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DTCI: Indiana Civil Litigation Review

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The next issue of the Indiana Civil Litigation Review will be on members’ desks in a few weeks. Members and subscribers can anticipate another issue full of valuable information and analyses by leaders of Indiana’s defense bar. Some of the articles that will appear in this issue include

The Sufficient Rational Basis Test – A “Grand Unified Theory” of Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress, Matthew D. Bruno

Worker’s Compensation: Abrogation of Positional Risk Doctrine, Christopher Cross

Outage: Limitations on Use of National Codes and Standards in Actions against Electric Utilities, Thomas J. Jarzyniecki & Nicholas W. Levi

The Frivolous Claim: Will You Know It When You See It?, Belinda Rose Johnson- Hurtado

Clarian Health v. Wagler: Update, Katherine G. Karres

No Warning … So What? – The Indiana Supreme Court’s Ruling in Kovach v. Caligor Midwest and Proximate Cause Given the Read-and-Heed Presumption in Failure-to-Warn Cases, Melanie D. Margolin & Lucy R. Dollens

Rescission of Settlement Agreements and “Unsettling” Failures to Disclose Insurance Coverage, Ted W. Nolting

The Expertise of Medical Experts: Assessing Medical Education and Specialization When Experts Opine Across Specialties, Kevin C. Rasp

Environmental Insurance Coverage Update, Casey R. Stafford

The Indiana Civil Litigation Review welcomes submissions from DTCI members and others on topics of interest to the Indiana defense bar. Please write Molly McClellan, managing editor, if you have a topic you would like the board of editors to consider. MMcClellan@dtci.org.•

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  1. Your article is a good intro the recent amendments to Fed.R.Civ.P. For a much longer - though not necessarily better -- summary, counsel might want to read THE CHIEF UMPIRE IS CHANGING THE STRIKE ZONE, which I co-authored and which was just published in the January issue of THE VERDICT (the monthly publication of the Indiana Trial Lawyers Association).

  2. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  3. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  4. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  5. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

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