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DTCI: Anchors away! Navigate to the DRI annual meeting

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DTCI-SchultzHave you ever considered what it would be like to stand aboard an aircraft carrier? Have you ever wanted to meet and learn from a Navy Seal who survived on his own behind enemy lines in Afghanistan? Do you like beautiful weather and great restaurants? If your answer is yes to any of these questions, then the DRI Annual Meeting in California Oct. 20-24, 2010, is the place for you.

For the first time ever, the DRI Annual Meeting will be in San Diego. If you have never attended an annual meeting before, this would be a great one to be your first. And if you are a regular attendee, then we certainly look forward to seeing you again at this great event. Not only does the DRI Annual Meeting provide great CLE, but it also provides a number of opportunities for networking, meeting with your clients, and participation in many substantive law committee meetings, not to mention an overall good time with your friends in the defense bar.

It should come as no surprise that at the DTCI Annual Meeting last year in Bloomington, Ind., many of the past presidents of DTCI cited the relationships that they had built over the years with their involvement in DRI as an important part of their legal careers and experience.

This year DRI is blessed with a number of spectacular speakers. At the opening ceremony Oct. 21, Marcus Luttrell, a former U.S. Navy Seal and author of The New York Times best seller “Lone Survivor,” will take us through a story of courage, sacrifice, honor, and patriotism – his battle to survive in the Afghanistan mountains. Thursday’s awards luncheon will include a presentation by Matt Miller, author, radio host, and consultant who is a columnist for The Daily Beast and The Washington Post and a contributing editor at Fortune. On Friday, Soledad O’Brien, anchor and CNN special correspondent, will speak about the importance of mentoring, and on Saturday Mara Liasson, the political correspondent for National Public Radio, will talk about the current political climate and its impact on the legal profession.

In addition to these speakers, you can earn up to 11.5 hours of CLE credit at the annual meeting on subjects including national health-care reform and what it mean to us; the financial crisis, its origins, lawsuits, and coverage issues; social networking for litigation and business development; and discovery issues in the American civil justice system and a call for reform.

If the education and speakers are not enough, DRI has made plans for a number of social activities. On Thursday night, there will be a networking reception aboard the USS Midway Museum, which was the largest ship in the world when christened in 1945 and which served as the Persian Gulf flagship for Operation Desert Storm in 1991. Another networking reception will be Friday, conducted by the Young Lawyer’s Committee. The week’s social activities will be capped off Saturday night at the Presidential Gala and installation ceremony, which will include a DRI silent auction of many fabulous items.

In addition to all these activities, the fun and sun of San Diego itself will be at your doorstep. Nearby beaches, several hiking trails, or trips to Sea World, and the world famous San Diego Zoo are just a few of the wonderful things the city has to offer.

If you have been considering a DRI Annual Meeting for a while and are looking for one to which you can bring your family, this is the year to attend. Register before Sept. 22 and receive $200 off the registration price. For registration and hotel materials log on to www.DRI.org.

I look forward to seeing you there!•

Thomas R. Schultz is a partner in the Indianapolis firm of Schultz & Pogue and is immediate past president of the Defense Trial Counsel of Indiana. He is the current Indiana representative to DRI. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author.

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  1. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  2. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  3. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  4. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  5. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

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