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Evansville bar preps for anniversary

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Bar Crawl

Leading to its 100th anniversary in less than a year, the Evansville Bar Association has been making preparations to celebrate the anticipated completion of The Randall T. Shepard Courtroom, named for the current chief justice of the Indiana Supreme Court and an Evansville native.

The courtroom will be the site of a hard hat reception in October and will be renovated in time for the association’s anniversary celebration at the EBA’s Law Day event in April 2011, EBA executive director Susan Vollmer told Indiana Lawyer.
 

bar crawl The Vanderburgh County courtroom is undergoing restorations thanks to EBA. (IL Photo/ Rebecca Berfanger)

Chief Justice Shepard was also instrumental in encouraging EBA members to support the renovations, Vollmer said. She said she has already had some conflicts when trying to schedule the EBA receptions due to other organizations and individuals who have already booked the courthouse, which is partially renovated already.

The courtroom, which originally housed the Vanderburgh Superior Court, will likely be used for some court hearings, as well as teen court, memorial events, and other special events for the Evansville legal community.

Another way the organization will celebrate the anniversary is an oral history project. Retired former executive director Susan Helfrich continues to work on interviews that will ultimately be available to the public. The history of the Evansville legal community – and how various trials and legal events have shaped the community at large – once completed will also be included in a display at the historic courthouse and online for classrooms to use.

While most of the history project is intended to be online, according to EBA president-elect Todd Glass, there will be panels on the wall and a table with information and ultimately computer terminals in the hallway outside the courtroom for visitors to learn about the legal history of southwest Indiana.

A local high school has also been recruited to work on a video project for the EBA. The bar association gave video editing and recording equipment to the school to use for their project, and the school will keep the equipment for any future projects they have.

Chief Justice Shepard will be recognized in another way this fall through a new program at Harrison High School, part of the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation. The Randall T. Shepard Academy for Law and Social Justice will start at the beginning of the 2010-11 school year.•

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  1. Future generations will be amazed that we prosecuted people for possessing a harmless plant. The New York Times came out in favor of legalization in Saturday's edition of the newspaper.

  2. Well, maybe it's because they are unelected, and, they have a tendency to strike down laws by elected officials from all over the country. When you have been taught that "Democracy" is something almost sacred, then, you will have a tendency to frown on such imperious conduct. Lawyers get acculturated in law school into thinking that this is the very essence of high minded government, but to people who are more heavily than King George ever did, they may not like it. Thanks for the information.

  3. I pd for a bankruptcy years ago with Mr Stiles and just this week received a garnishment from my pay! He never filed it even though he told me he would! Don't let this guy practice law ever again!!!

  4. Excellent initiative on the part of the AG. Thankfully someone takes action against predators taking advantage of people who have already been through the wringer. Well done!

  5. Conour will never turn these funds over to his defrauded clients. He tearfully told the court, and his daughters dutifully pledged in interviews, that his first priority is to repay every dime of the money he stole from his clients. Judge Young bought it, much to the chagrin of Conour’s victims. Why would Conour need the $2,262 anyway? Taxpayers are now supporting him, paying for his housing, utilities, food, healthcare, and clothing. If Conour puts the money anywhere but in the restitution fund, he’s proved, once again, what a con artist he continues to be and that he has never had any intention of repaying his clients. Judge Young will be proven wrong... again; Conour has no remorse and the Judge is one of the many conned.

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