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Evansville Bar to collaborate with school for history video

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As part of the Evansville Bar Association’s activities to commemorate its 100th anniversary, which will take place as part of their Law Day celebration in April 2011, the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation and the EBA announced today they will collaborate on a video of the last 100 years of the legal community in southwestern Indiana.

The announcement comes on the same day as an evening hardhat reception for donors who’ve contributed to the restoration of the Old Courthouse Superior Courtroom to be renamed “The Randall T. Shepard Courtroom.” That reception will include an address by Evansville native and Indiana Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard. The chief architect on the project will give tours. The $300,000 to renovate the courtroom was contributed mostly by EBA members and others in the Evansville community.

Students in Reitz High School’s award-winning “Feel the History” program, which was started by the EVSC in 2006, will produce a video using equipment donated by the EBA. Members of the Young Lawyers Section will work with the students, answering their questions about the law and giving critiques of their productions.

Among the awards for work with Feel the History include Grand Prize Winner for school districts over 20,000 in the American School Board Journal’s Magna Awards in 2009; in 2008 a team of students won first place in the Adobe School Innovation Awards and Adobe recognized Feel the History as an “Educational Success Story” featured on its website; teachers for the program, Jon Carl and Terry Hughes, were honored by the Indiana Computer Educators organization as Teacher of the Year and Technology Education Advocate in 2008; in 2007 Carl was named on the National School Boards Associations’ list of 20 to Watch, and Carl was named the Caleb Mills History Educator of the Year by the Indiana Historical Society in 2007.

Jeremy Villines, who will instruct the students, will divide them into groups to cover various issues, such as race relations and women in the law.

The video, as well as information collected by historian Bill Bartelt, who the EBA has commissioned to study the history of the first 100 years of the practice of law in Evansville, will be used as a teaching tool in classrooms. It will be available through the EBA’s website, and will also be available at the courthouse when it is completed.

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  1. Paul Ogden doing a fine job of remembering his peer Gary Welsh with the post below and a call for an Indy gettogether to celebrate Gary .... http://www.ogdenonpolitics.com/2016/05/indiana-loses-citizen-journalist-giant.html Castaways of Indiana, unite!

  2. It's unfortunate that someone has attempted to hijack the comments to promote his own business. This is not an article discussing the means of preserving the record; no matter how it's accomplished, ethics and impartiality are paramount concerns. When a party to litigation contracts directly with a reporting firm, it creates, at the very least, the appearance of a conflict of interest. Court reporters, attorneys and judges are officers of the court and must abide by court rules as well as state and federal laws. Parties to litigation have no such ethical responsibilities. Would we accept insurance companies contracting with judges? This practice effectively shifts costs to the party who can least afford it while reducing costs for the party with the most resources. The success of our justice system depends on equal access for all, not just for those who have the deepest pockets.

  3. As a licensed court reporter in California, I have to say that I'm sure that at some point we will be replaced by speech recognition. However, from what I've seen of it so far, it's a lot farther away than three years. It doesn't sound like Mr. Hubbard has ever sat in a courtroom or a deposition room where testimony is being given. Not all procedures are the same, and often they become quite heated with the ends of question and beginning of answers overlapping. The human mind can discern the words to a certain extent in those cases, but I doubt very much that a computer can yet. There is also the issue of very heavy accents and mumbling. People speak very fast nowadays, and in order to do that, they generally slur everything together, they drop or swallow words like "the" and "and." Voice recognition might be able to produce some form of a transcript, but I'd be very surprised if it produces an accurate or verbatim transcript, as is required in the legal world.

  4. Really enjoyed the profile. Congratulations to Craig on living the dream, and kudos to the pros who got involved to help him realize the vision.

  5. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

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