Editorial

Editorial: New judges add more than needed diversity

June 23, 2010
Rebecca Collier
Those of us on staff here at the newspaper that grew up in Indiana and were of a certain age to pay attention to the news can likely recall when Judge Sarah Evans Barker was confirmed to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Editorial: Don't keep quiet, join a healthy debate

June 9, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
We know you have opinions – thoughtful, reasonable ones that would make for great discourse in the newspaper. But getting you to share them is more difficult than we would like.
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Editorial: Hunt for victims' rights

May 26, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer

Here at the newspaper, we’re big fans of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. But we understand the need for and exuberance some individuals feel for the Second Amendment: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

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Editorial: Political pomposity a disservice to public

April 28, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
Dawn Johnsen deserved the nomination, and definitely was the right woman for the job, but unfortunately partisan vitriol appears to be worth more in Washington, D.C., than doing the right thing.
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Editorial: We the People team's civics study heartens many

April 14, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
Like it or not, we live in a time where, for some people at least, it's become acceptable to speak about "reloading" when doing battle against political opponents and to mark their political districts with gun sites, and where members of a Midwestern church believe it's their duty to travel the nation and spew hate-laced messages in places where people are mourning tragedy.
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Editorial: Lawmakers don't inspire confidence

March 17, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Frank Sullivan certainly spoke for us when he asked this question a couple of weeks ago: "Wouldn't we feel better about all of this if it hadn't been enacted on partyline votes, though?"
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Editorial: Losing sight of the goal

March 3, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
Feb. 25 was certainly an ugly day.
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Editorial: Deadbeat bill a good idea

February 17, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
At first glance, the legislation seems like the sort that no one could possibly have an objection to.
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Editorial: SCOTUS order in Proposition 8 trial chills

January 20, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
It sounded too good be true, so we weren't surprised when we found out it was not to be.
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Editorial: Quit stalling nominations

January 6, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
After languishing in the U.S. Senate for about 10 months, the nomination of Dawn Johnsen to lead the Office of Legal Counsel finally got some action.
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Editorial: State should avoid selection slugfests

July 23, 2008
Editorial Indiana Lawyer
We'd like to see the average voter know more about our appellate courts.
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  1. Paul Ogden doing a fine job of remembering his peer Gary Welsh with the post below and a call for an Indy gettogether to celebrate Gary .... http://www.ogdenonpolitics.com/2016/05/indiana-loses-citizen-journalist-giant.html Castaways of Indiana, unite!

  2. It's unfortunate that someone has attempted to hijack the comments to promote his own business. This is not an article discussing the means of preserving the record; no matter how it's accomplished, ethics and impartiality are paramount concerns. When a party to litigation contracts directly with a reporting firm, it creates, at the very least, the appearance of a conflict of interest. Court reporters, attorneys and judges are officers of the court and must abide by court rules as well as state and federal laws. Parties to litigation have no such ethical responsibilities. Would we accept insurance companies contracting with judges? This practice effectively shifts costs to the party who can least afford it while reducing costs for the party with the most resources. The success of our justice system depends on equal access for all, not just for those who have the deepest pockets.

  3. As a licensed court reporter in California, I have to say that I'm sure that at some point we will be replaced by speech recognition. However, from what I've seen of it so far, it's a lot farther away than three years. It doesn't sound like Mr. Hubbard has ever sat in a courtroom or a deposition room where testimony is being given. Not all procedures are the same, and often they become quite heated with the ends of question and beginning of answers overlapping. The human mind can discern the words to a certain extent in those cases, but I doubt very much that a computer can yet. There is also the issue of very heavy accents and mumbling. People speak very fast nowadays, and in order to do that, they generally slur everything together, they drop or swallow words like "the" and "and." Voice recognition might be able to produce some form of a transcript, but I'd be very surprised if it produces an accurate or verbatim transcript, as is required in the legal world.

  4. Really enjoyed the profile. Congratulations to Craig on living the dream, and kudos to the pros who got involved to help him realize the vision.

  5. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

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