ILNews

Dean's Desk: IU Maurer alumni, students exemplify hard work, integrity

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

deans-desk-parrishThis is my first Dean’s Desk column for the Indiana Lawyer, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to contribute. This past week, I had the privilege of welcoming four of our graduates into our Academy of Law Alumni Fellows – one of the highlight events of the deanship since I joined the law school in January. I was sufficiently moved by the ceremony that I thought I’d write about it in my first column.

Induction into the Academy is special. The award is the highest honor the Indiana University Maurer School of Law can bestow upon its alumni. It consists of an elite group that includes U.S. senators, federal judges, successful business leaders and distinguished practitioners. This year, we honored an entrepreneur and conservationist (Lowell Baier ’64); an international lawyer and business executive (Sara Yang Bosco ’83); a veteran and criminal defense attorney (Don Dorfman ’57); and a longtime Indiana practitioner and judge (Patricia McNagny ’51). All four of them grew up in Indiana, and yet their impact has gone well beyond the state’s borders. When giving remarks during the induction, each of them had uplifting messages about how they used their education to make a difference in the world.

Our inductees’ positive messages stood in stark contrast to the relentless negativity we hear about law school in the national media. Not only is the economy tough, we are told, but things have fundamentally and permanently changed. Good jobs are now much harder to find, and the path to professional success is no longer guaranteed. You should only go to law school if you can assure yourself of immediate large financial rewards, often tied to working only in the largest Wall Street firms. Law school, it seems, is for chumps.

What bothers me is not that the national media or the law blogs – our own Perez Hilton wannabes – are so down on law school. They are paid to peddle overwrought sensationalism. It’s that so many of us seem to buy into it and discourage the next generation’s best and brightest from pursuing higher education. As we oversell how things have radically changed, we downplay our own accomplishments and hard-fought achievements. We also feed the very worst caricature of the current generation – that they are all spoiled rotten, self-absorbed narcissists who are consumed with an intense sense of entitlement. We capitulate to the myopic idea that a legal education is not worth it unless we can see immediate results.

What’s troubling is that so little of it is true. The economy has been bad for sure, and new lawyers face stiffer challenges in the job market than before the recession. The rising cost of education is also a serious issue. But professional success was never guaranteed. Not one of our Academy fellows had life handed to them on silver platters, expected immediate rewards or saw their careers as one of entitlement. Their achievements were their own, won through grit, hard work and deep integrity. Pretending differently is insulting to their legacies.

And it’s not just these four. Since I joined the law school in January, I’ve met with more than 400 alumni, many of them practicing or sitting on the bench in cities and towns throughout the state. And not one has told me that they thought it would be easy or that they wouldn’t have to pay their dues. They went to law school motivated not by avarice, but by the intellectual challenge and for wanting to make more of themselves, to better provide for their families, and often because of a heartfelt desire to contribute to society. I’ve met many alums who had to hold down multiple jobs to make ends meet, who hustled for their first cases, and who lived leanly in their early years. Those who found financial success did so based on their own merit.

As a result of this hard-work ethic, our graduates have left their mark. The Maurer School of Law, as the state’s flagship law school and one of the oldest law schools in the nation, has been the place where public officials, diplomats, leading lawyers, entrepreneurs, and the top business people have cut their teeth. Our alumni include giants like U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sherman Minton, U.S. Rep. Lee Hamilton and U.S. Sen. Birch Bayh. Our graduates are trailblazers, and they certainly didn’t have it easy – consider the first elected female African-American trial judge in the country and the first to serve on the supreme court of any state (Juanita Kidd Stout); the first woman on the Wisconsin Supreme Court and its current chief justice (Shirley Abrahamson); the first Japanese-American admitted to the bar in the United States (Masuji Miyakawa); and influential Latino practitioners and federal District Court judges (José Villarreal and Gonzalo Curiel, respectively), to name just a few.

It’s worth underscoring that this legacy of alumni excellence isn’t one of a distant past, although we know we stand on their shoulders – well-known graduates like Hoagy Carmichael, Wendell Willkie, William Jenner or George Craig. Our alumni ranks are filled with the most important leaders in business, law and public service of the day. In Indiana alone, the Maurer School of Law can proudly claim more than 100 federal or state judges; more than 80 corporate executives, including CEOs, presidents, CFOs, COOs and executive directors; 81 general counsels; 88 deputy and assistant prosecutors; 21 county bar association presidents; eight public defenders; five assistant U.S. attorneys; and a justice on the Indiana Supreme Court. Indeed, more of our graduates have served in the past half century on the Indiana Supreme Court than graduates from any other law school in the nation. And this is just Indiana. Many of our graduates do not stay in the state, with a large number practicing in Chicago; New York; Washington, D.C.; Los Angeles and elsewhere. Also, don’t be misled to thinking a law degree is only for those wanting to practice law. Over the last five years, less than half of our graduates have chosen to pursue traditional law-firm employment.

