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Evansville Bar to collaborate with school for history video

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As part of the Evansville Bar Association’s activities to commemorate its 100th anniversary, which will take place as part of their Law Day celebration in April 2011, the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation and the EBA announced today they will collaborate on a video of the last 100 years of the legal community in southwestern Indiana.

The announcement comes on the same day as an evening hardhat reception for donors who’ve contributed to the restoration of the Old Courthouse Superior Courtroom to be renamed “The Randall T. Shepard Courtroom.” That reception will include an address by Evansville native and Indiana Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard. The chief architect on the project will give tours. The $300,000 to renovate the courtroom was contributed mostly by EBA members and others in the Evansville community.

Students in Reitz High School’s award-winning “Feel the History” program, which was started by the EVSC in 2006, will produce a video using equipment donated by the EBA. Members of the Young Lawyers Section will work with the students, answering their questions about the law and giving critiques of their productions.

Among the awards for work with Feel the History include Grand Prize Winner for school districts over 20,000 in the American School Board Journal’s Magna Awards in 2009; in 2008 a team of students won first place in the Adobe School Innovation Awards and Adobe recognized Feel the History as an “Educational Success Story” featured on its website; teachers for the program, Jon Carl and Terry Hughes, were honored by the Indiana Computer Educators organization as Teacher of the Year and Technology Education Advocate in 2008; in 2007 Carl was named on the National School Boards Associations’ list of 20 to Watch, and Carl was named the Caleb Mills History Educator of the Year by the Indiana Historical Society in 2007.

Jeremy Villines, who will instruct the students, will divide them into groups to cover various issues, such as race relations and women in the law.

The video, as well as information collected by historian Bill Bartelt, who the EBA has commissioned to study the history of the first 100 years of the practice of law in Evansville, will be used as a teaching tool in classrooms. It will be available through the EBA’s website, and will also be available at the courthouse when it is completed.

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  1. Just an aside, but regardless of the outcome, I 'm proud of Judge William Hughes. He was the original magistrate on the Home place issue. He ruled for Home Place, and was primaried by Brainard for it. Their tool Poindexter failed to unseat Hughes, who won support for his honesty and courage throughout the county, and he was reelected Judge of Hamilton County's Superior Court. You can still stand for something and survive. Thanks, Judge Hughes!

  2. CCHP's real accomplishment is the 2015 law signed by Gov Pence that basically outlaws any annexation that is forced where a 65% majority of landowners in the affected area disagree. Regardless of whether HP wins or loses, the citizens of Indiana will not have another fiasco like this. The law Gov Pence signed is a direct result of this malgovernance.

  3. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  4. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  5. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

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