ILNews

DTCI award recipients named

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

During its 2013 Annual Meeting at the Blue Chip Casino in Michigan City Nov. 21-22, the DTCI will recognize the outstanding defense lawyers of 2013. The awards ceremony will be held during the board of directors dinner on November 20.

Defense Lawyers of the Year

dollens-lucy.jpg Dollens

Lucy Dollens, a member in the Indianapolis office of Frost Brown Todd, and Karen Withers, an associate in the Indianapolis firm Zeigler Cohen & Koch, have been named the co-recipients of the 2013 DTCI Defense Lawyer of the Year award. The Defense Lawyer of the Year award is presented to a licensed lawyer who, in the opinion of the Awards Committee, as approved by the board of directors, has promoted the interests of the Indiana Defense Bar, since the last annual meeting of the DTCI, in a most significant way in the fields of litigation, legislation, publication or participation in local, state or national defense organizations.

Dollens, who was nominated by Robert B. Thornburg, was the primary author of the DTCI amicus brief in Santelli v. Rahmatullah, which was recently decided by the Indiana Supreme Court and resulted in a favorable decision for the defense bar.

withers-karen.jpg Withers

Withers, who was nominated by Bobby J. Avery-Seagrave, was responsible for the lion’s share of the work in Plank v. Community, which defended the MMA cap. She conducted all the research and drafting of the briefs throughout the case’s progress through the trial court, Court of Appeals and Indiana Supreme Court.

Diplomats of the Indiana Defense Trial Counsel

The DTCI will also install as Diplomats of the Indiana Defense Trial Counsel two members of the Indiana bar who, in the judgment of the officers and directors of the Defense Trial Counsel of Indiana, have distinguished themselves throughout their careers through outstanding contributions to the representation of clients in the defense of litigation matters. The 2013 recipients are Robert F. Parker, partner in Burke Costanza & Carberry, and John C. Trimble, partner in Lewis Wagner. Both Parker and Trimble were nominated by Thomas R. Schultz.

parker-robert.jpg Parker

Parker is a former president of DTCI, a Defense Lawyer of the Year, and a recipient of DRI’s Exceptional Performance Award. He currently serves on the editorial board of the American College of Trial Lawyers quarterly publication. In the last year he has successfully tried two complex medical malpractice claims and is seen as a leader in that area of law in the state of Indiana. He is also adjunct professor at Valparaiso Law School, where he teaches trial skills.

Trimble is a leading Indiana lawyer handling insurance coverage matters. He has been a leader in working at the state legislature promoting pro-defense positions, including the Wrongful Death Act and tort reform. In addition, he frequently speaks to defense organizations across the country about the way insurance companies evaluate their counsel;

trimble Trimble

he has assisted a number of state and local defense organizations with their long-term strategic plans. He is one of the most recognized people in both DTCI and DRI due to his tireless efforts in helping both organizations. He has led DRI’s Judicial Task Force – looking for ways to maintain a fair and impartial judiciary. A former president of DTCI, he has been DTCI Defense Lawyer of the Year and the DRI National Defense Lawyer of the Year.

Outstanding Young Lawyer

The DTCI Outstanding Young Lawyer award is presented to a member of the Defense Trial Counsel, less than 35 years old, who has shown leadership qualities in service to the Indiana defense bar, the national defense bar, or the community. The 2013 recipient is Crystal Wildeman, who was nominated by Greg J. Freyberger and is an associate with Kahn Dees Donovan & Kahn.

wildeman-crystal.jpg Wildeman

Wildeman graduated from Indiana University with a Bachelor of Science degree in psychology and a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminal justice, then earned her J.D. from DePaul College of Law. Wildeman is licensed to practice law in three states and has been admitted to U.S. District Courts for the Southern District of Indiana, Northern District of Indiana, Eastern District of Kentucky, Western District of Kentucky, Central District of Illinois, and Southern District of Illinois.

She has been recognized as a Rising Star in general personal injury defense by Indiana Super Lawyers magazine. Her impact is felt through her service to Youth First, Inc. as a member of the board of directors, board development committee and executive committee; as chair of the Arc Child Life Center Parent Advisory Board; as a volunteer judge for junior high and high school speech meets; as a Leadership Evansville program alumnus and volunteer; and as a member of Young Professionals Network and A Network of Evansville Women.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. This law is troubling in two respects: First, why wasn't the law reviewed "with the intention of getting all the facts surrounding the legislation and its actual impact on the marketplace" BEFORE it was passed and signed? Seems a bit backwards to me (even acknowledging that this is the Indiana state legislature we're talking about. Second, what is it with the laws in this state that seem to create artificial monopolies in various industries? Besides this one, the other law that comes to mind is the legislation that governed the granting of licenses to firms that wanted to set up craft distilleries. The licensing was limited to only those entities that were already in the craft beer brewing business. Republicans in this state talk a big game when it comes to being "business friendly". They're friendly alright . . . to certain businesses.

  2. Gretchen, Asia, Roberto, Tonia, Shannon, Cheri, Nicholas, Sondra, Carey, Laura ... my heart breaks for you, reaching out in a forum in which you are ignored by a professional suffering through both compassion fatigue and the love of filthy lucre. Most if not all of you seek a warm blooded Hoosier attorney unafraid to take on the government and plead that government officials have acted unconstitutionally to try to save a family and/or rescue children in need and/or press individual rights against the Leviathan state. I know an attorney from Kansas who has taken such cases across the country, arguing before half of the federal courts of appeal and presenting cases to the US S.Ct. numerous times seeking cert. Unfortunately, due to his zeal for the constitutional rights of peasants and willingness to confront powerful government bureaucrats seemingly violating the same ... he was denied character and fitness certification to join the Indiana bar, even after he was cleared to sit for, and passed, both the bar exam and ethics exam. And was even admitted to the Indiana federal bar! NOW KNOW THIS .... you will face headwinds and difficulties in locating a zealously motivated Hoosier attorney to face off against powerful government agents who violate the constitution, for those who do so tend to end up as marginalized as Paul Odgen, who was driven from the profession. So beware, many are mere expensive lapdogs, the kind of breed who will gladly take a large retainer, but then fail to press against the status quo and powers that be when told to heel to. It is a common belief among some in Indiana that those attorneys who truly fight the power and rigorously confront corruption often end up, actually or metaphorically, in real life or at least as to their careers, as dead as the late, great Gary Welch. All of that said, I wish you the very best in finding a Hoosier attorney with a fighting spirit to press your rights as far as you can, for you do have rights against government actors, no matter what said actors may tell you otherwise. Attorneys outside the elitist camp are often better fighters that those owing the powers that be for their salaries, corner offices and end of year bonuses. So do not be afraid to retain a green horn or unconnected lawyer, many of them are fine men and woman who are yet untainted by the "unique" Hoosier system.

  3. I am not the John below. He is a journalist and talk show host who knows me through my years working in Kansas government. I did no ask John to post the note below ...

  4. "...not those committed in the heat of an argument." If I ever see a man physically abusing a woman or a child and I'm close enough to intercede I will not ask him why he is abusing her/him. I will give him a split second to cease his attack and put his hands in the air while I call the police. If he continues, I will still call the police but to report, "Man down with a gunshot wound,"instead.

  5. And so the therapeutic state is weaonized. How soon until those with ideologies opposing the elite are disarmed in the name of mental health? If it can start anywhere it can start in the hoosiers' slavishly politically correct capital city.

ADVERTISEMENT