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Evansville bar preps for anniversary

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Bar Crawl

Leading to its 100th anniversary in less than a year, the Evansville Bar Association has been making preparations to celebrate the anticipated completion of The Randall T. Shepard Courtroom, named for the current chief justice of the Indiana Supreme Court and an Evansville native.

The courtroom will be the site of a hard hat reception in October and will be renovated in time for the association’s anniversary celebration at the EBA’s Law Day event in April 2011, EBA executive director Susan Vollmer told Indiana Lawyer.
 

bar crawl The Vanderburgh County courtroom is undergoing restorations thanks to EBA. (IL Photo/ Rebecca Berfanger)

Chief Justice Shepard was also instrumental in encouraging EBA members to support the renovations, Vollmer said. She said she has already had some conflicts when trying to schedule the EBA receptions due to other organizations and individuals who have already booked the courthouse, which is partially renovated already.

The courtroom, which originally housed the Vanderburgh Superior Court, will likely be used for some court hearings, as well as teen court, memorial events, and other special events for the Evansville legal community.

Another way the organization will celebrate the anniversary is an oral history project. Retired former executive director Susan Helfrich continues to work on interviews that will ultimately be available to the public. The history of the Evansville legal community – and how various trials and legal events have shaped the community at large – once completed will also be included in a display at the historic courthouse and online for classrooms to use.

While most of the history project is intended to be online, according to EBA president-elect Todd Glass, there will be panels on the wall and a table with information and ultimately computer terminals in the hallway outside the courtroom for visitors to learn about the legal history of southwest Indiana.

A local high school has also been recruited to work on a video project for the EBA. The bar association gave video editing and recording equipment to the school to use for their project, and the school will keep the equipment for any future projects they have.

Chief Justice Shepard will be recognized in another way this fall through a new program at Harrison High School, part of the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation. The Randall T. Shepard Academy for Law and Social Justice will start at the beginning of the 2010-11 school year.•

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  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

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