ILNews

Donations show team pride, help veterans

Jennifer Nelson
February 4, 2010
Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

An Indianapolis attorney and Army reserve major wants Colts fans to put their money where their mouths are to show support for the team and raise money for wounded soldiers.

Attorney and Army Reserve Major David Seiter wants to spread the word about the Wounded Warrior Project, which helps injured soldiers and their families and caregivers cope with the dramatic changes injuries can bring. He contacted the National Football League about his idea and got all the legal licenses in place. Now, the NFL, Wounded Warrior Project, and Operation Touchdown 2010 have partnered to encourage Colts and New Orleans Saints fans to see who can donate the most money to the Wounded Warrior Project.

Seiter and Saints fan Army Col. Ted Cox, now retired, started Operation Touchdown while serving in Iraq in 2003. They realized their favorite NFL teams would be playing each other that year and organized a daylong clinic for Iraqi children to teach them about American football. Fans from Indianapolis and New Orleans donated child-size Colts and Saints apparel and the two realized they now had a platform where they could bring attention to different charities, Seiter said.

Operation Touchdown has organized other events that coincide with the Colts and Saints facing each other. When it looked like the two teams would play in the Super Bowl in 2007, Seiter and Cox organized a benefit for the USO. Unfortunately for Cox, the Chicago Bears beat the Saints and went to the Super Bowl.

Seiter said he's always been impressed with Colts fans' support of their team and the military. People can make donations on the Wounded Warrior Project's Web site for up to a week after the Super Bowl. He said the Web site will begin showing the results soon. They hope to raise thousands of dollars for Wounded Warrior Project.

"I certainly don't want to get beat by a bunch of Saints fans," he said. "This is a competition. I want to see our fans support this program."

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Don't we have bigger issues to concern ourselves with?

  2. Anyone who takes the time to study disciplinary and bar admission cases in Indiana ... much of which is, as a matter of course and by intent, off the record, would have a very difficult time drawing lines that did not take into account things which are not supposed to matter, such as affiliations, associations, associates and the like. Justice Hoosier style is a far departure than what issues in most other parts of North America. (More like Central America, in fact.) See, e.g., http://www.theindianalawyer.com/indiana-attorney-illegally-practicing-in-florida-suspended-for-18-months/PARAMS/article/42200 When while the Indiana court system end the cruel practice of killing prophets of due process and those advocating for blind justice?

  3. Wouldn't this call for an investigation of Government corruption? Chief Justice Loretta Rush, wrote that the case warranted the high court’s review because the method the Indiana Court of Appeals used to reach its decision was “a significant departure from the law.” Specifically, David wrote that the appellate panel ruled after reweighing of the evidence, which is NOT permissible at the appellate level. **But yet, they look the other way while an innocent child was taken by a loving mother who did nothing wrong"

  4. Different rules for different folks....

  5. I would strongly suggest anyone seeking mediation check the experience of the mediator. There are retired judges who decide to become mediators. Their training and experience is in making rulings which is not the point of mediation.

ADVERTISEMENT