this post. Attorney Donald James did not criticize any judges, he merely, it would seem, caused some clients to file against him and then ignored his own defense. James thus disrespected the system via ignoring all and was also ordered to reimburse the commission $525.88 for the costs of prosecuting the first case against him. Yes, nearly $526 for all the costs, the state having proved it all. Ouch, right? Now consider whistleblower and constitutionalist and citizen journalist Paul Ogden who criticized a judge, defended himself in such a professional fashion as to have half the case against him thrown out by the ISC and was then handed a career ending $10,000 bill as "half the costs" of the state crucifying him. http://www.theindianalawyer.com/ogden-quitting-law-citing-high-disciplinary-fine/PARAMS/article/35323 THE TAKEAWAY MESSAGE for any who have ears to hear ... resist Star Chamber and pay with your career ... welcome to the Indiana system of (cough) justice.

  2. GMA Ranger, I, too, was warned against posting on how the Ind govt was attempting to destroy me professionally, and visit great costs and even destitution upon my family through their processing. No doubt the discussion in Indy today is likely how to ban me from this site (I expect I soon will be), just as they have banned me from emailing them at the BLE and Office of Bar Admission and ADA coordinator -- or, if that fails, whether they can file a complaint against my Kansas or SCOTUS law license for telling just how they operate and offering all of my files over the past decade to any of good will. The elitist insiders running the Hoosier social control mechanisms realize that knowledge and a unified response will be the end of their unjust reign. They fear exposure and accountability. I was banned for life from the Indiana bar for questioning government processing, that is, for being a whistleblower. Hoosier whistleblowers suffer much. I have no doubt, Gma Ranger, of what you report. They fear us, but realize as long as they keep us in fear of them, they can control us. Kinda like the kids' show Ants. Tyrannical governments the world over are being shaken by empowered citizens. Hoosiers dealing with The Capitol are often dealing with tyranny. Time to rise up: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/jan/17/governments-struggling-to-retain-trust-of-citizens-global-survey-finds Back to the Founders! MAGA!

  3. Science is showing us the root of addiction is the lack of connection (with people). Criminalizing people who are lonely is a gross misinterpretation of what data is revealing and the approach we must take to combat mental health. Harsher crimes from drug dealers? where there is a demand there is a market, so make it legal and encourage these citizens to be functioning members of a society with competitive market opportunities. Legalize are "drugs" and quit wasting tax payer dollars on frivolous incarceration. The system is destroying lives and doing it in the name of privatized profits. To demonize loneliness and destroy lives in the land of opportunity is not freedom.

  4. Good luck, but as I have documented in three Hail Mary's to the SCOTUS, two applications (2007 & 2013),a civil rights suit and my own kicked-to-the-curb prayer for mandamus. all supported in detailed affidavits with full legal briefing (never considered), the ISC knows that the BLE operates "above the law" (i.e. unconstitutionally) and does not give a damn. In fact, that is how it was designed to control the lawyers. IU Law Prof. Patrick Baude blew the whistle while he was Ind Bar Examiner President back in 1993, even he was shut down. It is a masonic system that blackballs those whom the elite disdain. Here is the basic thrust:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackballing When I asked why I was initially denied, the court's foremost jester wrote back that the ten examiners all voted, and I did not gain the needed votes for approval (whatever that is, probably ten) and thus I was not in .. nothing written, no explanation, just go away or appeal ... and if you appeal and disagree with their system .. proof positive you lack character and fitness. It is both arbitrary and capricious by its very design. The Hoosier legal elites are monarchical minded, and rejected me for life for ostensibly failing to sufficiently respect man's law (due to my stated regard for God's law -- which they questioned me on, after remanding me for a psych eval for holding such Higher Law beliefs) while breaking their own rules, breaking federal statutory law, and violating federal and state constitutions and ancient due process standards .. all well documented as they "processed me" over many years.... yes years ... they have few standards that they will not bulldoze to get to the end desired. And the ISC knows this, and they keep it in play. So sad, And the fed courts refuse to do anything, and so the blackballing show goes on ... it is the Indy way. My final experience here: https://www.scribd.com/document/299040062/Brown-ind-Bar-memo-Pet-cert I will open my files to anyone interested in seeing justice dawn over Indy. My cases are an open book, just ask.

  5. Looks like 2017 will be another notable year for these cases. I have a Grandson involved in a CHINS case that should never have been. He and the whole family are being held hostage by CPS and the 'current mood' of the CPS caseworker. If the parents disagree with a decision, they are penalized. I, along with other were posting on Jasper County Online News, but all were quickly warned to remove posts. I totally understand that some children need these services, but in this case, it was mistakes, covered by coorcement of father to sign papers, lies and cover-ups. The most astonishing thing was within 2 weeks of this child being placed with CPS, a private adoption agency was asking questions regarding child's family in the area. I believe a photo that was taken by CPS manager at the very onset during the CHINS co-ocerment and the intent was to make money. I have even been warned not to post or speak to anyone regarding this case. Parents have completed all requirements, met foster parents, get visitation 2 days a week, and still the next court date is all the way out till May 1, which gives them(CPS) plenty of to time make further demands (which I expect) No trust of these 'seasoned' case managers, as I have already learned too much about their dirty little tricks. If they discover that I have posted here, I expect they will not be happy and penalized parents again. Still a Hostage.

ADVERTISEMENT