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DTCI: Protection of drug and alcohol treatment records

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dtci-drenth-marianLawyers representing plaintiffs and defendants in civil tort actions will eventually be challenged with protecting their client’s alcohol and drug treatment records from disclosure. In most cases, a person’s alcohol and drug treatment records are considered confidential and non-discoverable. The Public Health Service Act, 42 U.S.C. § 290dd-2(a) (Westlaw 2011), bars access to an individual’s alcohol and drug treatment records and relieves a party to litigation from answering questions regarding such treatment.

dtci-schumann-dane Congress passed the PHSA to provide addicts an incentive to seek treatment by eliminating the threat of an adverse party’s use of their efforts to obtain treatment against them. The act’s penalties provision for violations clearly illustrates Congress’ intent to vigorously protect substance abuse treatment records. Carr v. Allegheny Health, Education and Research Foundation, 933 F. Supp. 485(W.D. Penn. 1996).

The PHSA provides that patient records pertaining to substance abuse treatment are confidential and not discoverable, subject to limited exceptions. Confidentiality applies if the records sought to be disclosed were obtained from a program “which is conducted, regulated, or directly or indirectly assisted by any department or agency of the United States.” 42 U.S.C. § 290dd-2(a) (Westlaw 2011).

The PHSA’s regulations dictate that this privilege extends to any information about alcohol and drug abuse that patients obtained by a “federally assisted” program. Coverage includes, but is not limited to, those treatment or rehabilitation programs, employee assistance programs, programs within general hospitals, school-based programs, and private practitioners who hold themselves out as providing – and do provide – alcohol or drug abuse diagnosis, treatment or referral for treatment. However, these regulations do not apply, for example, to emergency room personnel referring a patient to the intensive care unit for an apparent overdose. The privilege still applies if the provider is making the referral to obtain a substance abuse diagnosis, treatment or referral and they are identified as providing such services.

Substance abuse treatment records are presumed confidential. Therefore, the bar to overcome this presumption is high. Mosier v. American Home Patient, 170 F. Supp. 2d 1211, 1214-15 (N.D. Fla. 2001). In Mosier, a federal court held that there was no good cause where a defendant-employer requested production of a former employee’s treatment records to defend against a wrongful termination suit, despite the court’s acknowledgment that the records were highly relevant and important to the employer’s defense. The defendant-employer presented testimony from a supervisor that he suspected the employee was drunk at work because the employee appeared disheveled, smelled like alcohol, exhibited strange behavior, turned in work late, and the employee was impaired at the end of his tenure. The court found that this evidence was insufficient to support a finding of good cause to release the employee’s prior alcohol treatment records for treatment that was received approximately six years before his employment. Mosier, 170 F. Supp. 2d. at 1214.

What is required to obtain disclosure of alcohol and drug treatment records? 42 C.F.R. § 2.64 delineates the process for disclosure of patient records, requiring that the person seeking disclosure has a legally recognized interest in the records. A subpoena alone is insufficient. A court order is necessary. Further, disclosure may be ordered under 42 C.F.R. § 2.64 only if the court determines that good cause exists. To make this determination, the court must find that (1) other ways of obtaining the information are unavailable or would be ineffective and (2) the public interest and need for the disclosure outweigh the potential injury to the patient, the physician-patient relationship and the treatment services.

If a court orders disclosure of a litigant’s treatment records, restrictions will apply on that disclosure pursuant to 42 C.F.R. § 2.12. Upon granting such an order, the court must determine which portions of the records are necessary to fulfill the objective of the disclosure. In addition, the court must impose appropriate safeguards against unauthorized disclosure, limiting the disclosure to only those persons whose need for the information formed the basis for the order.

