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Donations show team pride, help veterans

Jennifer Nelson
February 4, 2010
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An Indianapolis attorney and Army reserve major wants Colts fans to put their money where their mouths are to show support for the team and raise money for wounded soldiers.

Attorney and Army Reserve Major David Seiter wants to spread the word about the Wounded Warrior Project, which helps injured soldiers and their families and caregivers cope with the dramatic changes injuries can bring. He contacted the National Football League about his idea and got all the legal licenses in place. Now, the NFL, Wounded Warrior Project, and Operation Touchdown 2010 have partnered to encourage Colts and New Orleans Saints fans to see who can donate the most money to the Wounded Warrior Project.

Seiter and Saints fan Army Col. Ted Cox, now retired, started Operation Touchdown while serving in Iraq in 2003. They realized their favorite NFL teams would be playing each other that year and organized a daylong clinic for Iraqi children to teach them about American football. Fans from Indianapolis and New Orleans donated child-size Colts and Saints apparel and the two realized they now had a platform where they could bring attention to different charities, Seiter said.

Operation Touchdown has organized other events that coincide with the Colts and Saints facing each other. When it looked like the two teams would play in the Super Bowl in 2007, Seiter and Cox organized a benefit for the USO. Unfortunately for Cox, the Chicago Bears beat the Saints and went to the Super Bowl.

Seiter said he's always been impressed with Colts fans' support of their team and the military. People can make donations on the Wounded Warrior Project's Web site for up to a week after the Super Bowl. He said the Web site will begin showing the results soon. They hope to raise thousands of dollars for Wounded Warrior Project.

"I certainly don't want to get beat by a bunch of Saints fans," he said. "This is a competition. I want to see our fans support this program."

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  1. Linda, I sure hope you are not seeking a law license, for such eighteenth century sentiments could result in your denial in some jurisdictions minting attorneys for our tolerant and inclusive profession.

  2. Mazel Tov to the newlyweds. And to those bakers, photographers, printers, clerks, judges and others who will lose careers and social standing for not saluting the New World (Dis)Order, we can all direct our Two Minutes of Hate as Big Brother asks of us. Progress! Onward!

  3. My daughter was taken from my home at the end of June/2014. I said I would sign the safety plan but my husband would not. My husband said he would leave the house so my daughter could stay with me but the case worker said no her mind is made up she is taking my daughter. My daughter went to a friends and then the friend filed a restraining order which she was told by dcs if she did not then they would take my daughter away from her. The restraining order was not in effect until we were to go to court. Eventually it was dropped but for 2 months DCS refused to allow me to have any contact and was using the restraining order as the reason but it was not in effect. This was Dcs violating my rights. Please help me I don't have the money for an attorney. Can anyone take this case Pro Bono?

  4. If justice is not found in a court room, it's time to clean house!!! Even judges are accountable to a higher Judge!!!

  5. The small claims system, based on my recent and current usage of it, is not exactly a shining example of justice prevailing. The system appears slow and clunky and people involved seem uninterested in actually serving justice within a reasonable time frame. Any improvement in accountability and performance would gain a vote from me. Speaking of voting, what do the people know about judges and justice from the bench perspective. I think they have a tendency to "vote" for judges based on party affiliation or name coolness factor (like Stoner, for example!). I don't know what to do in my current situation other than grin and bear it, but my case is an example of things working neither smoothly, effectively nor expeditiously. After this experience I'd pay more to have the higher courts hear the case -- if I had the money. Oh the conundrum.

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