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Disciplinary Actions -1/30/13

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Indiana Lawyer Disciplinary Actions

The Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission brings charges against attorneys who have violated the state’s rules for admission to the bar and Rules of Professional Conduct. The Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications brings charges against judges, judicial officers, or judicial candidates for misconduct. Details of attorneys’ and judges’ actions for which they are being disciplined by the Supreme Court will be included unless they are not a matter of public record under the court’s rules.

Reciprocal discipline
Mark J. Hughes has been suspended indefinitely from the practice of law in Indiana, as of Jan. 8, per a Supreme Court order. Hughes, who is also admitted to practice in Arizona, was disbarred from practice in Arizona in May 2012. If Hughes is reinstated in Arizona, he may file for reinstatement in Indiana, provided there is no other suspension order in effect.

Suspension
William E. Dittrich, of Porter County, has received a 90-day suspension with automatic reinstatement from the Supreme Court, per a Jan. 10 order. Dittrich admitted to four counts of misconduct occurring from 2008 to 2010, including failing to do the work he was hired to do and failing to safeguard unearned fees by placing them in a trust account. He knew he was suffering from depression and other health-related issues that interfered with his ability to attend to his clients’ needs.

After the verified complaint was filed, Dittrich made full refunds of unearned fees. He has violated Indiana Professional Conduct Rules 1.3: Failure to act with reasonable diligence and promptness; 1.4(a)(3): Failure to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter; 1.4(a)(4): Failure to comply promptly with a client’s reasonable requests for information; 1.15(a): Failure to safeguard property of a client; 1.16(a)(2): Failure to withdraw from representation when the lawyer’s physical or mental condition materially impairs the lawyer’s ability to represent the client; 1.16(d): Failure to refund an unearned fee promptly upon termination of representation; and 3.2: Failure to expedite litigation consistent with the interests of a client.

The costs of the proceeding are processed against Dittrich. His suspension begins Feb. 15.

Diamond Z. Hirschauer, of Marion County, has been suspended indefinitely per a Jan. 10 Supreme Court order because more than six months have passed since Hirschauer was suspended due to noncooperation with the disciplinary process. The conversion to the indefinite suspension was effective the date of the order. To be readmitted to practice, Hirschauer must cure the causes of all suspensions in effect and successfully petition the Supreme Court for reinstatement.

Thomas N. Nuttle, of Elkhart County, has been suspended indefinitely per a Jan. 10 Supreme Cout order because more than six months have passed since he was suspended due to noncooperation with the disciplinary process. The conversion to the indefinite suspension was effective the date of the order. To be readmitted to practice, Nuttle must cure the causes of all suspensions in effect and successfully petition the Supreme Court for reinstatement.

Jon A. Criss, of St. Joseph County, has been suspended pendente lite from the practice of law, effective Jan. 10, per a Supreme Court order. Criss was found guilty of Class D felonies possession of methamphetamine and maintaining a common nuisance. The interim suspension shall continue until further order of the court or final resolution of any resulting disciplinary action, provided no other suspension is in effect.

Marla E. Muse, of Marion County, has been suspended for 180 days, with 30 days served and the remainder stayed subject to at least two years of probation, per a Jan. 11 Supreme Court order. Muse pleaded guilty in April 2012 to Class D felony possession of marijuana. She agreed with the Disciplinary Commission that she violated Indiana Professional Conduct Rule 8.4(b), which prohibits committing a criminal act that reflects adversely on trustworthiness or fitness as a lawyer.

She has entered into a voluntary monitoring agreement with the Judges and Lawyers Assistance Program. Muse’s suspension begins Feb. 15, and the costs of the proceeding are assessed against her.

Resignation
Olubunmi O. Okanlami, of St. Joseph County, has resigned from the bar, effective Jan. 10. Any disciplinary proceedings pending against Okanlami have been dismissed as moot. She is not eligible to petition for reinstatement to practice for five years. The costs of the proceeding are accessed against Okanlami.

Leonard M. Holajter, of Lake County, has resigned from the bar, effective Jan. 14. Any disciplinary proceedings pending against him are dismissed as moot. The costs of the proceeding are accessed against Holajter, and he is ineligible to petition for reinstatement for five years.•

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  1. Well, maybe it's because they are unelected, and, they have a tendency to strike down laws by elected officials from all over the country. When you have been taught that "Democracy" is something almost sacred, then, you will have a tendency to frown on such imperious conduct. Lawyers get acculturated in law school into thinking that this is the very essence of high minded government, but to people who are more heavily than King George ever did, they may not like it. Thanks for the information.

  2. I pd for a bankruptcy years ago with Mr Stiles and just this week received a garnishment from my pay! He never filed it even though he told me he would! Don't let this guy practice law ever again!!!

  3. Excellent initiative on the part of the AG. Thankfully someone takes action against predators taking advantage of people who have already been through the wringer. Well done!

  4. Conour will never turn these funds over to his defrauded clients. He tearfully told the court, and his daughters dutifully pledged in interviews, that his first priority is to repay every dime of the money he stole from his clients. Judge Young bought it, much to the chagrin of Conour’s victims. Why would Conour need the $2,262 anyway? Taxpayers are now supporting him, paying for his housing, utilities, food, healthcare, and clothing. If Conour puts the money anywhere but in the restitution fund, he’s proved, once again, what a con artist he continues to be and that he has never had any intention of repaying his clients. Judge Young will be proven wrong... again; Conour has no remorse and the Judge is one of the many conned.

  5. Pass Legislation to require guilty defendants to pay for the costs of lab work, etc as part of court costs...

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