This is a brief synopsis of the PHSA, which is an extensive act. Attorneys should familiarize themselves with the sections of the PHSA when faced with discovery seeking the disclosure of an individual’s alcohol and drug treatment records in order to properly enforce the privileges provided by the act.•

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Marian Drenth is a partner at O’Neill McFadden & Willett in Dyer, Ind., and sits on the DTCI board of directors. She concentrates her practice in civil litigation with an emphasis in health care litigation. Her practice also includes employment law and general liability. Dane Schumann is an associate at O’Neill McFadden & Willett. He focuses his practice on health care and general liability. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors.

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  • wrongful disclosure happens often
    I am a long time supporter of the rights of recovering people. I read a letter to the editor in a newspaper, the letter was written by the current judge . It was a letter about his campaign for reelection.He chose to write abou a recent case and his sentencing the defendant ( state vt Man's surname) There had been some ba cklash by his opponent and the smal l town gossip, because thean hadt a long history of substance related crime. The judge wrote in this public letter that he sentenced this man to a n iinpatientsubstance abuse treatment center to help a felon break the cycle of his addiction. He wrote that tjean was doing well in his treatment. This is a small town, and although he identified the manby last name only, the judge knew he identified this man . I was shocled that an Indiana judge would do this. This man is new to recovery, trying to, literally , save his life. This disclosure was made to gain votes. I was also shocked that a newspaper would print this in a paper. Short of the judge riding a horse through town with a bullhorn, I do not know how he could have made a bigger disclosure What can be done in a situation such as this. Is the judge or the newspaper responsible?

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  1. A traditional parade of attorneys? Really Evansville? Y'all need to get out more. When is the traditional parade of notaries? Nurses? Sanitation workers? Pole dancers? I gotta wonder, do throngs of admiring citizens gather to laud these marching servants of the constitution? "Show us your billing records!!!" Hoping some video gets posted. Ours is not a narcissistic profession by any chance, is it? Nah .....

  2. My previous comment not an aside at court. I agree with smith. Good call. Just thought posting here a bit on the if it bleeds it leads side. Most attorneys need to think of last lines of story above.

  3. Hello everyone I'm Gina and I'm here for the exact same thing you are. I have the wonderful joy of waking up every morning to my heart being pulled out and sheer terror of what DCS is going to Throw at me and my family today.Let me start from the !bebeginning.My daughter lost all rights to her 3beautiful children due to Severe mental issues she no longer lives in our state and has cut all ties.DCS led her to belive that once she done signed over her right the babies would be with their family. We have faught screamed begged and anything else we could possibly due I hired a lawyer five grand down the drain.You know all I want is my babies home.I've done everything they have even asked me to do.Now their saying I can't see my grandchildren cause I'M on a prescription for paipain.I have a very rare blood disease it causes cellulitis a form of blood poisoning to stay dormant in my tissues and nervous system it also causes a ,blood clotting disorder.even with the two blood thinners I'm on I still Continue to develop them them also.DCS knows about my illness and still they refuse to let me see my grandchildren. I Love and miss them so much Please can anyone help Us my grandchildren and I they should be worrying about what toy there going to play with but instead there worrying about if there ever coming home again.THANK YOU DCS FOR ALL YOU'VE DONE. ( And if anyone at all has any ideals or knows who can help. Please contact (765)960~5096.only serious callers

  4. He must be a Rethuglican, for if from the other side of the aisle such acts would be merely personal and thus not something that attaches to his professional life. AND ... gotta love this ... oh, and on top of talking dirty on the phone, he also, as an aside, guess we should mention, might be important, not sure, but .... "In addition to these allegations, Keaton was accused of failing to file an appeal after he collected advance payment from a client seeking to challenge a ruling that the client repay benefits because of unreported income." rimshot

  5. I am not a fan of some of the 8.4 discipline we have seen for private conduct-- but this was so egregious and abusive and had so many points of bad conduct relates to the law and the lawyer's status as a lawyer that it is clearly a proper and just disbarment. A truly despicable account of bad acts showing unfit character to practice law. I applaud the outcome.

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