This generation of law students is also not as entitled or as naïve as the simple stereotype suggests. Maybe it’s different in other states. But the law students I know aren’t lazy and entitled; they are inspiring, entrepreneurial and resourceful, and they understand the key role they will play in the globalized world of tomorrow. Students now at the Maurer School of Law – like their predecessors – will go on to do great things. Students such as Mahja Zeon, who will work at the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office, but who also does tremendous human rights work with our Center for Constitutional Democracy and the Liberian Law Reform Commission. It includes Christina Abossedgh, a third-year student on the executive board of the Business Law Society, who spent her last summer in New Delhi, India, working at one of the more prestigious law firms in that region as part of the school’s innovative Stewart Fellows program. The value of the J.D. degree is underscored by students such as David Frazee, Alaina Hobbs and Jonathon Hitz who are competing in the ABA National Moot Court Competition, after placing as finalists in the regional competition in Seattle. And students like Sedric Collins, who is the president of the school’s Black Law Student Association that won the regional chapter award for the third year running. It includes the dozens of students who participate in our clinics and volunteer for hundreds of hours of pro bono service, each day helping people in Indiana live better lives. I’d put our students up against any graduate over the past 50 years – their lawyering skills are exceptional.

The future is in good hands: Our current students have the same mettle as those we honored at our awards induction. They come to the profession not with a sense of entitlement, but as hard workers, willing to roll up their sleeves to get the job done. They know that the road to a satisfying career can be tough. But they also know that for those who are willing to dig in, work hard and build connections, the investment in a legal education can reap enormous personal and professional rewards. The transformative value of higher education remains. It’s the certainty of their future achievements, like the achievements of the four alumni we celebrated recently, that makes me feel proud and privileged to be dean of this great law school.•

__________

Austen L. Parrish is dean and James H. Rudy Professor of Law at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law. Opinions expressed are the author’s.
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. The is an unsigned editorial masquerading as a news story. Almost everyone quoted was biased in favor of letting all illegal immigrants remain in the U.S. (Ignoring that Obama deported 3.5 million in 8 years). For some reason Obama enforcing part of the immigration laws was O.K. but Trump enforcing additional parts is terrible. I have listed to press conferences and explanations of the Homeland Security memos and I gather from them that less than 1 million will be targeted for deportation, the "dreamers" will be left alone and illegals arriving in the last two years -- especially those arriving very recently -- will be subject to deportation but after the criminals. This will not substantially affect the GDP negatively, especially as it will take place over a number of years. I personally think this is a rational approach to the illegal immigration problem. It may cause Congress to finally pass new immigration laws rationalizing the whole immigration situation.

  2. Mr. Straw, I hope you prevail in the fight. Please show us fellow American's that there is a way to fight the corrupted justice system and make them an example that you and others will not be treated unfairly. I hope you the best and good luck....

  3. @ President Snow - Nah, why try to fix something that ain't broken??? You do make an excellent point. I am sure some Mickey or Minnie Mouse will take Ruckers seat, I wonder how his retirement planning is coming along???

  4. Can someone please explain why Judge Barnes, Judge Mathias and Chief Judge Vaidik thought it was OK to re weigh the evidence blatantly knowing that by doing so was against the rules and went ahead and voted in favor of the father? I would love to ask them WHY??? I would also like to ask the three Supreme Justices why they thought it was OK too.

  5. How nice, on the day of my car accident on the way to work at the Indiana Supreme Court. Unlike the others, I did not steal any money or do ANYTHING unethical whatsoever. I am suing the Indiana Supreme Court and appealed the failure of the district court in SDIN to protect me. I am suing the federal judge because she failed to protect me and her abandonment of jurisdiction leaves her open to lawsuits because she stripped herself of immunity. I am a candidate for Indiana Supreme Court justice, and they imposed just enough sanction so that I am made ineligible. I am asking the 7th Circuit to remove all of them and appoint me as the new Chief Justice of Indiana. That's what they get for dishonoring my sacrifice and and violating the ADA in about 50 different ways.

ADVERTISEMENT