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Editorial: Nature of work requires adequate safety plan

IL Staff
August 18, 2010
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Indiana Lawyer Editorial

A few days after then-U.S. District Court Judge David Hamilton ruled in late 2005 in Anthony Hinrichs, et al. v. Brian Bosma, et al., that sectarian prayer could not be used to open legislative sessions, we received a phone call from someone who wanted the judge’s e-mail address and contact information.

We declined to give that information.

We would decline in any circumstances to give information any of our sources entrust us with, but our concern for the judge’s safety was utmost in our thoughts given the backlash at the time from people who did not see the case the way the judge did. Personal blogs and commenting on the news of the day were not so commonplace then, but people who wanted to share their opinions on this particular decision found a way to make their points clear.

We’re sure that our caller found a way to make his point to the judge if he was determined to do so, and we’re sure the U.S. Marshal’s Service at the court did its work to maintain the judge’s safety.

Fast-forward a few years and it’s now commonplace for bloggers and would-be news commentators to voice criticism against judges who dare to see things differently from them.

We direct you to a story in this issue of the newspaper that starts on Page 1 concerning judicial safety.

A third trial recently happened in a federal court in Brooklyn over a particular case involving judicial safety. Blogger Hal Turner wrote that Chief Judge Frank Easterbrook and Judges Richard Posner and William Bauer of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals were “traitors” and “tyrants” and that they should be killed for their June 2009 decision that upheld a gun ban in Chicago on the grounds that the 2nd Amendment didn’t apply to the states.

Specifically, Turner wrote that he believed judges ignore the U.S. Constitution because “… they have not, in our lifetime, faced REAL free men willing to walk up to them and kill them for their defiance and disobedience. Let me be the first to say this plainly, these judges deserve to be killed. Their blood will replenish the tree of liberty; a small price to pay to assure freedom for millions.”

The U.S Attorney in Chicago says the online speech is a threat on the judges’ lives, while Turner maintains this is merely his opinion regarding what should happen to the judges and that his opinion is protected by the First Amendment. The first two trials ended in mistrials when the juries failed to reach a decision; a third found him guilty.

Turner claims his words were not a call to action but merely political speech, and he points to the fact that the judges were not harmed as evidence of this. The prosecution points to the fact that Turner included the judges’ office addresses, photo of the building where they work, and a map of the area as an attempt to bring harm to the judges by providing information to anyone motivated enough to carry out the deeds he called for. The judges have said they did not change their security measures because of the threat last summer but believe the blog post was a threat on their lives.

We also heard that Judge Posner was particularly irritated at needing to testify at the second trial because it took away from the time he could devote to his work. We share his irritation; we’d rather have him at work than testifying against crackpots. But if his testimony can put this crackpot away for up to 10 years, then so be it.

We bring this to your attention here because we want readers to consider their own personal safety. We would imagine that few of you are completely immune from a threat. The nature of the work you do means that some people win and some people lose. Even in a mediation setting, not everyone gets everything they want all the time. If you’ve never thought about your safety at work and away from the office, we encourage you to devote some time to that immediately and put a plan in place.

We do not often have occasion to write about threats or harm that comes to lawyers and judges in their work, and we’d like to keep it that way.•

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Readers may offer opinions concerning Indiana Lawyer stories and other legal issues. Readers may respond immediately by viewing the “submissions” section on our Web site: www.theindianalawyer.com. We reserve the right to edit letters for space requirements and to reproduce letters on Indiana Lawyer’s Web site and on online databases. We do not publish anonymous letters. Direct letters to editor Rebecca Collier at rcollier@ibj.com or 41 E. Washington St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46204.

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  1. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  2. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  3. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  4. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  5. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

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